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Everyman's Osmia accounts ready for mark-up

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  • Sam Droege
    All: Jim Cane and I have produced an Osmia Everyman s account which is ready for your suggestions and mark up below. Thanks for the continued input. sam
    Message 1 of 4 , Dec 10, 2008
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      All:

      Jim Cane and I have produced an Osmia Everyman's account which is ready for your suggestions and mark up below.   Thanks for the continued input.

      sam

      Everyman’s Guide to The Common Groups of Bees



      Scientific Name:  Osmia (OZ-me-uh)

      Common Names:  for a few of the species - Mason Bees, Orchard Bees (Osmia lignaria), Hornfaced Bees (2 imported Asian species)

      Approximate Number of Species in Canada:  56

      Approximate Number of Species East of the Rockies:  37

      Approximate Number of Species West of the Rockies:  128

      Approximate Number of Species in Mexico: 14 (Many more likely to be found with more work in northern Mexico)

      General Abundance in Eastern Gardens:  Regular

      General Abundance in Western Gardens:  Regular outside of warm deserts

      Time of Year:  Almost entirely restricted to spring and early summer, but a few species extend their season into June and July; generally more species and more abundant in the north and in the mountains than the Deep South and the warm deserts.

      General Look and Feel:  Most about the size of a small House Fly up to that of a honeybee; most dark metallic blue (often appearing black out-of-doors), some common (in the Mid-Atlantic areas particularly), introduced hornfaced bees are brown and about the size of honeybees.  Many western species are brilliant metallic green or blue, among the most beautiful bees in the US; all females have ranks of even-length long hairs under their abdomen that they use to carry pollen (noticeable with a pollen load); all are relatively large-headed, short and chunky in shape; all but the fuzzy introduced species have +sparse body hairs (for a bee).  Can be confused with several other genera.

      Stinging: Little to no concern; Osmia do not defend their nests; nesting materials can be set up safely in any public space.

      Nesting Site:  Variable.  Some species nest shallowly underground, others in hollow twigs or old beetle burrows in dead wood, a few make free-standing nests against rock surfaces; most species build with masticated leaf pulp; a few mix in sand or mud, or use it exclusively (such as the blue orchard bee).

      Overwintering Site:  All remain in their larval nest cells as dormant adults.

      Favorite Flowers:  Often associated with blooming trees and shrubs and perennial wildflowers, in gardens they are attracted to all of the northern fruit trees and brambles, but found as well on the wild members of the family such as cherry, plum, and rose, plus many other spring blooming plants such as redbud (Cercis), tulip poplar (Liriodendron), oak (Quercus), ash (Fraxinus), Manzanita (Arctostaphylos), spring wildflowers of the pea family, composites, penstemons, blueberries (Vaccinium) and more; most are not narrow floral specialists.

      Interesting Osmia Facts:  
      -        Several species are now used commercially to pollinate fruit and berry crops, with more species under development.
      -        Several species nest in abandoned snail shells, more in Europe than here.
      -        Mud or leaf pulp is carried as a ball using the mandibles or facial horns.  Where abundant, mud-collecting species may be found quarrying mud together.

      Web Sites and Technical ID Guides:  
      http://www.discoverlife.org/mp/20q?guide=Osmia_male
      http://www.discoverlife.org/mp/20q?guide=Osmia_female
      http://www.greatsunflower.org/en/osmia-leaf-cutter-bees
      http://bugguide.net/node/view/14967/tree
      http://wildblueberries.maine.edu/factsheets/Production/301.html
      http://www.ars.usda.gov/Services/Services.htm?modecode=54-28-05-00

      How to Attract:  Planting of native and orchard spring flowering shrubs and brambles is important and a wide variety of spring wildflowers will provide additional pollen and nectar sources; there are plans on the Internet (see USDA web site above) for how to create nesting structures, but general process is simple:  drill deep, small holes in whatever wooden surfaces you can, drill bits from 1/8th in to ¼” are suitable, the longer the bit the better, porch and fence posts are ideal; providing a site in your yard with accessible damp clay will help the species that plug their nests with mud.  Some species will also use cut reeds or cut twigs with hollow centers (e.g. large forsythia cuttings or dead sumac (Rhus) twigs).  Do not reuse nesting materials for more than a few years, as diseases and parasites will accumulate.


