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Final Production Version of Alien and Introduced Bees of North America north of Mexico

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  • Sam Droege
    All: Below is the version of the alien and introduced bees list that I plan to incorporate into the handy bee manual. Its about the same as the last time it
    Message 1 of 3 , Jul 3, 2008
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      All:

      Below is the version of the alien and introduced bees list that I plan to incorporate into the handy bee manual.  Its about the same as the last time it was posted to this list, but I wanted you to have the latest version.  I plan to keep this list as up to date as possible so will always be interested in an additions or clarifications to this list.   Thanks for all of your help and I will likely send out the latest version of the Handy Bee Manual to Dan Kjar and Gretchen LeBuhn sometime next week.  If anyone else is interested in hosting the manual that would be wonderful.  As always I am interested in hearing about additions and corrections to the handy bee manual.

      Thanks again.

      sam

                                                     
      Sam Droege  sdroege@...                      
      w 301-497-5840 h 301-390-7759 fax 301-497-5624
      USGS Patuxent Wildlife Research Center
      BARC-EAST, BLDG 308, RM 124 10300 Balt. Ave., Beltsville, MD  20705
      Http://www.pwrc.usgs.gov


      The bookful blockhead, ignorantly read,
      With loads of learned lumber in his head.
           -Alexander Pope




      North American (North of Mexico) Introduced and Alien Bee Species

      Information on distributions and status come from the literature, active North American collectors, online collection data available via the global mapper on www.discoverlife.org, and John Ascher’s compilation of distributional data.   Thanks for the contributions from Mike Arduser, John Ascher, Rob Jean, Jack Neff, Robbin Thorp.

      July 2008

      Account Layout:  I = purposely introduced, A = accidental introduction or possibly natural colonization (although this would be unlikely for most), Genus, Species, Decade of Establishment, Probable Source Population, Current Status in North America north of Mexico

      Apidae

      I Apis mellifera  1620.   Europe, Mediterranean region.  Feral colonies present throughout North America.  Colony numbers and persistence recently have declined following the introduction of parasitic mites in the 1980s and 1990s.  
      I Anthophora plumipes  1980.  Europe and southern China.  Introduced at the USDA Beltsville, MD Honey Bee Laboratory.  Numbers were initially low, but this species is now found commonly in early spring throughout the Washington D.C. metropolitan area where it nests in the ground under porches or in the dirt of uprooted trees and frequents planted azaleas and other garden flowers.  Has the potential to spread throughout North America.
      A Ceratina cobaltina 1970. Mexico. While it is possible this is simply a disjunct Texas population, specimens for this distinctive Mexican species were only recently discovered in Travis and Hidalgo counties.
      A Ceratina dallatoreana 1940. Mediterranean region.  Central California.
      I Ceratina smaragdula 1960.  Pakistan, India, SE Asia.  Introduced into California but not found since its introduction.
      A Centris nitida 2000.  Southwestern U.S., Texas, Mexico, Central America and Northwestern South America.   Recently discovered in southern Florida.  Not expected to spread outside of Florida.
      A Euglossa viridissima 2000. Mexico and Central America.   Recently discovered in southern Florida.  Currently found only on the eastern side of the state. Expected to spread to the western side but not invade much further north.
      A Xylocopa tabaniformis parkinsoniae Recent.  South Texas.  Recently appears to have left its historical haunts along the Rio Grande and now found commonly in urban areas of Central Texas, perhaps translocated there via firewood, but possibly colonized naturally.

      Andrenidae

      A Andrena wilkella 1900s.  Europe and northern Asia.  Common throughout the north central and northeastern U.S. and southern Canada.

