Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Paint choice for painting bee bowls

Expand Messages
  • John Klymko
    I d like to prepare a bunch of blue, yellow and white bee bowls, and I m wondering how much consideration I need to give to paint choice. Will any fluorescent
    Message 1 of 8 , May 7, 2014
      I'd like to prepare a bunch of blue, yellow and white bee bowls, and I'm wondering how much consideration I need to give to paint choice. Will any fluorescent yellow paint do the trick (assuming the paint works on plastic), or is it worth my time to invest in tried and true pigments? I've perused some of the old discussions on this, and some of the paints discussed might not be available in Canada.

      If this topic has already been covered ad nauseam I apologize, but I would appreciate it if you could steer me to those old posts!

      Cheers,
      John

      Zoologist
      Atlantic Canada Conservation Data Centre
      PO Box 6416, Sackville, NB E4L 1G6
      (506)364-2660(tel); (506)364-2656(fax)
      http://www.accdc.com 
    • Odo Natasaki
      This reminds me of a question I have had recently. Why aren t pink or purplish coloured bowls used? Has anyone done this and if so, what results were they?
      Message 2 of 8 , May 7, 2014
        This reminds me of a question I have had recently. Why aren't pink or
        "purplish" coloured bowls used? Has anyone done this and if so, what
        results were they?

        Gord Hutchings


        > I'd like to prepare a bunch of blue, yellow and white bee bowls, and I'm
        > wondering how much consideration I need to give to paint choice. Will any
        > fluorescent yellow paint do the trick (assuming the paint works on
        > plastic), or is it worth my time to invest in tried and true pigments?
        > I've perused some of the old discussions on this, and some of the paints
        > discussed might not be available in Canada.
        >
        > If this topic has already been covered ad nauseam I apologize, but I would
        > appreciate it if you could steer me to those old posts!
        >
        > Cheers,
        > John
        >
        > John Klymko
        > Zoologist
        > Atlantic Canada Conservation Data
        > Centre
        > PO Box 6416, Sackville, NB E4L 1G6
        > (506)364-2660(tel);
        > (506)364-2656(fax)
        > http://www.accdc.com 


        }\(-.-)/{
        https://sites.google.com/site/hutchingsbeeservice/announcement
      • Droege, Sam
        Pink and purplish do work, but get about the same species composition (limited trials in the east) as the other colors....so to keep complications to a minimum
        Message 3 of 8 , May 7, 2014
          Pink and purplish do work, but get about the same species composition (limited trials in the east) as the other colors....so to keep complications to a minimum we have stuck with the 3 main colors.

          sam

          FREQUENTLY the woods are pink,
          Frequently are brown;
          Frequently the hills undress
          Behind my native town.

          Oft a head is crested
          I was wont to see,
          And as oft a cranny
          Where it used to be.

          And the earth, they tell me,
          On its axis turned,—
          Wonderful rotation
          By but twelve performed!

          - Emily Dickinson


          On Wed, May 7, 2014 at 11:19 AM, Odo Natasaki <odonatas@...> wrote:
           

          This reminds me of a question I have had recently. Why aren't pink or
          "purplish" coloured bowls used? Has anyone done this and if so, what
          results were they?

          Gord Hutchings

          > I'd like to prepare a bunch of blue, yellow and white bee bowls, and I'm
          > wondering how much consideration I need to give to paint choice. Will any
          > fluorescent yellow paint do the trick (assuming the paint works on
          > plastic), or is it worth my time to invest in tried and true pigments?
          > I've perused some of the old discussions on this, and some of the paints
          > discussed might not be available in Canada.
          >
          > If this topic has already been covered ad nauseam I apologize, but I would
          > appreciate it if you could steer me to those old posts!
          >
          > Cheers,
          > John
          >
          > John Klymko
          > Zoologist
          > Atlantic Canada Conservation Data
          > Centre
          > PO Box 6416, Sackville, NB E4L 1G6
          > (506)364-2660(tel);
          > (506)364-2656(fax)
          > http://www.accdc.com 

          }\(-.-)/{
          https://sites.google.com/site/hutchingsbeeservice/announcement




          --
          Bees are Not Optional
          Apes sunt et non liberum
        • Andrew Lybbert
          This paper includes several colors outside of the standard blue, yellow and white. Sampling Bee Communities (Hymenoptera: Apiformes) in a Desert Landscape: Are
          Message 4 of 8 , May 7, 2014
            This paper includes several colors outside of the standard blue, yellow and white.

