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"Flowers" of the Emerald Ash Tree Borer?

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  • Peter Bernhardt
    Dear Colleagues: If you believe the most recent article in the Science Section of the New York Times you will come to the conclusion that the Emerald Ash Tree
    Message 1 of 8 , Jul 2, 2014
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      Dear Colleagues:

      If you believe the most recent article in the Science Section of the New York Times you will come to the conclusion that the Emerald Ash Tree Borer (Agrilus planipennnis) will destroy 99% of mature ash trees in the central, United States.  See the following link.


      Perhaps we could be of use to state, federal or local programs to control infestations.  This rather pretty beetle (although, handsome is as handsome does) is a member of the family, Buprestidae.  In Australia, the buprestids are important flower beetles.  Many species are found on flowers (especially in the eucalyptus family, Myrtaceae) eating pollen and drinking nectar.  The various buprestids are often called jewel beetles because they are so brightly colored.  Here's a link to some nice photos.


      The literature on the emerald ash beetle suggests it is also a pollen and nectar feeder as an adult.  That is why they use giant purple sticky traps (known as Barneys; yeah, I know).  As in most insect dispersals it's the winged adult that travels the greatest distance.  I wonder if we might start making collections of the beetles as we examine local flora in bloom?  We need to know the following things and combine them into one manuscript.

      1) Number of beetles observed on flowers and date of observation.
      2)  Identification of flowers.
      3)  Color of flowers (to the human eye).  Using a UV lens camera would be nice but they are expensive.
      4)  Were the beetles observed en copula?  Supposedly, those purple sticky traps are full of beetles "doing it."
      5) Collection of pinned voucher specimens with locations.

      This could become a model for citizen science but let's discuss the possibilities before attempting anything.

      Peter   
    • Cane, Jim
      Peter and others- boopers (Buprestids) here in the US rarely visit flowers in my experience, esp big-bodied species. That is to say, with the following
      Message 2 of 8 , Jul 2, 2014
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        Peter and others- boopers (Buprestids) here in the US rarely visit flowers in my experience, esp big-bodied species.  That is to say, with the following exception, I’ve not seen them at flowers (except maybe occasionally goldenrod) in 30 years, even in areas where they are otherwise numerous.  Among wood-boring beetles, I’ve more commonly encountered some species of cerambycid long-horned beetles at flowers.  The cool exception are the small Acmaeodera, which I see commonly at comps in se AZ in late summer, but the genus is Holarctic.  There are more than 100 species.  They are clever for a beetle, in that they can fly with their wing covers (forewings) closed, making them nimble and fast and often quite waspy looking at first glance, as reported in Science by Bob Silbergleid decades ago.  Do they eat pollen?  Do they pollinate?  How well?  I’d be interested if anyone knows for buprestids or cerambycids.  Maybe there are insights tucked in the literature.

         

        yours

         

        Jim

         

        ===============================

        James H. Cane

        USDA-ARS Pollinating Insect Research Unit

        Utah State University, Logan, UT 84322 USA

        tel: 435-797-3879   FAX: 435-797-0461

        email: Jim.Cane@... 

        web page: http://www.ars.usda.gov/Research/docs.htm?docid=18333

        publications: http://digitalcommons.usu.edu/piru/

        Gardening for Bees: http://extension.usu.edu/files/publications/factsheet/plants-pollinators09.pdf

         





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      • Riddle,T Charles
        All, There is there is a continuum of behavior among the Cerambycids, Scolytids, Buprestids and Curculionids. Lawrence Hanks at the university of Illinois has
        Message 3 of 8 , Jul 2, 2014
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          All,

          There is there is a continuum of behavior among the Cerambycids, Scolytids, Buprestids and Curculionids. Lawrence Hanks at the university of Illinois has some excellent publications on the Cerambycids. We (Russ Mizell/Charlie Riddle) have worked on weevils and Scolytids for a number of years. I also have not seen many metallic wood boring beetles on flowers. The thread that ties the behaviors together is plant health. While beetles like the red bay beetle and the emerald ash borer attack healthy trees many are attracted by odors released when a plant is stressed and will not normally attack healthy trees. We have looked at the persimmon borer and found botrytis spores on them. When you consider the ecology within flowers, I believe thrips also have to be included.  

