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Mosquito Authority and bees

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  • Susan Gitlin
    All -- Thank you for the messages thus far regarding the impact of anti-mosquito spraying on bees. Please keep them coming! The company, Mosquito Authority,
    Message 1 of 10 , Aug 25 8:50 PM
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      All -- Thank you for the messages thus far regarding the impact of anti-mosquito spraying on bees.  Please keep them coming!

      The company, Mosquito Authority, has confirmed that they use bifenthrin, which is known to be highly toxic to bees as well as to aquatic life.   Today someone told me that if a Mosquito Authority applicator sees bees, he'll spray the area with water to shoo away the bees, and then they spray the plants with the bifenthrin.  

      What are your thoughts on the effectiveness of the approach to protecting bees?  I'm dubious, but perhaps I should give them the benefit of the doubt.

      The owner of the northern Virginia franchise has offered to meet and talk this week.  I'd like to be as informed about this issue as possible before the meeting.

      Keep the info coming!

      Thanks.

      -- Susan
    • <treetops5@...>
      Shooing might work for large bees that can easily be spotted, but the majority of native bees are more challenging to find, as they’re less than a ¼ of an
      Message 2 of 10 , Aug 26 6:44 AM
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        Shooing might work for large bees that can easily be spotted, but the majority of native bees are more challenging to find, as they’re less than a ¼ of an inch. Also, have their staff been trained to recognize non-Apis looking bees?

         

        Logically it seems the most effective times to spray would be dusk and dawn. Spaying during these periods, would greatly reduce the chances of inadvertently covering most bee species with bifenthrin. From a practical standpoint though, home owners probably wouldn’t be too keen on having strangers ‘lurking’ in their gardens at those hours. If it’s a scheduled visit though, then .  . .

         

        How about installing bat houses instead?

         

        Lisa Kuder

         

        From: beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com [mailto:beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Susan Gitlin susan.mclaughlin@... [beemonitoring]
        Sent: Monday, August 25, 2014 11:51 PM
        To: beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com; ARMN
        Subject: [beemonitoring] Mosquito Authority and bees

         

         

        All -- Thank you for the messages thus far regarding the impact of anti-mosquito spraying on bees.  Please keep them coming!

         

        The company, Mosquito Authority, has confirmed that they use bifenthrin, which is known to be highly toxic to bees as well as to aquatic life.   Today someone told me that if a Mosquito Authority applicator sees bees, he'll spray the area with water to shoo away the bees, and then they spray the plants with the bifenthrin.  

         

        What are your thoughts on the effectiveness of the approach to protecting bees?  I'm dubious, but perhaps I should give them the benefit of the doubt.

         

        The owner of the northern Virginia franchise has offered to meet and talk this week.  I'd like to be as informed about this issue as possible before the meeting.

         

        Keep the info coming!

         

        Thanks.

         

        -- Susan

      • askartie@...
        Ah, if only it were so easy as putting up bat boxes. Unfortunately the whole bats can eat thousands of mosquitoes in a night is somewhat of a myth. Sure,
        Message 3 of 10 , Aug 26 9:22 AM
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          Ah, if only it were so easy as putting up bat boxes.  Unfortunately the whole "bats can eat thousands of mosquitoes in a night" is somewhat of a myth.  Sure, in a room full of nothing but mosquitoes you bet they will eat their fill - I probably would also if I were stuck in a room with nothing else to eat.  But in the real world there is a lot more to eat than just mosquitoes, and bats, being the smart mammals that they are, will go for optimal foraging whenever possible.  A nice noctuid moth is more like a piece of steak (or eggplant for you vegetarians), whereas a mosquito is like a piece of popcorn.  Given the choice, a bat will pick the steak instead of the popcorn whenever possible - more bug for the buck.  I still encourage installing bat boxes - they are fascinating mammals and great to have around, plus the bat boxes sometimes make great hymenopteran hideouts as well.  However, don't count on bats to solve your mosquito population problems.
           