            Sampling Bee Communities (Hymenoptera: Apiformes) in a Desert Landscape: Are Pan Traps Sufficient?
            Author(s): Joseph S. Wilson , Terry Griswold , Olivia J. Messinger
            Source: Journal of the Kansas Entomological Society, 81(3):288-300. 2008.
            Published By: Kansas Entomological Society
            DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2317/JKES-802.06.1
            URL: http://www.bioone.org/doi/full/10.2317/JKES-802.06.1

            This document evaluates some different shades of the 'standard' colors (blue, yellow and white).

            Impact of Color and Size of Bowl Trap on Numbers of Bees Captured 
            Sam Droege 

            As always, the context of the location, time of sampling and purpose are critical. I'm sure if you keep digging you can find more info. These are just a few that I could remember off the top of my head. Good luck!


            Andrew Lybbert

            --

            Andrew Lybbert
            MS Student - Plant & Wildlife Sciences
            Brigham Young University
            (801) 602-4886
            ahlybbert@...



            To: klymko@...
            CC: beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com
            From: odonatas@...
            Date: Wed, 7 May 2014 08:19:06 -0700
            Subject: Re: [beemonitoring] Paint choice for painting bee bowls

             
            This reminds me of a question I have had recently. Why aren't pink or
            "purplish" coloured bowls used? Has anyone done this and if so, what
            results were they?

            Gord Hutchings

            > I'd like to prepare a bunch of blue, yellow and white bee bowls, and I'm
            > wondering how much consideration I need to give to paint choice. Will any
            > fluorescent yellow paint do the trick (assuming the paint works on
            > plastic), or is it worth my time to invest in tried and true pigments?
            > I've perused some of the old discussions on this, and some of the paints
            > discussed might not be available in Canada.
            >
            > If this topic has already been covered ad nauseam I apologize, but I would
            > appreciate it if you could steer me to those old posts!
            >
            > Cheers,
            > John
            >
            > John Klymko
            > Zoologist
            > Atlantic Canada Conservation Data
            > Centre
            > PO Box 6416, Sackville, NB E4L 1G6
            > (506)364-2660(tel);
            > (506)364-2656(fax)
            > http://www.accdc.com 

            }\(-.-)/{
            https://sites.google.com/site/hutchingsbeeservice/announcement


          • Andrew Lybbert
            John, I m sending this to you again with a Cc to the bee monitoring group just in case it can help anyone else! Andrew From: lklybbert@hotmail.com To:
            Message 5 of 8 , May 7, 2014
            John,

            I'm sending this to you again with a Cc to the bee monitoring group just in case it can help anyone else!

            Andrew


            From: lklybbert@...
            To: klymko@...
            Subject: RE: [beemonitoring] Paint choice for painting bee bowls
            Date: Wed, 7 May 2014 08:03:37 -0700

            Dear John,

            It would probably take me just as long as you to locate the old posts you are asking about, but Sam created a Handy Bee Manual that provides some great info on bowl traps and paint. I've attached a PDF, but the document is also always available on the Bee Inventory, Monitoring, and ID yahoo group page under the 'Files' section (see page 11 for info on bowl painting). 

            My paint decision was primarily based on logistical and financial convenience. In Utah where I currently live I found fantastic fluorescent paints at ACE Hardware, and they had plenty of it. All of my collections so far have been carried out in the Mojave Desert, so I use larger Solo cups than what Sam recommends because I need to make sure that my liquids won't entirely evaporate out of a trap on a hot day. I did primer my clear cups before applying the fluorescent colors but they have lasted well beyond my expectations. Weeks in hot desert conditions and they still look great. 

            Hope this helps,

            Andrew

            --

            Andrew Lybbert
            MS Student - Plant & Wildlife Sciences
            Brigham Young University
            ahlybbert@...
            (801) 602-4886
             


            To: beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com
            From: klymko@...
            Date: Wed, 7 May 2014 07:06:31 -0700
            Subject: [beemonitoring] Paint choice for painting bee bowls

             

            I'd like to prepare a bunch of blue, yellow and white bee bowls, and I'm wondering how much consideration I need to give to paint choice. Will any fluorescent yellow paint do the trick (assuming the paint works on plastic), or is it worth my time to invest in tried and true pigments? I've perused some of the old discussions on this, and some of the paints discussed might not be available in Canada.