      P Please don't print this e-mail unless really needed.
    • Pollinator@sc.rr.com
      We need to change one concept on these sheets, which is expressed on this as How to attract. I ve been working for years to educate people on how misleading
      Message 2 of 4 , Dec 12, 2008
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        We need to change one concept on these sheets, which is expressed on this as "How to attract."

        I've been working for years to educate people on how misleading this is. Attracting bees is not the issue when their populations are thin.

        The issue is to build up healthy populations of them, not to attract them. Habitat, AKA nesting sites, forage (continuous for the lifespan of the species), and most of all, protecting them from pesticide misuse, which is pretty widespread.

        It's even more ridiculous when referring to honeybees - kind of like planting clover to attract dairy cows. I tell people then it's a matter of "attracting a beekeeper."

        Could that be changed to "Building healthy populations," or somthing that more accurately describes the objective?

        Dave Green



        ---- Sam Droege <sdroege@...> wrote:
        > All:
        >
        > Jim Cane and I have produced an Osmia Everyman's account which is ready
        > for your suggestions and mark up below. Thanks for the continued input.
        >
        > sam
        >
        > Everyman?s Guide to The Common Groups of Bees
        >
        >
        > Scientific Name: Osmia (OZ-me-uh)
        >
        > Common Names: for a few of the species - Mason Bees, Orchard Bees (Osmia
        > lignaria), Hornfaced Bees (2 imported Asian species)
        >
        > Approximate Number of Species in Canada: 56
        >
        > Approximate Number of Species East of the Rockies: 37
        >
        > Approximate Number of Species West of the Rockies: 128
        >
        > Approximate Number of Species in Mexico: 14 (Many more likely to be found
        > with more work in northern Mexico)
        >
        > General Abundance in Eastern Gardens: Regular
        >
        > General Abundance in Western Gardens: Regular outside of warm deserts
        >
        > Time of Year: Almost entirely restricted to spring and early summer, but
        > a few species extend their season into June and July; generally more
        > species and more abundant in the north and in the mountains than the Deep
        > South and the warm deserts.
        >
        > General Look and Feel: Most about the size of a small House Fly up to
        > that of a honeybee; most dark metallic blue (often appearing black
        > out-of-doors), some common (in the Mid-Atlantic areas particularly),
        > introduced hornfaced bees are brown and about the size of honeybees. Many
        > western species are brilliant metallic green or blue, among the most
        > beautiful bees in the US; all females have ranks of even-length long hairs
        > under their abdomen that they use to carry pollen (noticeable with a
        > pollen load); all are relatively large-headed, short and chunky in shape;
        > all but the fuzzy introduced species have +sparse body hairs (for a bee).
        > Can be confused with several other genera.
        >
        > Stinging: Little to no concern; Osmia do not defend their nests; nesting
        > materials can be set up safely in any public space.
        >
        > Nesting Site: Variable. Some species nest shallowly underground, others
        > in hollow twigs or old beetle burrows in dead wood, a few make
        > free-standing nests against rock surfaces; most species build with
        > masticated leaf pulp; a few mix in sand or mud, or use it exclusively
        > (such as the blue orchard bee).
        >
        > Overwintering Site: All remain in their larval nest cells as dormant
        > adults.
        >
        > Favorite Flowers: Often associated with blooming trees and shrubs and
        > perennial wildflowers, in gardens they are attracted to all of the
        > northern fruit trees and brambles, but found as well on the wild members
        > of the family such as cherry, plum, and rose, plus many other spring
        > blooming plants such as redbud (Cercis), tulip poplar (Liriodendron), oak
        > (Quercus), ash (Fraxinus), Manzanita (Arctostaphylos), spring wildflowers
        > of the pea family, composites, penstemons, blueberries (Vaccinium) and
        > more; most are not narrow floral specialists.
        >
        > Interesting Osmia Facts:
        > - Several species are now used commercially to pollinate fruit and
        > berry crops, with more species under development.
        > - Several species nest in abandoned snail shells, more in Europe
        > than here.
        > - Mud or leaf pulp is carried as a ball using the mandibles or
        > facial horns. Where abundant, mud-collecting species may be found
        > quarrying mud together.
        >
        > Web Sites and Technical ID Guides:
        > http://www.discoverlife.org/mp/20q?guide=Osmia_male
        > http://www.discoverlife.org/mp/20q?guide=Osmia_female
        > http://www.greatsunflower.org/en/osmia-leaf-cutter-bees
        > http://bugguide.net/node/view/14967/tree
        > http://wildblueberries.maine.edu/factsheets/Production/301.html
        > http://www.ars.usda.gov/Services/Services.htm?modecode=54-28-05-00
        >
        > How to Attract: Planting of native and orchard spring flowering shrubs
        > and brambles is important and a wide variety of spring wildflowers will
        > provide additional pollen and nectar sources; there are plans on the
        > Internet (see USDA web site above) for how to create nesting structures,
        > but general process is simple: drill deep, small holes in whatever wooden
        > surfaces you can, drill bits from 1/8th in to ¼? are suitable, the longer
        > the bit the better, porch and fence posts are ideal; providing a site in
        > your yard with accessible damp clay will help the species that plug their
        > nests with mud. Some species will also use cut reeds or cut twigs with
        > hollow centers (e.g. large forsythia cuttings or dead sumac (Rhus) twigs).
        > Do not reuse nesting materials for more than a few years, as diseases and
        > parasites will accumulate.
        >
        >
        > P Please don't print this e-mail unless really needed.
      • Cane, Jim
        Sam- Dave has it right...nesting materials must be _attractive_ (or more accurately, deemed suitable by a female exploring for a nest site) for the species
        Message 3 of 4 , Dec 17, 2008
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          Sam- Dave has it right…nesting materials must be _attractive_ (or more accurately, deemed suitable by a female exploring for a nest site) for the species that you desire to increase, but in the end, one is enhancing nesting and foraging opportunities.  For shorthand, could the heading be “growing populations”?

