Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Hi Dave Smith: [beemonitoring] pan trapping vs malaise trapping for pollinator inventories

Expand Messages
  • Edward M. Barrows
    January 7, 2009 Hi Dave Smith, I ran Townes-style Malaise traps (without baits) in the 1970s through 1990s, in Washington, D.C.; Maryland; Virginia; and West
    Message 1 of 6 , Jan 7, 2009
    • 0 Attachment
      January 7, 2009

      Hi Dave Smith,

      I ran Townes-style Malaise traps (without baits) in the 1970s through
      1990s, in Washington, D.C.; Maryland; Virginia; and West Virginia
      (depending on the year). The traps obtained large bee samples. The
      resource input to process the specimens is very high as Matthew Sarver
      indicated. Most bees are removed from the samples, I have 1000s of bee
      specimens in need of analysis, and I am very behind in publishing about
      the bees, but did get out:

      Kalhorn, K. D., E. M. Barrows, and W. E. LaBerge. 2003. Bee
      (Hymenoptera: Apoidea: Apiformes) Diversity in an Appalachian Shale
      Barrens. Journal of the Kansas Entomological Society 76: 455–468.

      Cheers, Edd Barrows


      David_r_smith@... wrote:
      >
      > Hi All,
      >
      > I have looked at earlier studies where malaise traps were used to
      > collect flying insects as part of montane pollinator studies. Are
      > malaise traps still used or have pantraps and netting been deemed a
      > suitable replacement?. I know you can buy a lot a small plastic cups
      > for the price of a malaise trap.
      >
      > Thanks a lot,
      >
      > Dave Smith
    • Julio A. Genaro
      I agree with Matt I ran Malaise traps in subtropics without many success on bees. More on Diptera, moths and parasitic wasps. An interseption trap with big
      Message 2 of 6 , Jan 7, 2009
      • 0 Attachment
        I agree with Matt
        I ran Malaise traps in subtropics without many success on bees. More on Diptera, moths and parasitic wasps.
        An interseption trap with big yellow plates below was better for me.
        a combination of several techniques will be better. Don't forget to sweep with an entomological net
        cheers
        julio

        ________________________

        Julio A. Genaro
        http://caribbeanahigroup.org
        Editor Cocuyo:
        Newsletter of Invertebrate Zoologists of the Antilles
        Editor Solenodon: Antillean Journal of Zoological Taxomomy 
        Personal webside: http://www.caribbeanahigroup.org/editorialboard.htm 






        To: beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com
        From: mjsarver@...
        Date: Wed, 7 Jan 2009 10:35:16 -0500
        Subject: RE: [beemonitoring] pan trapping vs malaise trapping for pollinator inventories

        Dave -
         
        Since malaise traps don't rely on the insect being attracted to the colored bowl, the malaise will yield a much broader sample of the flying insect community, especially if you use a modified design that includes a lower collection chamber for those insects that drop down, rather than fly up, when they hit the mesh.  I don't know how bee catches in particular compare between malaise and bowl traps, but you will likely get a much larger sample (in terms of both diversity and bulk) of other Hymenoptera, Diptera, and Coleoptera from a malaise, including many groups of insects that you would not get from bowl traps.  Conversely, you lose the attraction power of the UV paints, so the malaise is likely to be less efficient at capturing bees, if that is your group of interest.  You will also catch a lot moths, and will have a lot of sorting (and washing of moth scales) to do to pick out your groups of interest.  Make sure you have the finances and manpower to process malaise samples before you decide to use them.  The process is extremely labot-intensive.  Bowl trap and netting samples are much less labor-intensive to clean and sort.  Malaise traps definitely still have their place in the sampling repertoire, if you have the resources to purchase, deploy, and process samples from them.  It really depends upon the goals of your study.  Hope that is helpful!
         
        Best
        Matt
         
        Matthew Sarver
        Sarver Ecological Consulting
        173 Wallace Rd
        Blairsville, PA 15717
        Cell: 724-689-5845
          


        From: beemonitoring@ yahoogroups. com [mailto:beemonitori ng@yahoogroups. com] On Behalf Of David_r_smith@ fws.gov
        Sent: Wednesday, January 07, 2009 10:12 AM
        To: beemonitoring@ yahoogroups. com
        Subject: [beemonitoring] pan trapping vs malaise trapping for pollinator inventories


        Hi All,

        I have looked at earlier studies where malaise traps were used to collect flying insects as part of montane pollinator studies.  Are malaise traps still used or have pantraps and netting been deemed a suitable replacement? .  I know you can buy a lot a small plastic cups for the price of a malaise trap.

        Thanks  a lot,

        Dave Smith




        Get easy photo sharing with Windows Live™ Photos. Drag n’ drop
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.