            If this topic has already been covered ad nauseam I apologize, but I would appreciate it if you could steer me to those old posts!

            Cheers,
            John

            Zoologist
            Atlantic Canada Conservation Data Centre
            PO Box 6416, Sackville, NB E4L 1G6
            (506)364-2660(tel); (506)364-2656(fax)
            http://www.accdc.com 

          • Nicholas Stewart
            Couple things to consider... (1) MUST be UV/Fluorescent paint (2) Spray paints are by far the easiest to find & use (3) If you intend to be using larger,
            Message 6 of 8 , May 7, 2014

              Couple things to consider...

              (1) MUST be UV/Fluorescent paint

              (2) Spray paints are by far the easiest to find & use

              (3) If you intend to be using larger, longer-lasting bowls for multiple year assessments - while ensuring you maintain the all-important device/protocol  standardization... I find its better to paint those hundreds of devices ONCE. This means, PLASTIC PRIMER IS A MUST BEFORE PAINTING on the UV-YELLOW OR UV-BLUE (i learned this the hard way, painting an entirely new set of ~500 pans each winter for the the first 2 years of my study now in its 6th year). What's nice, though, is a third of your pans (the whites), are done with only the Primer application...as it's white & makes absolutely no difference to thw bees vs. white spray paint once dried

              (4) Yellow UV Spray paint is easy to locate at any Big Box hardware store, BUT...

              (5) Good luck finding the Blue UV paint unless you have a half-decent ACE Hardware nearby. They're the ONLY ones who readily carry Blue UV Paint, in their own ACE Store Brand. If you do have an ACE, get both the UV-Yellows & UV-Blue there - I've been able to  quantify/show** that the ACE UV-Yellow is the best out of all the UV-Yellows (I used all (6) commonly available brands) for both diversity & bee totals.**

              If you gave any further Q's, feel free to contact me.





              **One component of a much larger Methods paper I've been working on over the last 6 years. Includes my findings & recomnendations for everything from Sampling Protocols to Plot Collection Techniques to Trap Designs.

              Some selected points addressed in it, which I think are gonna be most suprising &/or valuable to kindred Apoid-i-philes are:

              (1) Benefits & (more importantly) limitations of - Pans..vanes...ground malaises...canopy malaises...random sweeps...targeted sweeps/hand catching...emergence devices...trap nests...etc - relating to such things as
              -Taxa biases (those groups guaranteed to almost entirely ignore & those that confusingly/confoundingly nail certain traps),
              - VERY Common Mistakes (that even the best-of-the-best make), &,
              - VERY Problematic Sampling Errors/Inconsistencies...

              (2) Findings from transects of Pan-trap Derivations, like: elevated vs. Level pans, Floral pans, Pans placed in Trees/Crops/Target Flora, Canopy Pans, Night pans...

              (3) Evaluations of Results from Sampling Discrepancies when different materials that are commonly interchangeable in standard device construction are used (Pan Paints, Pan Shapes, Sizes, Vane designs, Malaise netting color, etc)
              ...& on & on & on...

              This paper ALWAYS gets put on the backburner, for more succinct topics & those w/ quicker results.

              **BUT, if anyone has come across issues, biases, useless practices, efficient new techniques, etc... PLEASE hit me up & we could compare notes. Always looking to make what we all do more reliable, realistic, and standardized**

              On May 7, 2014 12:07 PM, "Andrew Lybbert" <lklybbert@...> wrote:
               

              This paper includes several colors outside of the standard blue, yellow and white.

              Sampling Bee Communities (Hymenoptera: Apiformes) in a Desert Landscape: Are Pan Traps Sufficient?
              Author(s): Joseph S. Wilson , Terry Griswold , Olivia J. Messinger
              Source: Journal of the Kansas Entomological Society, 81(3):288-300. 2008.
              Published By: Kansas Entomological Society

              This document evaluates some different shades of the 'standard' colors (blue, yellow and white).

              Impact of Color and Size of Bowl Trap on Numbers of Bees Captured 
              Sam Droege 

              As always, the context of the location, time of sampling and purpose are critical. I'm sure if you keep digging you can find more info. These are just a few that I could remember off the top of my head. Good luck!