          Meanwhile, on the subject of barrier sprays for mosquitoes using bifenthrin (and other related pyrethroids), yes these are toxic to bees and other pollinators.  Best practices would suggest that the applicator avoid flowering plants during the treatment, applying the barrier instead to the shady foliage where the mosquitoes seek harborage from the heat of the mid-day sun.  However, this is not a requirement of the label, and in the world of pesticide application, "the label is the law."  The gentleman was not in violation of any law by spraying the flowers.  Unfortunately, most people looking for barrier applications in their yards are not concerned about the non-target effects of the mosquito control application - to many of our neighbors, nature is a scary place and the only good insect is a dead insect.  Susan, when you meet with the franchiser, you might suggest that they avoid spraying plants that are currently in bloom and focus their efforts instead primarily on harborage foliage. 
           
          Mike
           
           
           
           
          Michael “Doc” Weissmann, Ph.D.
          Chief Entomologist
          Colorado Mosquito Control
          7000 Broadway, Suite 108
          Denver, Colorado  80221 USA
          NEW PHONE: 303-428-5908 or toll free at 877-276-4306
          Cell: 303-944-9552; Fax: 866-929-1204
          E-mail: dweissmann@... or AskArtie@...
          Website: www.comosquitocontrol.com     
           
           
          -----Original Message-----
          From: treetops5@... [beemonitoring] <beemonitoring-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
          To: 'Susan Gitlin' <susan.mclaughlin@...>; beemonitoring <beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com>; 'ARMN' <armn@...>
          Sent: Tue, Aug 26, 2014 7:44 am
          Subject: RE: [beemonitoring] Mosquito Authority and bees



          Shooing might work for large bees that can easily be spotted, but the majority of native bees are more challenging to find, as they’re less than a ¼ of an inch. Also, have their staff been trained to recognize non-Apis looking bees?
           
          Logically it seems the most effective times to spray would be dusk and dawn. Spaying during these periods, would greatly reduce the chances of inadvertently covering most bee species with bifenthrin. From a practical standpoint though, home owners probably wouldn’t be too keen on having strangers ‘lurking’ in their gardens at those hours. If it’s a scheduled visit though, then .  . .
           
          How about installing bat houses instead?
           
          Lisa Kuder
           
          From: beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com [mailto:beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Susan Gitlin susan.mclaughlin@... [beemonitoring]
          Sent: Monday, August 25, 2014 11:51 PM
          To: beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com; ARMN
          Subject: [beemonitoring] Mosquito Authority and bees
           
           
          All -- Thank you for the messages thus far regarding the impact of anti-mosquito spraying on bees.  Please keep them coming!
           
          The company, Mosquito Authority, has confirmed that they use bifenthrin, which is known to be highly toxic to bees as well as to aquatic life.   Today someone told me that if a Mosquito Authority applicator sees bees, he'll spray the area with water to shoo away the bees, and then they spray the plants with the bifenthrin.  
           
          What are your thoughts on the effectiveness of the approach to protecting bees?  I'm dubious, but perhaps I should give them the benefit of the doubt.
           
          The owner of the northern Virginia franchise has offered to meet and talk this week.  I'd like to be as informed about this issue as possible before the meeting.
           
          Keep the info coming!
           
          Thanks.
           
          -- Susan


        • pollinator2001
          The label for Bifenthrin Golf & Nursery 7.9F, and the label for Bifenthrin I/T 7.9 F both state: This product is highly toxic to bees exposed to direct
          Message 4 of 10 , Aug 26 9:20 PM
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            The label for Bifenthrin Golf & Nursery 7.9F, and the label for Bifenthrin I/T 7.9 F both state:

            "This product is highly toxic to bees exposed to direct treatment or residues on blooming crops or weeds. Do not apply this product or allow to drift to blooming crops if bees are visiting the treatment area."

            This is a clearcut violation - because bees WILL be visiting within the residual life of the material. Shooing them away or spraying water is irrelevant. 

            You do not need to be negotiating with these people. You need to lay down the law - the label IS the law.

            And you need to get into contact with your pesticide cops and insist that they enforce the law.

            For a flow chart that simplifies the label directions for bees, see:  http://pollinator.com/pesticides/flowchart.htm

            Dave Green
            Retired pollination contractor



            ---In beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com, <susan.mclaughlin@...> wrote :

            All -- Thank you for the messages thus far regarding the impact of anti-mosquito spraying on bees.  Please keep them coming!

