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Re: [beemonitoring] Re: Raising pantraps above the ground

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  • Sam Droege
    Gidi: This is an interesting topic and I am guessing that as Julianna mentioned it may very much depend on what level bees are working. We are also working up
    Message 1 of 6 , Jan 14, 2009
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      Gidi:
       
      This is an interesting topic and I am guessing that as Julianna mentioned it may very much depend on what level bees are working.  We are also working up a paper that looks at height, but we elevated bowls above the level of a fields and found a that the elevated bowls had a huge reduction in catch.  Also note that quite a number of people have elevated bowls in their studies, using wire bowl holders (Campbell in the SE), Romey in the Adirondacks by putting bowls on slash and rocks, Hopwood in Kansas (we hope to collaborate on a larger evaluation) using wire holders, Europeans using a variety of holders for their Moericke traps (which are really just large pan traps), some have even nailed the holders to the tree.  I will send you a picture separately of a holder made out of rebar. 
       
      In any case I would suggest that you also deploy some bowls on the ground, just to document the catch difference.  Another factor is height in the tree.  I have noticed when netting off of apple or other tree/shrub plants that most of the bee activity appears to be at the very top of the tree and less along the sides even if blooms are present throughout....or it could just be the grass is always greener, but in any case it might be interesting to try more than one height within the orchard too.
       
      Finally, I am not sure how you plan to run your traps, but I would suggest that you do as a number of workers have done (particularly because you have so much work invested in elevating your bowls and that is to add a preservative to the water solution (A 1% formalin, glycol, salt in watr) and run the traps continuously cleaning them out once a week or so.  You eliminate a lot of time of day, time of month effects that way and you increase your catch.  If using water rather than glycol be sure to account for evaporation and the effect of added rain to the traps.  Alternatively, you don't really need a preservative as Jane Whitaker demonstrated last year when she had to leave traps out for 2 weeks with just soapy water.  .... they smelled bad, but processed into nice looking specimens without a problem.
       
      I will send you some papers and pictures off line.
       
      sam
       
       


      -----beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com wrote: -----

      To: beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com
      From: "tuelljul" <tuelljul@...>
      Sent by: beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com
      Date: 01/13/2009 08:37PM
      Subject: [beemonitoring] Re: Raising pantraps above the ground


      Hi Gidi,

      I have two papers coming soon that relate directly to this topic: a
      methods paper (which will appear in Entomologia Experimentalis et
      Applicata sometime this year) on the subject of ground versus canopy
      placement of pan traps, and another on my study of the wild bee
      community associated with highbush blueberry in Michigan, USA in which
      elevated traps were used (soon to be published in Annals of the
      Entomological Society of America).

      In short, yes, elevating traps in a crop canopy (at least in highbush
      blueberry) will result in significantly greater numbers of bees
      collected in pan traps. It will also result in the capture of honey
      bees (whereas most pan trap users as far as I am aware rarely collect
      honey bees in ground level traps).

      I glued pan traps to PVC couplers that fit onto PVC poles that could
      be cut to the length desired. A piece of steel rebar, partially
      inserted into the soil, was used to stabilize the pole. They were
      relatively easy to put up and take down, so theoretically you could
      set them up for for the duration of a trapping incident, and then take
      them down again immediately afterward. I did have a couple of poles
      run over by tractors, but most of them survived. I can send you a
      diagram of what I am describing if you need it.

      I will be very interested to learn what you find in almond.

      Best wishes,

      Julianna Tuell
      Department of Entomology
      Michigan State University

      --- In beemonitoring@ yahoogroups. com , "Gidi" <gidpisa79@. ..> wrote:
      >
      > Hello everyone. We are going to sample bees in almond orchards within
      > a month. Since flowering is not at ground level, I believe it is
      > better to position the pan traps about a meter above ground, to match
      > the height of blossoms.
      >
      > I wanted to ask if any of you have used any equipment to raise
      > pantraps above ground level. I guess it is better to use something
      > portable rather than sticking poles deep in the ground - I think the
      > farmers won't like the latter idea very much... This has to be cheap,
      > not too big or too heavy, and to resist at least moderate winds. Any
      > ideas anyone?
      >
      > As an alternative, we considered hanging the bowls from the almond
      > trees' branches, like flower pots. Do you think this can work?
      >
      > Thank you in advance,
      >
      > Gidi Pisanty
      > Hebrew University of Jerusalem
      >



