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ash pollen and neonicotinoids

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  • Liz Day
    A friend in Wisconsin who keeps honeybees is having her ash tree treated for Emerald Ash Borer by having the soil injected with neonicotinoids. She worries
    Message 1 of 5 , Jun 26, 2014
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      A friend in Wisconsin who keeps honeybees is having her ash tree
      treated for Emerald Ash Borer by having the soil injected with
      neonicotinoids. She worries that somehow the honeybees will have
      contact with the pesticide, via the (windblown) ash pollen or some
      other way. It's a large tree, and if it comes down to it, the tree
      will take precedence over the bees. She wonders if she should give them away.
      Any thoughts on whether there is a danger here?

      Thanks,
      Liz
      Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
    • kimberly huntzinger
      I found this info sheet on www.emeraldashborer.info Besides all the other info it shares there is specifically a section on honeybees (Pg.3).
      Message 2 of 5 , Jun 27, 2014
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        I found this info sheet on www.emeraldashborer.info

        Besides all the other info it shares there is specifically a section on honeybees (Pg.3).

        http://www.emeraldashborer.info/files/potential_side_effects_of_eab_insecticides_faq.pdf


        To: beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com
        From: beemonitoring-noreply@yahoogroups.com
        Date: Thu, 26 Jun 2014 23:11:13 -0400
        Subject: [beemonitoring] ash pollen and neonicotinoids

         
        A friend in Wisconsin who keeps honeybees is having her ash tree
        treated for Emerald Ash Borer by having the soil injected with
        neonicotinoids. She worries that somehow the honeybees will have
        contact with the pesticide, via the (windblown) ash pollen or some
        other way. It's a large tree, and if it comes down to it, the tree
        will take precedence over the bees. She wonders if she should give them away.
        Any thoughts on whether there is a danger here?

        Thanks,
        Liz
        Indianapolis, Indiana, USA


      • Stoner, Kimberly
        Hi all, Recent research by Reed Johnson of Ohio State has shown that honey bees do collect ash pollen, but only for a short time early in the spring. The most
        Message 3 of 5 , Jun 27, 2014
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          Hi all,

          Recent research by Reed Johnson of Ohio State has shown that honey bees do collect ash pollen, but only for a short time early in the spring.  The most important thing would be to make sure they have good alternative sources of clean pollen.

           

           

          From: beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com [mailto:beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of kimberly huntzinger kimberly_huntzinger@... [beemonitoring]
          Sent: Friday, June 27, 2014 9:16 AM
          To: Liz Day; Bee Monitoring Group
          Subject: RE: [beemonitoring] ash pollen and neonicotinoids

           

           

          I found this info sheet on www.emeraldashborer.info

          Besides all the other info it shares there is specifically a section on honeybees (Pg.3).

          http://www.emeraldashborer.info/files/potential_side_effects_of_eab_insecticides_faq.pdf


          To: beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com
          From: beemonitoring-noreply@yahoogroups.com
          Date: Thu, 26 Jun 2014 23:11:13 -0400
          Subject: [beemonitoring] ash pollen and neonicotinoids

           

          A friend in Wisconsin who keeps honeybees is having her ash tree
          treated for Emerald Ash Borer by having the soil injected with
          neonicotinoids. She worries that somehow the honeybees will have
          contact with the pesticide, via the (windblown) ash pollen or some
          other way. It's a large tree, and if it comes down to it, the tree
          will take precedence over the bees. She wonders if she should give them away.
          Any thoughts on whether there is a danger here?

          Thanks,
          Liz
          Indianapolis, Indiana, USA

        • Liz Day
          ... Says: Flowering plants that are pollinated by bees or other insects should not be planted immediately adjacent to ash or other trees that will be treated
          Message 4 of 5 , Jun 27, 2014
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            >http://www.emeraldashborer.info/files/potential_side_effects_of_eab_insecticides_faq.pdf
            >

            Says:
            Flowering plants that are pollinated by bees or
            other insects should not be planted immediately
            adjacent to ash or other trees that will be treated
            with systemic insecticides applied to the soil, as they
            may also absorb insecticide.

            It seems it must be important how far the insecticide moves in the soil...

            Liz
            Indianapolis
          • Liz Day
            My friend with the bee hives is now less worried about the bees, because it seems as though the ash pollen is only a minor risk. She says, I [worry] about how
            Message 5 of 5 , Jul 2, 2014
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              My friend with the bee hives is now less worried about the bees,
              because it seems as though the ash pollen is only a minor risk. She
              says, "I [worry] about how we'd have all these leaves full of neonic
              breakdown products in the compost bin. Research shows they impact
              shredding insects as well as decomposing microbes."

              Now she is looking into using neem oil on the emerald ash borers
              instead. It seems remarkable to me that a less toxic chemical would
              still work on EAB.

              Liz
              Indianapolis Indiana USA
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