            The company, Mosquito Authority, has confirmed that they use bifenthrin, which is known to be highly toxic to bees as well as to aquatic life.   Today someone told me that if a Mosquito Authority applicator sees bees, he'll spray the area with water to shoo away the bees, and then they spray the plants with the bifenthrin.  

            What are your thoughts on the effectiveness of the approach to protecting bees?  I'm dubious, but perhaps I should give them the benefit of the doubt.

            The owner of the northern Virginia franchise has offered to meet and talk this week.  I'd like to be as informed about this issue as possible before the meeting.

            Keep the info coming!

            Thanks.

            -- Susan
          • Crumbling, Deana
            FYI to all, To find the agency to report pesticide use violations: go to the National Pesticide Information Center:
            Message 5 of 10 , Aug 27 6:16 AM
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              FYI to all,

               

              To find the agency to report pesticide use violations: go to the National Pesticide Information Center: http://npic.orst.edu/reg/state_agencies.html

               

              Info/instructions from that webpage:

              Individuals applying pesticides must do so in a manner not only consistent with federal laws, but also consistent with state laws and regulations, which differ from state to state. Additionally, the agency with primary responsibility for regulating pesticide use differs in each state. This guide provides links to phone numbers, addresses, and web sites for the primary pesticide regulatory agency in each state and US territory.

              It is important to consult with your state pesticide regulatory agency in the following circumstances:

              ·         To inquire if a pesticide is registered for use in your state

              ·         To find out more about the rules and regulations governing pesticide use in your state

              ·         To find out if your state requires notification or postings prior to pesticide applications

              ·         To register a complaint concerning a pesticide misapplication

              ·         To find out how to become a certified pesticide applicator

              ·         To report a pesticide exposure or misuse at work

              --Deana

               

              From: beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com [mailto:beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com]
              Sent: Wednesday, August 27, 2014 12:21 AM
              To: beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: [beemonitoring] Re: Mosquito Authority and bees

               

               

              The label for Bifenthrin Golf & Nursery 7.9F, and the label for Bifenthrin I/T 7.9 F both state:

               

              "This product is highly toxic to bees exposed to direct treatment or residues on blooming crops or weeds. Do not apply this product or allow to drift to blooming crops if bees are visiting the treatment area."

               

              This is a clearcut violation - because bees WILL be visiting within the residual life of the material. Shooing them away or spraying water is irrelevant. 

               

              You do not need to be negotiating with these people. You need to lay down the law - the label IS the law.

               

              And you need to get into contact with your pesticide cops and insist that they enforce the law.

               

              For a flow chart that simplifies the label directions for bees, see:  http://pollinator.com/pesticides/flowchart.htm



              Dave Green

              Retired pollination contractor

               



              ---In beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com, <susan.mclaughlin@...> wrote :

              All -- Thank you for the messages thus far regarding the impact of anti-mosquito spraying on bees.  Please keep them coming!

               

              The company, Mosquito Authority, has confirmed that they use bifenthrin, which is known to be highly toxic to bees as well as to aquatic life.   Today someone told me that if a Mosquito Authority applicator sees bees, he'll spray the area with water to shoo away the bees, and then they spray the plants with the bifenthrin.  

               

              What are your thoughts on the effectiveness of the approach to protecting bees?  I'm dubious, but perhaps I should give them the benefit of the doubt.

               

              The owner of the northern Virginia franchi se has offered to meet and talk this week.  I'd like to be as informed about this issue as possible before the meeting.

               

              Keep the info coming!

               

              Thanks.