              Andrew Lybbert

              --

              Andrew Lybbert
              MS Student - Plant & Wildlife Sciences
              Brigham Young University



              To: klymko@...
              CC: beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com
              From: odonatas@...
              Date: Wed, 7 May 2014 08:19:06 -0700
              Subject: Re: [beemonitoring] Paint choice for painting bee bowls

               
              This reminds me of a question I have had recently. Why aren't pink or
              "purplish" coloured bowls used? Has anyone done this and if so, what
              results were they?

              Gord Hutchings

              > I'd like to prepare a bunch of blue, yellow and white bee bowls, and I'm
              > wondering how much consideration I need to give to paint choice. Will any
              > fluorescent yellow paint do the trick (assuming the paint works on
              > plastic), or is it worth my time to invest in tried and true pigments?
              > I've perused some of the old discussions on this, and some of the paints
              > discussed might not be available in Canada.
              >
              > If this topic has already been covered ad nauseam I apologize, but I would
              > appreciate it if you could steer me to those old posts!
              >
              > Cheers,
              > John
              >
              > John Klymko
              > Zoologist
              > Atlantic Canada Conservation Data
              > Centre
              > PO Box 6416, Sackville, NB E4L 1G6
              > (506)364-2660(tel);
              > (506)364-2656(fax)
              > http://www.accdc.com 

              }\(-.-)/{
              https://sites.google.com/site/hutchingsbeeservice/announcement


            • John Klymko
              Thanks for the excellent responses everyone! On Wednesday, May 7, 2014 2:43:34 PM, Nicholas Stewart wrote:   Couple things to
              Message 7 of 8 , May 7, 2014
                Thanks for the excellent responses everyone!
                On Wednesday, May 7, 2014 2:43:34 PM, Nicholas Stewart <nick.s2art@...> wrote:
                 
                Couple things to consider...
                (1) MUST be UV/Fluorescent paint
                (2) Spray paints are by far the easiest to find & use
                (3) If you intend to be using larger, longer-lasting bowls for multiple year assessments - while ensuring you maintain the all-important device/protocol  standardization... I find its better to paint those hundreds of devices ONCE. This means, PLASTIC PRIMER IS A MUST BEFORE PAINTING on the UV-YELLOW OR UV-BLUE (i learned this the hard way, painting an entirely new set of ~500 pans each winter for the the first 2 years of my study now in its 6th year). What's nice, though, is a third of your pans (the whites), are done with only the Primer application...as it's white & makes absolutely no difference to thw bees vs. white spray paint once dried
                (4) Yellow UV Spray paint is easy to locate at any Big Box hardware store, BUT...
                (5) Good luck finding the Blue UV paint unless you have a half-decent ACE Hardware nearby. They're the ONLY ones who readily carry Blue UV Paint, in their own ACE Store Brand. If you do have an ACE, get both the UV-Yellows & UV-Blue there - I've been able to  quantify/show** that the ACE UV-Yellow is the best out of all the UV-Yellows (I used all (6) commonly available brands) for both diversity & bee totals.**
                If you gave any further Q's, feel free to contact me.





                **One component of a much larger Methods paper I've been working on over the last 6 years. Includes my findings & recomnendations for everything from Sampling Protocols to Plot Collection Techniques to Trap Designs.
                Some selected points addressed in it, which I think are gonna be most suprising &/or valuable to kindred Apoid-i-philes are:
                (1) Benefits & (more importantly) limitations of - Pans..vanes...ground malaises...canopy malaises...random sweeps...targeted sweeps/hand catching...emergence devices...trap nests...etc - relating to such things as
                -Taxa biases (those groups guaranteed to almost entirely ignore & those that confusingly/confoundingly nail certain traps),
                - VERY Common Mistakes (that even the best-of-the-best make), &,
                - VERY Problematic Sampling Errors/Inconsistencies...
                (2) Findings from transects of Pan-trap Derivations, like: elevated vs. Level pans, Floral pans, Pans placed in Trees/Crops/Target Flora, Canopy Pans, Night pans...
                (3) Evaluations of Results from Sampling Discrepancies when different materials that are commonly interchangeable in standard device construction are used (Pan Paints, Pan Shapes, Sizes, Vane designs, Malaise netting color, etc)
                ...& on & on & on...
                This paper ALWAYS gets put on the backburner, for more succinct topics & those w/ quicker results.
                **BUT, if anyone has come across issues, biases, useless practices, efficient new techniques, etc... PLEASE hit me up & we could compare notes. Always looking to make what we all do more reliable, realistic, and standardized**
                On May 7, 2014 12:07 PM, "Andrew Lybbert" <lklybbert@...> wrote:
                 
                This paper includes several colors outside of the standard blue, yellow and white.