          Charlie   

           

          From: beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com [mailto:beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of 'Cane, Jim' Jim.Cane@... [beemonitoring]
          Sent: Wednesday, July 02, 2014 11:06 AM
          To: beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: RE: [beemonitoring] "Flowers" of the Buprestidae?

           

           

          Peter and others- boopers (Buprestids) here in the US rarely visit flowers in my experience, esp big-bodied species.  That is to say, with the following exception, I’ve not seen them at flowers (except maybe occasionally goldenrod) in 30 years, even in areas where they are otherwise numerous.  Among wood-boring beetles, I’ve more commonly encountered some species of cerambycid long-horned beetles at flowers.  The cool exception are the small Acmaeodera, which I see commonly at comps in se AZ in late summer, but the genus is Holarctic.  There are more than 100 species.  They are clever for a beetle, in that they can fly with their wing covers (forewings) closed, making them nimble and fast and often quite waspy looking at first glance, as reported in Science by Bob Silbergleid decades ago.  Do they eat pollen?  Do they pollinate?  How well?  I’d be interested if anyone knows for buprestids or cerambycids.  Maybe there are insights tucked in the literature.

           

          yours

           

          Jim

           

          ===============================

          James H. Cane

          USDA-ARS Pollinating Insect Research Unit

          Utah State University, Logan, UT 84322 USA

          tel: 435-797-3879   FAX: 435-797-0461

          email: Jim.Cane@... 

          web page: http://www.ars.usda.gov/Research/docs.htm?docid=18333

          publications: http://digitalcommons.usu.edu/piru/

          Gardening for Bees: http://extension.usu.edu/files/publications/factsheet/plants-pollinators09.pdf

           





          This electronic message contains information generated by the USDA solely for the intended recipients. Any unauthorized interception of this message or the use or disclosure of the information it contains may violate the law and subject the violator to civil or criminal penalties. If you believe you have received this message in error, please notify the sender and delete the email immediately.

        • Doug Yanega
          My experience is the same as Jim s. The only bups one finds on flowers in the US, with very few exceptions, are Acmaeodera and Anthaxia. I will note that the
          Message 4 of 8 , Jul 2, 2014
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            My experience is the same as Jim's. The only bups one finds on flowers in the US, with very few exceptions, are Acmaeodera and Anthaxia. I will note that the "few exceptions" do include a few species of Agrilus I've taken on flowers of buckwheats (Eriogonum spp.) out west here. While Acmaeodera are fuzzy enough to potentially carryover some pollen from flower to flower, the other genera are not, and therefore highly unlikely to achieve pollination.

            Peace,
            -- 
            Doug Yanega      Dept. of Entomology       Entomology Research Museum
            Univ. of California, Riverside, CA 92521-0314     skype: dyanega
            phone: (951) 827-4315 (disclaimer: opinions are mine, not UCR's)
                         http://cache.ucr.edu/~heraty/yanega.html
              "There are some enterprises in which a careful disorderliness
                    is the true method" - Herman Melville, Moby Dick, Chap. 82
          • Jack Neff
            As Jim noted, American bupes (buprestids) are rarely encountered on flowers with the major exception of Acmaeodera, which can be quite common on flowers
            Message 5 of 8 , Jul 2, 2014
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              As Jim noted, American bupes (buprestids) are rarely encountered on flowers with the major exception of Acmaeodera, which can be quite common on flowers throughout the SW.  I assume they are either floral grazers or pollen feeders as they are common on comps but have very short mouthparts.  A currently popular bioassay for the presence of the elm ash borer, and other bupes, is to look at the nest provisions of Cerceris fumipennis, a common crabronid wasp which hunts bupes.  Unfortunately the wasps are rarely abundant enough to put any kind of a dent in ash borer populations. 

              best

              Jack
               
              John L. Neff
              Central Texas Melittological Institute
              7307 Running Rope
              Austin,TX 78731 USA
              512-345-7219


