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Re: [beemonitoring] monitoring bee phenology with trap nests

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  • Eric Mader
    Jim, Your comments got me thinking… How widespread is parsivoltinism among megachilids? For those of us doing this kind of trap nesting, is there any easy
    Message 1 of 3 , Sep 2, 2008
      Jim,

      Your comments got me thinkingÂ…

      How widespread is parsivoltinism among megachilids?

      For those of us doing this kind of trap nesting, is there any easy
      (non-x-ray) way to distinguish dead cocoons from parsivoltine species
      (besides observing them over several seasons)?

      Thanks for your thoughts!

      -Eric



      On 9/2/08 11:36 AM, "Cane, Jim" <Jim.Cane@...> wrote:


      Sam- I too rear trap nests through to adulthood, then take one of the
      early-emerging males to sacrifice for the ID, leaving me with the other
      males and all the females to fly. If you have Osmia, they overwinter as
      adults anyway, which is handy, as you can dissect them right out of the
      cocoon. For most other genera, your reward will be delayed, but they can
      be simply wintered at outdoor temps. If you want them to then nest, leave
      them at ambient temps to emerge naturally in their season of flight. If
      all will be sacrificed, then most will have satisfied their chill
      requirements by spring and can be brought indoors to emerge then. The gel
      caps just help to keep everybody straight and avoid the need for
      individual containment of nest straws/sticks. Also, you can write on the
      gel caps with Sharpies for whatever ID code system you are using. You
      could just as easily use vials, they are simply more bulky, or as I think
      about it, crimped pieces of clear plastic straws.

      Yours,

      jim

      ===============================
      James H. Cane
      USDA-ARS Bee Biology and Systematics Lab
      Utah State University, Logan, UT 84322 USA
      tel: 435-797-3879 FAX: 435-797-0461
      email: Jim.Cane@...
      web page: www.ars.usda.gov/npa/beelab

      "Embrace entropy"

      ______________________________________________________

      Eric Mader
      Pollinator Outreach Coordinator
      The Xerces Society
      PO Box 8833 Madison, WI, 53708 USA
      Tel: 608-628-4951 Fax: 503-233-6794
      Email: eric@...

      The Xerces Society is an international nonprofit organization that
      protects wildlife through the conservation of invertebrates and their
      habitat. To join the Society, make a contribution, or read about our work,
      please visit www.xerces.org.
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