               

              -- Susan

            • askartie@...
              I agree. If they are using Bifenthrin Golf & Nursery 7.9F (labeled for use on pests that feed on ornamental plants) or Bifenthrin I/T 7.9F (for use against
              Message 6 of 10 , Aug 27 6:19 AM
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                I agree.  If they are using Bifenthrin Golf & Nursery 7.9F (labeled for use on pests that feed on ornamental plants) or Bifenthrin I/T 7.9F (for use against termites), neither formulation is labeled for use against mosquitoes and therefore they are in violation of the law.  However, I highly doubt that either of these formulations is being used by Mosquito Authority as a barrier treatment for mosquitoes.  If so, they are not only violating the label, but they are not using the right formulation.  Not all bifenthrin is the same, with different dilutions and formulations labeled for different uses.  They are more likely using a formulation that is labeled against mosquitoes (for example, Talstar P).  The Environmental Hazards section of the Talstar label also states "This product is highly toxic to bees exposed to direct treatment or residues on blooming crops and weeds.  Do not apply this product or allow to drift to blooming crops if bees are visiting the treatment area."  Since the word "crops" is used, there is no violation of the label when spraying flowers as part of a landscape - this label is written to protect pollinators on crops, but unfortunately does not extend such protection to pollinators on all flowers.  However, even though they are not breaking any laws by spraying the landscape flowers, they are still unnecessarily killing non-target insects.  Best practices would be that they avoid all flowering plants and only spray harborage foliage where the mosquitoes hide from the sun during daylight hours. 
                 
                If you read the Talstar P label, you will also notice that one of the "pests" listed is bees!  That shows the level of anti-insect attitude among many of our fellow travelers on this planet.  I've often been to outdoor parties where I've seen people freak out at the presence of any insect, beneficial or not.  Our work as educators has a long way to go.
                 
                Mike
                 
                 
                 
                Michael “Doc” Weissmann, Ph.D.
                Chief Entomologist
                Colorado Mosquito Control
                7000 Broadway, Suite 108
                Denver, Colorado  80221 USA
                NEW PHONE: 303-428-5908 or toll free at 877-276-4306
                Cell: 303-944-9552; Fax: 866-929-1204
                E-mail: dweissmann@... or AskArtie@...
                Website: www.comosquitocontrol.com     
                 
                 
                In a message dated 8/26/2014 10:20:47 P.M. Mountain Daylight Time, beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com writes:



                The label for Bifenthrin Golf & Nursery 7.9F, and the label for Bifenthrin I/T 7.9 F both state:

                "This product is highly toxic to bees exposed to direct treatment or residues on blooming crops or weeds. Do not apply this product or allow to drift to blooming crops if bees are visiting the treatment area."

                This is a clearcut violation - because bees WILL be visiting within the residual life of the material. Shooing them away or spraying water is irrelevant. 

                You do not need to be negotiating with these people. You need to lay down the law - the label IS the law.

                And you need to get into contact with your pesticide cops and insist that they enforce the law.

                For a flow chart that simplifies the label directions for bees, see:  http://pollinator.com/pesticides/flowchart.htm

                Da ve Green
                Retired pollination contractor



                ---In beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com, <susan.mclaughlin@...> wrote :

                All -- Thank you for the messages thus far regarding the impact of anti-mosquito spraying on bees.  Please keep them coming!

                The company, Mosquito Authority, has confirmed that they use bifenthrin, which is known to be highly toxic to bees as well as to aquatic life.   Today someone told me that if a Mosquito Authority applicator sees bees, he'll spray the area with water to shoo away the bees, and then they spray the plants with the bifenthrin.  

                What are your thoughts on the effectiveness of the approach to protecting bees?  I'm dubious, but perhaps I should give them the benefit of the doubt.

                The owner of the northern Virginia franchise has of fered to meet and talk this week.  I'd like to be as informed about this issue as possible before the meeting.

                Keep the info coming!

                Thanks.

                -- Susan
              • Susan Gitlin
                All -- The information and thoughts you are sending my way continue to be very helpful. Thanks so much. Here s the label for the bifenthrin that Mosquito
                Message 7 of 10 , Aug 29 6:40 AM
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                  All -- The information and thoughts you are sending my way continue to be very helpful.  Thanks so much.

                  Here's the label for the bifenthrin that Mosquito Authority is using:  http://masterline.com/product-documents/14678 .  

                  It seems to allow a great deal of flexibility for use on a homeowner's plants.  I see nothing on it that would prevent someone from spraying anyone's residential yard at any time of day or whether flowers were on the plants or not.  