                Sampling Bee Communities (Hymenoptera: Apiformes) in a Desert Landscape: Are Pan Traps Sufficient?
                Author(s): Joseph S. Wilson , Terry Griswold , Olivia J. Messinger
                Source: Journal of the Kansas Entomological Society, 81(3):288-300. 2008.
                Published By: Kansas Entomological Society

                This document evaluates some different shades of the 'standard' colors (blue, yellow and white).

                Impact of Color and Size of Bowl Trap on Numbers of Bees Captured 
                Sam Droege 

                As always, the context of the location, time of sampling and purpose are critical. I'm sure if you keep digging you can find more info. These are just a few that I could remember off the top of my head. Good luck!


                Andrew Lybbert

                --

                Andrew Lybbert
                MS Student - Plant & Wildlife Sciences
                Brigham Young University



                To: klymko@...
                CC: beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com
                From: odonatas@...
                Date: Wed, 7 May 2014 08:19:06 -0700
                Subject: Re: [beemonitoring] Paint choice for painting bee bowls

                 
                This reminds me of a question I have had recently. Why aren't pink or
                "purplish" coloured bowls used? Has anyone done this and if so, what
                results were they?

                Gord Hutchings

                > I'd like to prepare a bunch of blue, yellow and white bee bowls, and I'm
                > wondering how much consideration I need to give to paint choice. Will any
                > fluorescent yellow paint do the trick (assuming the paint works on
                > plastic), or is it worth my time to invest in tried and true pigments?
                > I've perused some of the old discussions on this, and some of the paints
                > discussed might not be available in Canada.
                >
                > If this topic has already been covered ad nauseam I apologize, but I would
                > appreciate it if you could steer me to those old posts!
                >
                > Cheers,
                > John
                >
                > John Klymko
                > Zoologist
                > Atlantic Canada Conservation Data
                > Centre
                > PO Box 6416, Sackville, NB E4L 1G6
                > (506)364-2660(tel);
                > (506)364-2656(fax)
                > http://www.accdc.com 

                }\(-.-)/{
                https://sites.google.com/site/hutchingsbeeservice/announcement




              • Colin Phifer
                I don t know if it s been mentioned yet but you can purchase pre-painted bowls as well. I purchased some last summer and they worked great. The work For more
                Message 8 of 8 , May 7, 2014
                  I don't know if it's been mentioned yet but you can purchase pre-painted bowls as well. I purchased some last summer and they worked great. The work 

                  For more information check out this link: http://www.nhssi.org/entomologyservices.html

                  They use the same solo 3.5 ounce cups and fluorescent paints recommended in the Bee Manual. I think I paid 5 cents for the white and 19 centers for painted ones? If time is of the essence this might be a good option too.

                  Happy bees,
                  Colin

                  On May 7, 2014, at 3:05 PM, John Klymko <klymko@...> wrote:


                  Thanks for the excellent responses everyone!
                  On Wednesday, May 7, 2014 2:43:34 PM, Nicholas Stewart <nick.s2art@...> wrote:
                   
                  Couple things to consider...
                  (1) MUST be UV/Fluorescent paint
                  (2) Spray paints are by far the easiest to find & use
                  (3) If you intend to be using larger, longer-lasting bowls for multiple year assessments - while ensuring you maintain the all-important device/protocol  standardization... I find its better to paint those hundreds of devices ONCE. This means, PLASTIC PRIMER IS A MUST BEFORE PAINTING on the UV-YELLOW OR UV-BLUE (i learned this the hard way, painting an entirely new set of ~500 pans each winter for the the first 2 years of my study now in its 6th year). What's nice, though, is a third of your pans (the whites), are done with only the Primer application...as it's white & makes absolutely no difference to thw bees vs. white spray paint once dried
                  (4) Yellow UV Spray paint is easy to locate at any Big Box hardware store, BUT...
                  (5) Good luck finding the Blue UV paint unless you have a half-decent ACE Hardware nearby. They're the ONLY ones who readily carry Blue UV Paint, in their own ACE Store Brand. If you do have an ACE, get both the UV-Yellows & UV-Blue there - I've been able to  quantify/show** that the ACE UV-Yellow is the best out of all the UV-Yellows (I used all (6) commonly available brands) for both diversity & bee totals.**
                  If you gave any further Q's, feel free to contact me.