      Colletidae
       
      A Hylaeus leptocephalus 1900.  Europe.  Found throughout the U.S. and southern Canada.  Particularly associated with gardens, urban and disturbed sites.  Often found on Melilotus.
      A Hylaeus hyalinatus 1990. Europe.  Currently found in urban areas from New York City and southern Ontario.  Has potential to spread throughout North America.
      A Hylaeus punctatus 1980.  Europe.  Currently found in central California, southern South America, New York City, and Washington D.C.  Has potential to spread throughout North America
       
      Halictidae

      A Lasioglossum eleutherense 1990.  Bahamas and Cuba.  Four individuals found in the University of Miami Arboretum.  Current status unknown.  Not expected to spread out of Florida.
      A Lasioglossum leucozonium 1900s.  Europe and northern China.  Despite its extensive range in Europe and Asia it is limited to the northern areas of central and eastern U.S. and southern Canada.
      A Halictus tectus 2000.  Southern Europe to Mongolia.  Known from 2 sites in downtown Philadelphia, PA and Beltsville, MD.  Appears to prefer highly disturbed sites with European weeds.

       Megachilidae

      A Anthidium manicatum 1960.  Europe, North Africa, Near East, South Central and South Eastern South America.  Currently found predominantly in northeastern U.S. and southern Canada, however, individuals have shown up in the central states, Idaho, and on the West Coast where it is well established in California.  Likely to spread throughout North America.  Associated with large urban and suburban gardens, particularly planted with Stachys.
      A Anthidium oblongatum 1990.  Europe and the Near East.  Currently common in northeastern U.S. and southern Canada and moving into the central states and provinces.  Found in most open habitats.  Has potential to spread throughout North America.
      A Chelostoma campanularum 1960.  Europe and the Near East.  Found in Upstate New York, Connecticut, and southern Ontario. Has potential to spread throughout North America.
      A Chelostoma rapunculi 1960.  Europe and the Near East.  Found in Upstate New York and southern Ontario. Has potential to spread throughout North America.
      A Coelioxys coturnix 2000.  Southwestern Europe, North Africa, India.  Currently found in the Baltimore-Washington D.C. corridor.  Has potential to spread throughout the range of Megachile rotundata (its presumed host).
      A Hoplitis anthocopoides 1960.  Europe.  Found from West Virginia to southern Ontario.  Potential spread perhaps limited to the range of its reported preferred pollen source, Viper’s Bugloss (Echium vulgare).
      A Lithurgus chrysurus 1970.  Europe, Near East, North Africa. Found only in Phillipsburg, New Jersey and Lehigh Gap, Pennsylvania.  Until 2007 there were no recent records, but perhaps due to nobody making an effort to look. Apparently oligolectic on Spotted Knapweed (Centaurea maculosa) and burrows into wood to make a nest.  This species has the potential to be much more destructive than Xylocopa virginica.  Pilot and scouting surveys to take place in 2008 for additional populations.
      A Megachile apicalis 1930.  Europe, North Africa, Near and Middle East.  Western and eastern U.S.   Relatively few records in the East but widespread in California and parts of the Pacific Northwest where it specializes on star-thistle Centaurea solstitialis, and is often moved around with Megachile rotundata pollinator tubes.
      A Megachile concinna 1940.  Africa.  West Indies, Mexico, throughout the southern U.S.
      A Megachile lanata 1700-1800.  India and China.  Introduced into the West Indies and northern South America where it possibly made its way secondarily to Florida.  Found throughout much of Florida but not likely to spread farther unless it is brought to the southwestern deserts.
      A Megachile rotundata 1920-1940.  Europe to China.  Throughout North America to northern Mexico.  Available commercially, used in alfalfa seed production.
      A Megachile sculpturalis 1990.  Far eastern China, Korea, Japan.   Eastern and central U.S. and southern Canada.  May move throughout the continent as they use widely planted, introduced summer blooming leguminous trees and shrubs.
      A Osmia caerulescens 1800s.  Europe, North Africa. Near East, India.  Northeastern and Northcentral U.S. and southern Canada. Appears to be less common than it once was, at least towards the south.  No recent records for the mid-Atlantic area despite a great deal of collecting, but still common in upstate New York.
      I Osmia cornifrons 1960.  Eastern China, Korea, and Japan.  Introduced to pollinate tree fruit crops.  Feral populations established in the Mid-Atlantic and Northeastern U.S.  Available commercially.
      I Osmia cornuta 1980.  Europe, North Africa, Near East.  Introduced as a pollinator of tree fruit crops in California, but its establishment has not been documented.
      A Osmia taurus 2000.  Eastern China, Japan.  Mid-Atlantic area and Appalachian Mountains.  Males in particular are very similar to O. cornifrons and may be confused.  Appears to be rapidly spreading and often abundant.  


