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Megachile melanophaea in Michigan?

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  • Matthew Shepherd
    Hi, Some photos of a nesting aggregation in a sloping front yard were posted on Xerces’ Facebook page. The photos were taken in “mid west Michigan” and
    Message 1 of 2 , Jun 2, 2014

    Hi,

     

    Some photos of a nesting aggregation in a sloping front yard were posted on Xerces’ Facebook page. The photos were taken in “mid west Michigan” and clearly show a robust, hairy bee carrying a leaf piece into a ground nest. I’ve attached a couple of photos, but they may be scrubbed by the listserve’s computers. You should be able to see the photos on our Facebook page, https://www.facebook.com/pages/The-Xerces-Society/193182577358618, as a post by Natalie Beversluis. (Or I can send them to you directly.)

     

    The bees have massive jaws (appear to be tridentate), a dark head with some pale hairs, the thorax and the first couple of abdominal segments are covered in pale hairs, and the rest of the abdomen is dark.

     

    I believe the bees to be Megachile melanophaea, also called the black-and-gray leafcutter bee according to a few websites. Is this likely? Are there other ground-nesting megachilids in Michigan?

     

    Thanks!

     

    Matthew

     

    ________

     

    Matthew Shepherd, Communications Director

     

    The Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation     Protecting the Life that Sustains Us

     

    Stay in touch:     xerces.org          Facebook          E-newsletter          Twitter

     

    628 NE Broadway, Ste 200, Portland, OR 97232-1324, USA

    Tel: (503) 232-6639 ext. 110; Toll free: 1-855-232 6639 ext. 110; Cell: (503) 807-1577

    mdshepherd@...

     

    The Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation is an international nonprofit organization that protects wildlife through the conservation of invertebrates and their habitat. To join the Society, make a donation, or read about our work, please visit www.xerces.org.

     

     

  • Jason Gibbs
    Hi Matthew, We also have Megachile gemula and M. mucida in mid-Michigan, which both look similar. Jason On 2 June 2014 16:30, Matthew Shepherd
    Message 2 of 2 , Jun 2, 2014
    • 0 Attachment
      Hi Matthew,

      We also have Megachile gemula and M. mucida in mid-Michigan, which both look similar.

      Jason


      On 2 June 2014 16:30, Matthew Shepherd mdshepherd@... [beemonitoring] <beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com> wrote:
       
      [Attachment(s) from Matthew Shepherd included below]

      Hi,

       

      Some photos of a nesting aggregation in a sloping front yard were posted on Xerces’ Facebook page. The photos were taken in “mid west Michigan” and clearly show a robust, hairy bee carrying a leaf piece into a ground nest. I’ve attached a couple of photos, but they may be scrubbed by the listserve’s computers. You should be able to see the photos on our Facebook page, https://www.facebook.com/pages/The-Xerces-Society/193182577358618, as a post by Natalie Beversluis. (Or I can send them to you directly.)

       

      The bees have massive jaws (appear to be tridentate), a dark head with some pale hairs, the thorax and the first couple of abdominal segments are covered in pale hairs, and the rest of the abdomen is dark.

       

      I believe the bees to be Megachile melanophaea, also called the black-and-gray leafcutter bee according to a few websites. Is this likely? Are there other ground-nesting megachilids in Michigan?

       

      Thanks!

       

      Matthew

       

      ________

       

      Matthew Shepherd, Communications Director

       

      The Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation     Protecting the Life that Sustains Us

       

      Stay in touch:     xerces.org          Facebook          E-newsletter          Twitter

       

      628 NE Broadway, Ste 200, Portland, OR 97232-1324, USA

      Tel: (503) 232-6639 ext. 110; Toll free: 1-855-232 6639 ext. 110; Cell: (503) 807-1577

      mdshepherd@...

       

      The Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation is an international nonprofit organization that protects wildlife through the conservation of invertebrates and their habitat. To join the Society, make a donation, or read about our work, please visit www.xerces.org.

       

       




      --
      Jason Gibbs, PhD
      Research Associate
      Department of Entomology
      Michigan State University
      202 Center for Integrated Plant Systems
      East Lansing, MI, 48824, USA
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