    • Karen Wetherill
      Gidi, I use funnel traps not pan traps, and I was concerned about coyotes or other wildlife getting into the glycol, I constructed a raised platform with just
      Message 2 of 6 , Jan 14, 2009
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        Gidi, I use funnel traps not pan traps, and I was concerned about coyotes
        or other wildlife getting into the glycol, I constructed a raised platform
        with just rebar, 1/8 inch plywood and chicken wire. The chicken wire
        keeps the wind and most of the wildlife from disturbing the traps. I
        attached a picture. Karen

        On Tue, 13 Jan 2009, Gidi wrote:

        > Hello everyone. We are going to sample bees in almond orchards within
        > a month. Since flowering is not at ground level, I believe it is
        > better to position the pan traps about a meter above ground, to match
        > the height of blossoms.
        >
        > I wanted to ask if any of you have used any equipment to raise
        > pantraps above ground level. I guess it is better to use something
        > portable rather than sticking poles deep in the ground - I think the
        > farmers won't like the latter idea very much... This has to be cheap,
        > not too big or too heavy, and to resist at least moderate winds. Any
        > ideas anyone?
        >
        > As an alternative, we considered hanging the bowls from the almond
        > trees' branches, like flower pots. Do you think this can work?
        >
        > Thank you in advance,
        >
        > Gidi Pisanty
        > Hebrew University of Jerusalem
        >
        >
      • Gidi
        I hope this time the message will appear on the group page... Thank you all for the swift and detailed replies. Leaving traps for long periods seems convenient
        Message 3 of 6 , Jan 14, 2009
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          I hope this time the message will appear on the group page...

          Thank you all for the swift and detailed replies.

          Leaving traps for long periods seems convenient in certain aspects,
          but not in all. First, the trap can become clogged with plant debris
          (in almond, for instance, one can think of flower petals) which will
          mask its attracting color. Second, I had an incidence in which on
          leaving the bowls in the morning I had already caught a honeybee,
          but when returning at dusk it had disappeared, the bowl remaining
          intact with the liquid. Maybe on elevated stands this is less of a
          problem, but even then I guess there could be predators which will
          find the bowls and empty them. Third, leaving the bowls in the field
          means using different bowls for each plot, which means painting many
          more of them.

          I think I will try to use the trees to hold the bowls, either hang
          them from the branches or tie them to the trunk. Either way, I
          prefer to pick up the bowls at the end of the day and reuse the same
          ones in new plots the following day.

          Another issue - has any of you ever tried using eco-friendly
          detergent (such as Ecover's) instead of the ordinary kitchen
          detergent? Occasionally the bowls' contents get spilled on the
          ground and I don't feel really happy about it... especially when
          working in natural areas.

          Gidi Pisanty
        • Karen Wetherill
          Gidi, when I first tried pan traps in the windy desert I used little squares of velcro on the platform and the bottom of the bowl. This worked for a little
          Message 4 of 6 , Jan 14, 2009
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            Gidi, when I first tried pan traps in the windy desert I used little
            squares of velcro on the platform and the bottom of the bowl. This worked
            for a little while, but the velcro didn't hold up all year. I had to use
            a staple gun to attach it to the wood platform, but it stuck great to the
            plastic bowl. I thought this might help if you are going to have bowls
            hanging from trees. Karen

            On Wed, 14 Jan 2009, Gidi wrote:

            > I hope this time the message will appear on the group page...
            >
            > Thank you all for the swift and detailed replies.
            >
            > Leaving traps for long periods seems convenient in certain aspects,
            > but not in all. First, the trap can become clogged with plant debris
            > (in almond, for instance, one can think of flower petals) which will
            > mask its attracting color. Second, I had an incidence in which on
            > leaving the bowls in the morning I had already caught a honeybee,
            > but when returning at dusk it had disappeared, the bowl remaining
            > intact with the liquid. Maybe on elevated stands this is less of a
            > problem, but even then I guess there could be predators which will
            > find the bowls and empty them. Third, leaving the bowls in the field
            > means using different bowls for each plot, which means painting many
            > more of them.
            >
            > I think I will try to use the trees to hold the bowls, either hang
            > them from the branches or tie them to the trunk. Either way, I
            > prefer to pick up the bowls at the end of the day and reuse the same
            > ones in new plots the following day.
            >
            > Another issue - has any of you ever tried using eco-friendly
            > detergent (such as Ecover's) instead of the ordinary kitchen
            > detergent? Occasionally the bowls' contents get spilled on the
            > ground and I don't feel really happy about it... especially when
            > working in natural areas.
            >
            > Gidi Pisanty
            >
            >
            >
            >
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