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more bees and bio-fuel

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  • elaineceleste
    Thanks for the input. I ll reply to the issues raised so far. Tai: In my attempt at brevity I left out many salient details, such as that this study will take
    Message 1 of 3 , Nov 21, 2008
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      Thanks for the input. I'll reply to the issues raised so far.

      Tai:
      In my attempt at brevity I left out many salient details, such as that
      this study will take place over several years. There will be surveys
      before any harvesting takes place, then there will be surveys for at
      least two years afterwards, more if funding continues.

      I need to figure out the best timing for the bee surveys, which will
      depend on what groups are focused on, or if it's a general survey. I
      think early spring will be important as that is a time when the
      differences between treatments will be the most dramatic. By
      mid-summer, most of the prairie vegetation will be grown back, and the
      sites will be more similar, at least in terms of the vegetative
      structure. Harvest will be happening in late fall.

      Pierre:
      They are going to harvest using standard farming equipment with
      flushing bars added. Harvesting will start in the center of the plots
      and work outwards to prevent any flushed animals from being
      concentrated in the middle of the field. Not important for bees, but
      they are surveying all kinds of wildlife. The unavoidable thing
      impacting the bees will be the driving of this equipment over the
      soil. I do know that they will be measuring soil quality through out
      the study.

      Charles:
      Can you explain what you mean by growth season recovery? My
      understanding of the reasoning behind the harvest in late fall is that
      it's a practical decision based on how growers using prairie for
      bio-fuel would do things. Harvest will be Sept-Oct or later. I don't
      know if they are considering differences in the prairie growing
      seasons in different areas of the study. I will ask about that.

      Jim:
      All land used in the study will have had established prairies for 5
      years or more. Beyond that 5 years there will variability in land use
      history, of course. The geographic scope of the study is large. There
      will be study sites in very different areas of the state (SE, North
      Central, and NE). Because of this there will be a replicated block design.

      I will look into Ceratina and Hylaeus as well as the smaller
      megachilids. Sam Droege also mentioned late season specialists like
      the eucerines. That gives me a good starting list of potential candidates.

      The main motivation behind the study is to encourage use of prairies
      for bio-fuel so that the Midwest does not end up as a sea of corn with
      a few soybean islands. If it can be demonstrated that land can be
      useful as both bio-fuel and as wildlife habitat, it may help in
      convincing people to follow that path.

      Can anyone suggest good resources for information about over-wintering
      habits of solitary bees? I don't suppose it will all be collected in
      one convenient place, but that sure would be nice. I need to expand my
      Bombus-centric view of the world.

      -Elaine
      http://www.befriendingbumblebees
    • Charles Guevara
         Hi again,Elaine.  I guess you just said it all for me !  Lands your calling: praire, will be utilized by growers for a celulosic energy crop
      Message 2 of 3 , Nov 22, 2008
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           Hi again,Elaine.  I guess you just 'said it all for me'!  Lands your calling: praire, will be utilized by 'growers' for a celulosic energy crop purposes.
         
           Good your doing what may be the first biodiversity formal studies for your Mn praire lands,patchy as these stressed and fragmented biomes are in con-US.
         
           Best wishes for successful studies, I hope the end objective 'cropp growers utilizeing praire lands for harvests'...I hope this doesn't bias your findings.
         
           charlie guevara ,NJ,US
         
         


        --- On Sat, 11/22/08, elaineceleste <fuzzybumblebee@...> wrote:
        From: elaineceleste <fuzzybumblebee@...>
        Subject: [beemonitoring] more bees and bio-fuel
        To: beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com
        Date: Saturday, November 22, 2008, 5:26 AM

        Thanks for the input.  I'll reply to the issues raised so far. 
        
        Tai:
        In my attempt at brevity I left out many salient details, such as that
        this study will take place over several years. There will be surveys
        before any harvesting takes place, then there will be surveys for at
        least two years afterwards, more if funding continues. 
        
        I need to figure out the best timing for the bee surveys, which will
        depend on what groups are focused on, or if it's a general survey.  I
        think early spring will be important as that is a time when the
        differences between treatments will be the most dramatic. By
        mid-summer, most of the prairie vegetation will be grown back, and the
        sites will be more similar, at least in terms of the vegetative
        structure. Harvest will be happening in late fall. 
        
        Pierre:
        They are going to harvest using standard farming equipment with
        flushing bars added. Harvesting will start in the center of the plots
        and work outwards to prevent any flushed animals from being
        concentrated in the middle of the field. Not important for bees, but
        they are surveying all kinds of wildlife. The unavoidable thing
        impacting the bees will be the driving of this equipment over the
        soil. I do know that they will be measuring soil quality through out
        the study.
        
        Charles:
        Can you explain what you mean by growth season recovery? My
        understanding of the reasoning behind the harvest in late fall is that
        it's a practical decision based on how growers using prairie for
        bio-fuel would do things. Harvest will be Sept-Oct or later. I don't
        know if they are considering differences in the prairie growing
        seasons in different areas of the study. I will ask about that.
        
        Jim:
        All land used in the study will have had established prairies for 5
        years or more. Beyond that 5 years there will variability in land use
        history, of course. The geographic scope of the study is large. There
        will be study sites in very different areas of the state (SE, North
        Central, and NE). Because of this there will be a replicated block design.
        
        I will look into Ceratina and Hylaeus as well as the smaller
        megachilids. Sam Droege also mentioned late season specialists like
        the eucerines. That gives me a good starting list of potential candidates.
        
        The main motivation behind the study is to encourage use of prairies
        for bio-fuel so that the Midwest does not end up as a sea of corn with
        a few soybean islands. If it can be demonstrated that land can be
        useful as both bio-fuel and as wildlife habitat, it may help in
        convincing people to follow that path.
        
        Can anyone suggest good resources for information about over-wintering
        habits of solitary bees? I don't suppose it will all be collected in
        one convenient place, but that sure would be nice. I need to expand my
        Bombus-centric view of the world. 
        
        -Elaine
        http://www.befriendingbumblebees
        
        
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      • Cane, Jim
        Elaine- let s see if I can get this right. First, as I understand it, the primitively eusocial sweat bees (Halictinae) do like your bumble bees, gynes
        Message 3 of 3 , Nov 24, 2008
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          Elaine- let’s see if I can get this right.  First, as I understand it, the primitively eusocial sweat bees (Halictinae) do like your bumble bees, gynes emerging in fall, mating, hanging out as adults somewhere, then starting nests come spring.  For non-social bees, many of the early spring species overwinter as adults in their natal nest cells, ready to go with the first warm days.  Sometimes this encompasses entire genera, such as Osmia, even the summer-flying species of Osmia (which baffles us).  Many other summer-flying bees overwinter as prepupae, and so need some days of warmth the following year to complete development.  Other folks can round this out for you. I can’t recollect of any specific publication that tabulates this for bee taxa of any region, handy as it would be.  Maybe someone will know of a source.

           

          Yours,

           

          jim

           

          ===============================

          James H. Cane

          USDA-ARS Bee Biology and Systematics Lab

          Utah State University , Logan , UT 84322 USA

          tel: 435-797-3879   FAX: 435-797-0461

          email: Jim.Cane@... 

          web page: www.ars.usda.gov/npa/beelab

           

          "Seek simplicity but distrust it."
          Alfred North Whitehead

           

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