              On Wednesday, July 2, 2014 10:06 AM, "'Cane, Jim' Jim.Cane@... [beemonitoring]" <beemonitoring-noreply@yahoogroups.com> wrote:


               
              Peter and others- boopers (Buprestids) here in the US rarely visit flowers in my experience, esp big-bodied species.  That is to say, with the following exception, I’ve not seen them at flowers (except maybe occasionally goldenrod) in 30 years, even in areas where they are otherwise numerous.  Among wood-boring beetles, I’ve more commonly encountered some species of cerambycid long-horned beetles at flowers.  The cool exception are the small Acmaeodera, which I see commonly at comps in se AZ in late summer, but the genus is Holarctic.  There are more than 100 species.  They are clever for a beetle, in that they can fly with their wing covers (forewings) closed, making them nimble and fast and often quite waspy looking at first glance, as reported in Science by Bob Silbergleid decades ago.  Do they eat pollen?  Do they pollinate?  How well?  I’d be interested if anyone knows for buprestids or cerambycids.  Maybe there are insights tucked in the literature.
               
              yours
               
              Jim
               
              ===============================
              James H. Cane
              USDA-ARS Pollinating Insect Research Unit
              Utah State University, Logan, UT 84322 USA
              tel: 435-797-3879   FAX: 435-797-0461
              email: Jim.Cane@... 
              web page: http://www.ars.usda.gov/Research/docs.htm?docid=18333
              publications: http://digitalcommons.usu.edu/piru/
              Gardening for Bees: http://extension.usu.edu/files/publications/factsheet/plants-pollinators09.pdf
               




              This electronic message contains information generated by the USDA solely for the intended recipients. Any unauthorized interception of this message or the use or disclosure of the information it contains may violate the law and subject the violator to civil or criminal penalties. If you believe you have received this message in error, please notify the sender and delete the email immediately.


            • Cory Sheffield
              Hi all, I cannot remember the species, though there is a small buprestid in Nova Scotia (Middleton) that I caught routinely on buttercups (Ranunculus) and in
              Message 6 of 8 , Jul 2, 2014
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                Hi all,

                I cannot remember the species, though there is a small buprestid in Nova Scotia (Middleton) that I caught routinely on buttercups (Ranunculus) and in yellow pans.  Chris, do you know what this species was?  I believe at some point they did travel to you.

                Cheers,
                Cory


                On Wed, Jul 2, 2014 at 9:56 AM, 'Riddle,T Charles' tcri@... [beemonitoring] <beemonitoring-noreply@yahoogroups.com> wrote:
                 

                All,

                There is there is a continuum of behavior among the Cerambycids, Scolytids, Buprestids and Curculionids. Lawrence Hanks at the university of Illinois has some excellent publications on the Cerambycids. We (Russ Mizell/Charlie Riddle) have worked on weevils and Scolytids for a number of years. I also have not seen many metallic wood boring beetles on flowers. The thread that ties the behaviors together is plant health. While beetles like the red bay beetle and the emerald ash borer attack healthy trees many are attracted by odors released when a plant is stressed and will not normally attack healthy trees. We have looked at the persimmon borer and found botrytis spores on them. When you consider the ecology within flowers, I believe thrips also have to be included.  

                Charlie   

                 

                From: beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com [mailto:beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of 'Cane, Jim' Jim.Cane@... [beemonitoring]
                Sent: Wednesday, July 02, 2014 11:06 AM
                To: beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com
                Subject: RE: [beemonitoring] "Flowers" of the Buprestidae?

                 

                 

                Peter and others- boopers (Buprestids) here in the US rarely visit flowers in my experience, esp big-bodied species.  That is to say, with the following exception, I’ve not seen them at flowers (except maybe occasionally goldenrod) in 30 years, even in areas where they are otherwise numerous.  Among wood-boring beetles, I’ve more commonly encountered some species of cerambycid long-horned beetles at flowers.  The cool exception are the small Acmaeodera, which I see commonly at comps in se AZ in late summer, but the genus is Holarctic.  There are more than 100 species.  They are clever for a beetle, in that they can fly with their wing covers (forewings) closed, making them nimble and fast and often quite waspy looking at first glance, as reported in Science by Bob Silbergleid decades ago.  Do they eat pollen?  Do they pollinate?  How well?  I’d be interested if anyone knows for buprestids or cerambycids.  Maybe there are insights tucked in the literature.

