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Rubus stems

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  • Cane, Jim
    Folks- I echo Jack s advice on reading the translated Fabre...books were widely published mid-20th century, so used copies (or library ones) are quite common.
    Message 1 of 4 , May 9, 2014

      Folks- I echo Jack’s advice on reading the translated Fabre…books were widely published mid-20th century, so used copies (or library ones) are quite common.  Try Powell’s on-line, for instance.  Here I have abundant Ceratina multiplying in cut Rubus stems, a lazy way to increase this bee by simply cutting off dead canes a foot high.  I have yet to see a leafcutter using them, but larger-diameter blackberry stems might hold more promise.  Insights, Logan?

       

      yours

       

      Jim Cane





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    • Logan Williams
      Jim, you are probably correct in your observations, especially as it pertains to Ceratina who create make their own holes. I typically drill my Rubus species
      Message 2 of 4 , May 9, 2014
        Jim, you are probably correct in your observations, especially as it pertains to Ceratina who create make their own holes.  I typically drill my Rubus species twigs (Raspberry and Blackberry) with different diameter bores to increase diversity of twig nesting Hymenoptera. I also leave some undrilled for Ceratina, Logan Williams, Raleigh NC
         
         
        -----Original Message-----
        From: 'Cane, Jim' Jim.Cane@... [beemonitoring] [beemonitoring] <beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com>
        To: beemonitoring <beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Fri, May 9, 2014 4:31 pm
        Subject: [beemonitoring] Rubus stems

         
        Folks- I echo Jack’s advice on reading the translated Fabre…books were widely published mid-20th century, so used copies (or library ones) are quite common.  Try Powell’s on-line, for instance.  Here I have abundant Ceratina multiplying in cut Rubus stems, a lazy way to increase this bee by simply cutting off dead canes a foot high.  I have yet to see a leafcutter using them, but larger-diameter blackberry stems might hold more promise.  Insights, Logan?
         
        yours
         
        Jim Cane




        This electronic message contains information generated by the USDA solely for the intended recipients. Any unauthorized interception of this message or the use or disclosure of the information it contains may violate the law and subject the violator to civil or criminal penalties. If you believe you have received this message in error, please notify the sender and delete the email immediately.
      • Crumbling, Deana
        I have Indian hemp (a dogbane) in my yard, which has tall stems that become hollow and stand strong through the winter. I accidently cut one and found a larval
        Message 3 of 4 , May 13, 2014

          I have Indian hemp (a dogbane) in my yard, which has tall stems that become hollow and stand strong through the winter. I accidently cut one and found a larval bee inside.  Has anyone looked at dogbanes for twig nesters? No thorns! The small flowers are popular with adult bees. Extremely easy (actually a little TOO easy) to propagate.

           

          Deana Crumbling

          Virginia

          From: beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com [mailto:beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com]
          Sent: Friday, May 09, 2014 8:48 PM
          To: beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: Re: [beemonitoring] Rubus stems

           

           

          Jim, you are probably correct in your observations, especially as it pertains to Ceratina who create make their own holes.  I typically drill my Rubus species twigs (Raspberry and Blackberry) with different diameter bores to increase diversity of twig nesting Hymenoptera. I also leave some undrilled for Ceratina, Logan Williams, Raleigh NC

           

           

          -----Original Message-----
          From: 'Cane, Jim' Jim.Cane@... [beemonitoring] [beemonitoring] <beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com>
          To: beemonitoring <beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com>
          Sent: Fri, May 9, 2014 4:31 pm
          Subject: [beemonitoring] Rubus stems

           

          Folks- I echo Jack’s advice on reading the translated Fabre…books were widely published mid-20th century, so used copies (or library ones) are quite common.  Try Powell’s on-line, for instance.  Here I have abundant Ceratina multiplying in cut Rubus stems, a lazy way to increase this bee by simply cutting off dead canes a foot high.  I have yet to see a leafcutter using them, but larger-diameter blackberry stems might hold more promise.  Insights, Logan?

           

          yours

           

          Jim Cane





          This electronic message contains information generated by the USDA solely for the intended recipients. Any unauthorized interception of this message or the use or disclosure of the information it contains may violate the law and subject the violator to civil or criminal penalties. If you believe you have received this message in error, please notify the sender and delete the email immediately.

        • Logan Williams
          Deana, I have not tried it but now that you bring it up I certainly will try it!! Thanks and by the way, I frequently see Coelioxys on the little flowers of
          Message 4 of 4 , May 13, 2014
            Deana, I have not tried it but now that you bring it up I certainly will try it!!  Thanks and by the way, I frequently see Coelioxys on the little flowers of dogbane around here in the piedmont of NC. 
             Logan Williams, Raleigh, NC
             
             
            -----Original Message-----
            From: 'Crumbling, Deana' crumbling.deana@... [beemonitoring] [beemonitoring] <beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com>
            To: beemonitoring <beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com>
            Sent: Tue, May 13, 2014 8:16 am
            Subject: RE: [beemonitoring] Rubus stems

             
            I have Indian hemp (a dogbane) in my yard, which has tall stems that become hollow and stand strong through the winter. I accidently cut one and found a larval bee inside.  Has anyone looked at dogbanes for twig nesters? No thorns! The small flowers are popular with adult bees. Extremely easy (actually a little TOO easy) to propagate.
             
            Deana Crumbling
            Virginia
            From: beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com [mailto:beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com]
            Sent: Friday, May 09, 2014 8:48 PM
            To: beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: Re: [beemonitoring] Rubus stems
             
             
            Jim, you are probably correct in your observations, especially as it pertains to Ceratina who create make their own holes.  I typically drill my Rubus species twigs (Raspberry and Blackberry) with different diameter bores to increase diversity of twig nesting Hymenoptera. I also leave some undrilled for Ceratina, Logan Williams, Raleigh NC
             
             
            -----Original Message-----
            From: 'Cane, Jim' Jim.Cane@... [beemonitoring] [beemonitoring] <beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com>
            To: beemonitoring <beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com>
            Sent: Fri, May 9, 2014 4:31 pm
            Subject: [beemonitoring] Rubus stems
             
            Folks- I echo Jack’s advice on reading the translated Fabre…books were widely published mid-20th century, so used copies (or library ones) are quite common.  Try Powell’s on-line, for instance.  Here I have abundant Ceratina multiplying in cut Rubus stems, a lazy way to increase this bee by simply cutting off dead canes a foot high.  I have yet to see a leafcutter using them, but larger-diameter blackberry stems might hold more promise.  Insights, Logan?
             
            yours
             
            Jim Cane




            This electronic message contains information generated by the USDA solely for the intended recipients. Any unauthorized interception of this message or the use or disclosure of the information it contains may violate the law and subject the violator to civil or criminal penalties. If you believe you have received this message in error, please notify the sender and delete the email immediately.
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