           

          jim

           

          ===============================

          James H. Cane

          USDA-ARS Bee Biology and Systematics Lab

          Utah State University , Logan , UT 84322 USA

          tel: 435-797-3879   FAX: 435-797-0461

          email: Jim.Cane@... 

          web page: www.ars.usda.gov/npa/beelab

           

          "Seek simplicity but distrust it."
          Alfred North Whitehead

           

        • Sam Droege
          I like that too....will add. sam P Please don t print this e-mail unless really needed. Cane, Jim Sent by:
          Message 4 of 4 , Dec 18, 2008
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            I like that too....will add.

            sam

            P Please don't print this e-mail unless really needed.


            "Cane, Jim" <Jim.Cane@...>
            Sent by: beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com

            12/17/2008 12:33 PM

            Please respond to
            beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com

            To
            <beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com>
            cc
            Subject
            RE: [beemonitoring] Everyman's Osmia accounts ready for mark-up





            Sam- Dave has it right…nesting materials must be _attractive_ (or more accurately, deemed suitable by a female exploring for a nest site) for the species that you desire to increase, but in the end, one is enhancing nesting and foraging opportunities.  For shorthand, could the heading be “growing populations”?

             

            jim

             

            ===============================

            James H. Cane

            USDA-ARS Bee Biology and Systematics Lab

            Utah State University, Logan, UT 84322 USA

            tel: 435-797-3879   FAX: 435-797-0461

            email: Jim.Cane@...  

            web page: www.ars.usda.gov/npa/beelab

             

            "Seek simplicity but distrust it."
            Alfred North Whitehead

             


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