                 

                yours

                 

                Jim

                 

                ===============================

                James H. Cane

                USDA-ARS Pollinating Insect Research Unit

                Utah State University, Logan, UT 84322 USA

                tel: 435-797-3879   FAX: 435-797-0461

                email: Jim.Cane@... 

                web page: http://www.ars.usda.gov/Research/docs.htm?docid=18333

                publications: http://digitalcommons.usu.edu/piru/

                Gardening for Bees: http://extension.usu.edu/files/publications/factsheet/plants-pollinators09.pdf

                 





                This electronic message contains information generated by the USDA solely for the intended recipients. Any unauthorized interception of this message or the use or disclosure of the information it contains may violate the law and subject the violator to civil or criminal penalties. If you believe you have received this message in error, please notify the sender and delete the email immediately.


              • Richard Patrock
                One other Bup genus that I ve recently collected on Indian Blanket is *Agrilaxia, *though this is in the same tribe Anthaxiini
                Message 7 of 8 , Jul 2, 2014
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                  One other Bup genus that I've recently collected on Indian Blanket is Agrilaxia, though this is in the same tribe Anthaxiini, as Anthaxia, that Doug mentioned earlier.  Besides, comps ,Acmaeodera  are very abundant in Opuntia and Oenothera flowers in South Texas.  I hadn't considered Bup size in relationship to flower activity but the ones I've seen in flowers tend to be in that middle (though sometimes small) range.  I'd considered this to be as much a reflection of where I collect and abundance/size relationship so hadn't given it much reflection.. I've seen much larger Meloids (these tend to be the largest beetles on flowers in my area), Scarabs and Cerambycids than Buprestids on flowers.  Most other beetle families that go to flowers are generally on the smaller side,I think.

                  --

                  ACCGTCCGTAGCATGCCGTRATATATTATCGATTTACGTATATCTCGAACGGTATA
                                                                         .
                  Richard Patrock                                                            
                  516 West Lee Ave.
                  Kingsville, TX 78363                                           

                  TGGCAGGCATCGTACGGCATSATATATTAGCTAAATGCATATAGAGCTTGCCATAT

                  Entropy isn’t what it used to be

                • kimberly huntzinger
                  Like Sam, we got a lot of the Acmaeodera bups in the bowl traps out West. To: beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com From: beemonitoring-noreply@yahoogroups.com Date:
                  Message 8 of 8 , Jul 2, 2014
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                    Like Sam, we got a lot of the Acmaeodera bups in the bowl traps out West.


                    To: beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com
                    From: beemonitoring-noreply@yahoogroups.com
                    Date: Wed, 2 Jul 2014 12:36:12 -0500
                    Subject: Re: [beemonitoring] "Flowers" of the Buprestidae?

                     

                    One other Bup genus that I've recently collected on Indian Blanket is Agrilaxia, though this is in the same tribe Anthaxiini, as Anthaxia, that Doug mentioned earlier.  Besides, comps ,Acmaeodera  are very abundant in Opuntia and Oenothera flowers in South Texas.  I hadn't considered Bup size in relationship to flower activity but the ones I've seen in flowers tend to be in that middle (though sometimes small) range.  I'd considered this to be as much a reflection of where I collect and abundance/size relationship so hadn't given it much reflection.. I've seen much larger Meloids (these tend to be the largest beetles on flowers in my area), Scarabs and Cerambycids than Buprestids on flowers.  Most other beetle families that go to flowers are generally on the smaller side,I think.

                    --

                    ACCGTCCGTAGCATGCCGTRATATATTATCGATTTACGTATATCTCGAACGGTATA
                                                                           .
                    Richard Patrock                                                            
                    516 West Lee Ave.
                    Kingsville, TX 78363                                           

                    TGGCAGGCATCGTACGGCATSATATATTAGCTAAATGCATATAGAGCTTGCCATAT

                    Entropy isn’t what it used to be


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