      P Please don't print this e-mail unless really needed.
    • Cane, Jim
      Sam- regarding Osmia cornifrons, I gather that some fruit growers are using it and propagating it in Michigan, and Karen Strickler stumbled into them among
      Message 2 of 3 , Jul 3, 2008
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        Sam- regarding Osmia cornifrons, I gather that some fruit growers are using it and propagating it in Michigan, and Karen Strickler stumbled into them among populations Osmia lignaria trap-nested (I think) in the Portland OR area (Chris O’Toole bought the nests for his mass-rearing program of Oslig for almond pollination, recognized the “wrong” nests, informed Karen, and destroyed them).

         

        jim

         

        ===============================

        James H. Cane

        USDA-ARS Bee Biology and Systematics Lab

        Utah State University , Logan , UT 84322 USA

        tel: 435-797-3879   FAX: 435-797-0461

        email: Jim.Cane@... 

        web page: www.ars.usda.gov/npa/beelab

         

        "Embrace entropy"

         

      • Sam Droege
        Jim: Would it be safe to say: Osmia cornifrons 1960. Eastern China, Korea, and Japan. Introduced to pollinate tree fruit crops. Feral populations are
        Message 3 of 3 , Jul 3, 2008
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          Jim:

          Would it be safe to say:

           Osmia cornifrons 1960.  Eastern China, Korea, and Japan.  Introduced to pollinate tree fruit crops.  Feral populations are definitely established in the Mid-Atlantic and  Northeastern U.S. and possibly in the Upper Midwest and Northwestern U.S.  Available commercially.


          ?

          sam

                                                         
          Sam Droege  sdroege@...                      
          w 301-497-5840 h 301-390-7759 fax 301-497-5624
          USGS Patuxent Wildlife Research Center
          BARC-EAST, BLDG 308, RM 124 10300 Balt. Ave., Beltsville, MD  20705
          Http://www.pwrc.usgs.gov


          What Luck

          What luck I can pick
          berries in the wood
          I thought
          there is no wood no berries.


          What luck I can lie
          in the shade of a tree
          I thought trees
          no longer give shade.


          What luck I am with you
          my heart beats so
          I thought man
          has no heart.


          Tadeusz Rozewicz
          P Please don't print this e-mail unless really needed.


          "Cane, Jim" <Jim.Cane@...>
          Sent by: beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com

          07/03/2008 01:49 PM

          Please respond to
          beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com

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          RE: [beemonitoring] Final Production Version of Alien and Introduced Bees of North America north of Mexico





          Sam- regarding Osmia cornifrons, I gather that some fruit growers are using it and propagating it in Michigan, and Karen Strickler stumbled into them among populations Osmia lignaria trap-nested (I think) in the Portland OR area (Chris O’Toole bought the nests for his mass-rearing program of Oslig for almond pollination, recognized the “wrong” nests, informed Karen, and destroyed them).

           

          jim

           

          ===============================

          James H. Cane

          USDA-ARS Bee Biology and Systematics Lab

          Utah State University, Logan, UT 84322 USA

          tel: 435-797-3879   FAX: 435-797-0461

          email: Jim.Cane@...  

          web page: www.ars.usda.gov/npa/beelab

           

          "Embrace entropy"

           


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