                  If I were a neighbor and had a garden with blooming squash plants, say, perhaps I would have cause to complain to the powers that be if I saw that an applicator allowed the spray to drift into my yard.  But that's only if the authorities deemed my garden to be called "crops."

                  If you disagree with my interpretation of the label, or if you see language that I missed, PLEASE let me know.

                  What it SHOULD read and what it DOES read are two very different questions, both of which need to be addressed, in different stages.

                  Thanks again.

                  -- Susan
                • Susan Gitlin
                  I used poor wording in my last email and it requires clarification: The companies cannot spray on private property unless invited by the homeowner. But once
                  Message 8 of 10 , Aug 29 7:01 AM
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                    I used poor wording in my last email and it requires clarification:

                    The companies cannot spray on private property unless invited by the homeowner.  But once invited/hired, there are few limitations on what they can spray within that yard.



                    ---------- Forwarded message ----------
                    From: Susan Gitlin <susan.mclaughlin@...>
                    Date: Fri, Aug 29, 2014 at 9:40 AM
                    Subject: Re: Mosquito Authority and bees
                    To: beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com


                    All -- The information and thoughts you are sending my way continue to be very helpful.  Thanks so much.

                    Here's the label for the bifenthrin that Mosquito Authority is using:  http://masterline.com/product-documents/14678 .  

                    It seems to allow a great deal of flexibility for use on a homeowner's plants.  I see nothing on it that would prevent someone from spraying anyone's residential yard at any time of day or whether flowers were on the plants or not.  

                    If I were a neighbor and had a garden with blooming squash plants, say, perhaps I would have cause to complain to the powers that be if I saw that an applicator allowed the spray to drift into my yard.  But that's only if the authorities deemed my garden to be called "crops."

                    If you disagree with my interpretation of the label, or if you see language that I missed, PLEASE let me know.

                    What it SHOULD read and what it DOES read are two very different questions, both of which need to be addressed, in different stages.

                    Thanks again.

                    -- Susan

                  • pollinator2001
                    The two labels I supplied are the only ones I could find. I m glad to see this one, as it contains the same warning for bees. The artificial distinction
                    Message 9 of 10 , Aug 29 10:05 AM
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                      The two labels I supplied are the only ones I could find. I'm glad to see this one, as it contains the same warning for bees.

                      The artificial distinction between "crop" and "ornamental" is disingenuous. Note that the label also includes "weeds."

                      A "crop" is a cultivated and wanted plant. A "weed" is an unwanted and uncultivated plant. Bees are protected on both of them.

                      The artificial construct of "crop" vs. "ornamental" is just a run-around to evade responsibility.

                      You see what our pollinators are up against!

                      Dave Green
                      Retired pollination contractor
                    • Lisa Horth
                      Susan, Deana s message - indicates that individual state s clearly play an important role in this issue. Since I also live in Virginia, I wanted to know more
                      Message 10 of 10 , Aug 29 4:50 PM
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                        Susan,

                        Deana's message - indicates that individual state's clearly play an important role in this issue. Since I also live in Virginia, I wanted to know more and I hope this helps.

                        I searched "Pesticide Regulator Virginia" and found the below information (that which is cut and pasted below my written comments here), which went to two links that generate errors (outdated maybe).

                        However, I also found this very valuable information in another search: 

                        http://www.vdacs.virginia.gov/about/directory-cp.shtml list of folks at VDACS including: 
                        "Pesticide Services General Information (804.786.3798),  
                        Private Applicator Information 804.371.0209 (joan.hammond@...), 
                        COMPLIANCE (804.371.8485 rohan.williams@...), 
                        Enforcement and Field Operations (804.371.6560 barbara.elliotte@...
                        and individual investigators (For  Fairfax: 703.324.5321 ryan.rutherford@...).

                        Our state apiarist is Keith Tignor (keith.tignor@...) at VDACS. He is a great guy, very knowledgeable and very helpful (also very, very busy).

                        My experience with VDACS has been great - I hope they can help you further.

                        Lisa



                        Pest Control Regulatory Agencies
                        Listed Alphabetically by State

                        This list of agencies in the U.S. which regulate and license pest control is provided for your reference. It includes the regulatory agency by name, address, phone number, fax number if available, and the link(s) to their web site if they have one.

