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lupine pollen

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  • Kim McFarland
    Hi Bee Folks, Has anyone found a way to tell pollen from different Lupine species apart (once it is separated from the flower)? I will be looking at pollen
    Message 1 of 4 , Nov 12, 2008
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      Hi Bee Folks,

      Has anyone found a way to tell pollen from different Lupine species
      apart (once it is separated from the flower)? I will be looking at
      pollen loads taken off scopae and (hopefully) identifying the pollen
      grains to species when possible. I know Lupine pollen is difficult if
      not impossible to distinguish between species by just looking at the
      external structure. Does anyone know of any magic tricks to tell
      Lupine species apart?

      Thank you!

      Kim McFarland
      Humboldt State University
    • Peter Bernhardt
      Dear Kim: Attached, you will find an updated list of my publications. When attempting to identify pollen carried by bees I suggest you check out Bernhardt
      Message 2 of 4 , Nov 12, 2008
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        Dear Kim:

        Attached, you will find an updated list of my publications.  When attempting to identify pollen carried by bees I suggest you check out Bernhardt (2005) in the book  "Practical Pollination Biology" (pp. 371-380?.  When attempting to identify bee-transported pollen that may belong to several species in the same genus please consider reading Bernhardt & Weston (1996) in Telopea.  

        With the exception of mimosoid flowers that release grains in strictly numbered polyads (see my papers on Acacia) identifying grains belonging to the same genus of papilionoid legumes is never a picnic.  Does Lupinus color its pollen grains with pigmented lipid bodies (pollen coat) as in a number of Australian Pultanea spp.?  Do the grains of different Lupinus spp. wear yellow, vs. clear, vs. orange droplets on their exines?  Physical size may be your best best.  Make a pollen library of each species and then measure the grains to see if their dimensions are distinct.  Apply this measurements to the bee pollen loads.

        What are you using as a pollen stain?  Our lab prefers Calberla's fluid.  By staining the exine pink-red you can often see distinctions in the shape of colpi, pores and/or opercula.  You will also note that the grains of some species have a thicker wall than others.  Staining allows you to focus on finer sculpture details of the tectum at higher magnification.  Staining permitted my student, Beth Winkler, to discriminate between the pollen grains of three Potentilla spp. carried by bees in Oregon.  You might want to contact Beth yourself <nogeboo@...>.

        Peter Bernhardt  

        On Wed, Nov 12, 2008 at 11:40 AM, Kim McFarland <megachilidae@...> wrote:

        Hi Bee Folks,

        Has anyone found a way to tell pollen from different Lupine species
        apart (once it is separated from the flower)? I will be looking at
        pollen loads taken off scopae and (hopefully) identifying the pollen
        grains to species when possible. I know Lupine pollen is difficult if
        not impossible to distinguish between species by just looking at the
        external structure. Does anyone know of any magic tricks to tell
        Lupine species apart?

        Thank you!

        Kim McFarland
        Humboldt State University


      • Retha Meier
        Kim, Please contact Peter Bernhardt at Saint Louis University. (314) 977-7152 or bernhap2@slu.edu Sincerely, Retha Meier
        Message 3 of 4 , Nov 19, 2008
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          Kim,
           
          Please contact Peter Bernhardt at Saint Louis University.  (314) 977-7152 or bernhap2@...
           
          Sincerely,
           
          Retha Meier

          On Wed, Nov 12, 2008 at 11:40 AM, Kim McFarland <megachilidae@...> wrote:

          Hi Bee Folks,

          Has anyone found a way to tell pollen from different Lupine species
          apart (once it is separated from the flower)? I will be looking at
          pollen loads taken off scopae and (hopefully) identifying the pollen
          grains to species when possible. I know Lupine pollen is difficult if
          not impossible to distinguish between species by just looking at the
          external structure. Does anyone know of any magic tricks to tell
          Lupine species apart?

          Thank you!

          Kim McFarland
          Humboldt State University


        • Peter Bernhardt
          Dear Retha: I answered Kim s message last week. She never replied. I wonder if she got it? Peter
          Message 4 of 4 , Nov 19, 2008
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            Dear Retha:

            I answered Kim's message last week.  She never replied.  I wonder if she got it?

            Peter

            On Wed, Nov 19, 2008 at 12:49 PM, Retha Meier <rmeier2@...> wrote:

            Kim,
             
            Please contact Peter Bernhardt at Saint Louis University.  (314) 977-7152 or bernhap2@...
             
            Sincerely,
             
            Retha Meier

            On Wed, Nov 12, 2008 at 11:40 AM, Kim McFarland <megachilidae@...> wrote:

            Hi Bee Folks,

            Has anyone found a way to tell pollen from different Lupine species
            apart (once it is separated from the flower)? I will be looking at
            pollen loads taken off scopae and (hopefully) identifying the pollen
            grains to species when possible. I know Lupine pollen is difficult if
            not impossible to distinguish between species by just looking at the
            external structure. Does anyone know of any magic tricks to tell
            Lupine species apart?

            Thank you!

            Kim McFarland
            Humboldt State University



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