                  **One component of a much larger Methods paper I've been working on over the last 6 years. Includes my findings & recomnendations for everything from Sampling Protocols to Plot Collection Techniques to Trap Designs.
                  Some selected points addressed in it, which I think are gonna be most suprising &/or valuable to kindred Apoid-i-philes are:
                  (1) Benefits & (more importantly) limitations of - Pans..vanes...ground malaises...canopy malaises...random sweeps...targeted sweeps/hand catching...emergence devices...trap nests...etc - relating to such things as 
                  -Taxa biases (those groups guaranteed to almost entirely ignore & those that confusingly/confoundingly nail certain traps), 
                  - VERY Common Mistakes (that even the best-of-the-best make), &,
                  - VERY Problematic Sampling Errors/Inconsistencies...
                  (2) Findings from transects of Pan-trap Derivations, like: elevated vs. Level pans, Floral pans, Pans placed in Trees/Crops/Target Flora, Canopy Pans, Night pans...
                  (3) Evaluations of Results from Sampling Discrepancies when different materials that are commonly interchangeable in standard device construction are used (Pan Paints, Pan Shapes, Sizes, Vane designs, Malaise netting color, etc)
                  ...& on & on & on...
                  This paper ALWAYS gets put on the backburner, for more succinct topics & those w/ quicker results.
                  **BUT, if anyone has come across issues, biases, useless practices, efficient new techniques, etc... PLEASE hit me up & we could compare notes. Always looking to make what we all do more reliable, realistic, and standardized**
                  On May 7, 2014 12:07 PM, "Andrew Lybbert" <lklybbert@...> wrote:
                   
                  This paper includes several colors outside of the standard blue, yellow and white.

                  Sampling Bee Communities (Hymenoptera: Apiformes) in a Desert Landscape: Are Pan Traps Sufficient?
                  Author(s): Joseph S. Wilson , Terry Griswold , Olivia J. Messinger
                  Source: Journal of the Kansas Entomological Society, 81(3):288-300. 2008.
                  Published By: Kansas Entomological Society

                  This document evaluates some different shades of the 'standard' colors (blue, yellow and white).

                  Impact of Color and Size of Bowl Trap on Numbers of Bees Captured 
                  Sam Droege 

                  As always, the context of the location, time of sampling and purpose are critical. I'm sure if you keep digging you can find more info. These are just a few that I could remember off the top of my head. Good luck!


                  Andrew Lybbert

                  --

                  Andrew Lybbert
                  MS Student - Plant & Wildlife Sciences
                  Brigham Young University



                  To: klymko@...
                  CC: beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com
                  From: odonatas@...
                  Date: Wed, 7 May 2014 08:19:06 -0700
                  Subject: Re: [beemonitoring] Paint choice for painting bee bowls

                   
                  This reminds me of a question I have had recently. Why aren't pink or
                  "purplish" coloured bowls used? Has anyone done this and if so, what
                  results were they?

                  Gord Hutchings

                  > I'd like to prepare a bunch of blue, yellow and white bee bowls, and I'm
                  > wondering how much consideration I need to give to paint choice. Will any
                  > fluorescent yellow paint do the trick (assuming the paint works on
                  > plastic), or is it worth my time to invest in tried and true pigments?
                  > I've perused some of the old discussions on this, and some of the paints
                  > discussed might not be available in Canada.
                  >
                  > If this topic has already been covered ad nauseam I apologize, but I would
                  > appreciate it if you could steer me to those old posts!
                  >
                  > Cheers,
                  > John
                  >
                  > John Klymko
                  > Zoologist
                  > Atlantic Canada Conservation Data
                  > Centre
                  > PO Box 6416, Sackville, NB E4L 1G6
                  > (506)364-2660(tel);
                  > (506)364-2656(fax)
                  > http://www.accdc.com 

                  }\(-.-)/{
                  https://sites.google.com/site/hutchingsbeeservice/announcement






                Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.