                        The Web sites of state pest control regulatory agencies often have links to valuable information from many sources including colleges, universities, agricultural extension services, publishers, etc. Visit the sites in states other than your own to see what they have to offer.


                        Link to VA information:

                        Virginia
                        Virginia Department of Agriculture & Consumer Services

                        Division of Product & Industry Regulation
                        Office of Pesticide Services
                        P.O. Box 1163, Rm. 403
                        Richmond, VA 23209
                        804-371-6558
                        804-371-8598 (Fax)

                        WEB:
                        Dept. of Agriculture:
                        http://www.state.va.us/~vdacs/vdacs.htm

                        Office of Pesticide Services:
                        http://www.state.va.us/~vdacs/ops/opspg1.htm

                        TOP |



                        On Wed, Aug 27, 2014 at 9:16 AM, 'Crumbling, Deana' crumbling.deana@... [beemonitoring] <beemonitoring-noreply@yahoogroups.com> wrote:
                         

                        FYI to all,

                         

                        To find the agency to report pesticide use violations: go to the National Pesticide Information Center: http://npic.orst.edu/reg/state_agencies.html

                         

                        Info/instructions from that webpage:

                        Individuals applying pesticides must do so in a manner not only consistent with federal laws, but also consistent with state laws and regulations, which differ from state to state. Additionally, the agency with primary responsibility for regulating pesticide use differs in each state. This guide provides links to phone numbers, addresses, and web sites for the primary pesticide regulatory agency in each state and US territory.

                        It is important to consult with your state pesticide regulatory agency in the following circumstances:

                        ·         To inquire if a pesticide is registered for use in your state

                        ·         To find out more about the rules and regulations governing pesticide use in your state

                        ·         To find out if your state requires notification or postings prior to pesticide applications

                        ·         To register a complaint concerning a pesticide misapplication

                        ·         To find out how to become a certified pesticide applicator

                        ·         To report a pesticide exposure or misuse at work

                        --Deana

                         

                        From: beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com [mailto:beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com]
                        Sent: Wednesday, August 27, 2014 12:21 AM
                        To: beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com
                        Subject: [beemonitoring] Re: Mosquito Authority and bees

                         

                         

                        The label for Bifenthrin Golf & Nursery 7.9F, and the label for Bifenthrin I/T 7.9 F both state:

                         

                        "This product is highly toxic to bees exposed to direct treatment or residues on blooming crops or weeds. Do not apply this product or allow to drift to blooming crops if bees are visiting the treatment area."

                         

                        This is a clearcut violation - because bees WILL be visiting within the residual life of the material. Shooing them away or spraying water is irrelevant. 

                         

                        You do not need to be negotiating with these people. You need to lay down the law - the label IS the law.

                         

                        And you need to get into contact with your pesticide cops and insist that they enforce the law.

                         

                        For a flow chart that simplifies the label directions for bees, see:  http://pollinator.com/pesticides/flowchart.htm



                        Dave Green

                        Retired pollination contractor

                         



                        ---In beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com, <susan.mclaughlin@...> wrote :

                        All -- Thank you for the messages thus far regarding the impact of anti-mosquito spraying on bees.  Please keep them coming!

                         

                        The company, Mosquito Authority, has confirmed that they use bifenthrin, which is known to be highly toxic to bees as well as to aquatic life.   Today someone told me that if a Mosquito Authority applicator sees bees, he'll spray the area with water to shoo away the bees, and then they spray the plants with the bifenthrin.  

                         

                        What are your thoughts on the effectiveness of the approach to protecting bees?  I'm dubious, but perhaps I should give them the benefit of the doubt.

                         

                        The owner of the northern Virginia franchi se has offered to meet and talk this week.  I'd like to be as informed about this issue as possible before the meeting.

                         

                        Keep the info coming!

                         

                        Thanks.

                         

                        -- Susan




                        --
                        Lisa Horth, PhD
                        Haupt Fellow
                        Smithsonian Gardens
                        Washington DC
                        (202) 633-5849
                                 &
                        Associate Professor
                        Dept of Biological Science
                        Old Dominion University
                        Norfolk, VA 23529
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