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Gynandromorphic Bombus bimaculatus

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  • MaLisa Spring
    Hi everyone! I was wondering if anyone had seen any gynandromorphic Bombus bimaculatus in their surveys. I collected one as part of my research project and Sam
    Message 1 of 6 , May 6, 2014
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      Hi everyone!

      I was wondering if anyone had seen any gynandromorphic Bombus bimaculatus in their surveys. I collected one as part of my research project and Sam has confirmed it to species.

      I was able to find a review on all gynandromorphs in the literature (Link here: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/00379271.2009.10697621#.U2mHxlfZf5c)  but I haven't heard of that many in Bombus.

      So what do you all think? Have you seen any gynandromorphs and if so about how often? I collected a total of about 2,700 bees, but I think I was pretty lucky.

      Thanks,

      MaLisa Spring
      Marietta College 2014
    • Hillary Sardiñas
      I collected a few Melissodes agilis gynandromorphs over the past few years in California sunflower fields. The front-back ones were really quite tricky to
      Message 2 of 6 , May 6, 2014
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        I collected a few Melissodes agilis gynandromorphs over the past few years in California sunflower fields. The front-back ones were really quite tricky to separate out (needed Robin Thorp's help), as compared to those with lateral differentiation. I haven't found any records of this species being found before, at least not in my literature searches. I'd be interested to know if anyone else has collected them.
        Thanks for sending the review MeLisa, it is a very fascinating subject.
        Best,
        Hillary


        On Tue, May 6, 2014 at 6:12 PM, MaLisa Spring <malisa.spring@...> wrote:
         

        Hi everyone!

        I was wondering if anyone had seen any gynandromorphic Bombus bimaculatus in their surveys. I collected one as part of my research project and Sam has confirmed it to species.

        I was able to find a review on all gynandromorphs in the literature (Link here: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/00379271.2009.10697621#.U2mHxlfZf5c)  but I haven't heard of that many in Bombus.

        So what do you all think? Have you seen any gynandromorphs and if so about how often? I collected a total of about 2,700 bees, but I think I was pretty lucky.

        Thanks,

        MaLisa Spring
        Marietta College 2014




        --
        Hillary Sardiñas
        PhD Candidate
        Environmental Science, Policy & Management
        University of California, Berkeley

        http://nature.berkeley.edu/kremenlab/hillary.html

        https://nativebeeresearch.wordpress.com
      • Elaine Evans
        My former lab mate, Ian Burns, collected a gynandromorphic *Bombus*. I can t remember the species. It was in the U.K. and it was long ago (probably over 40
        Message 3 of 6 , May 7, 2014
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          My former lab mate, Ian Burns, collected a gynandromorphic Bombus. I can't remember the species. It was in the U.K. and it was long ago (probably over 40 years ago). Agree that it isn't a common thing.

          -Elaine

          Elaine Evans
          PhD Candidate, Dept of Entomology
          University of Minnesota
        • Jared Amos
          Hi, I had a bilateral gynandromorph of Bombus flavifrons in my collection of bees caught in northern Alberta. It seems there was a gynandromorph of Bombus
          Message 4 of 6 , May 7, 2014
          Hi,

          I had a bilateral gynandromorph of Bombus flavifrons in my collection of bees caught in northern Alberta.  It seems there was a gynandromorph of Bombus flavifrons recorded in 1962 (Michez et al. 2009).

          Jared Amos
          M.Sc. Student
          University of Alberta


        • Jack Neff
          While gynandromorphs have been reported in many genera, they seem to be quite rare among long tongued bees (apids and megachilids).  However, mild
          Message 5 of 6 , May 7, 2014
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            While gynandromorphs have been reported in many genera, they seem to be quite rare among long tongued bees (apids and megachilids).  However, mild intersexes  (feminized males, masculinized females) are fairly common among stylopized short tongued bees (bees parasitized by a strepsipsteran).

            best

            Jack
             
            John L. Neff
            Central Texas Melittological Institute
            7307 Running Rope
            Austin,TX 78731 USA
            512-345-7219
            On Wednesday, May 7, 2014 9:42 AM, Jared Amos <jamos@...> wrote:
            [Attachment(s) from Jared Amos included below]
            Hi,

            I had a bilateral gynandromorph of Bombus flavifrons in my collection of bees caught in northern Alberta.  It seems there was a gynandromorph of Bombus flavifrons recorded in 1962 (Michez et al. 2009).

            Jared Amos
            M.Sc. Student
            University of Alberta




          • MaLisa Spring
            For those wondering, photographic evidence of the gynandromorph is now up on the USGS Flickr site if you haven t seen it already.
            Message 6 of 6 , May 9, 2014
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              For those wondering, photographic evidence of the gynandromorph is now up on the USGS Flickr site if you haven't seen it already. https://www.flickr.com/photos/usgsbiml/14145976752/

              Also note that the sexuality of the head is inverted compared to the body, so the right half of the bee has a male abdomen and thorax and female head and antennae, which can bee seen in the photograph.

              Thanks to Sam for such a quick turnaround!

              MaLisa Spring
              Marietta College 2014


              On Wed, May 7, 2014 at 11:08 AM, Jack Neff <jlnatctmi@...> wrote:
               

              While gynandromorphs have been reported in many genera, they seem to be quite rare among long tongued bees (apids and megachilids).  However, mild intersexes  (feminized males, masculinized females) are fairly common among stylopized short tongued bees (bees parasitized by a strepsipsteran).

              best

              Jack
               
              John L. Neff
              Central Texas Melittological Institute
              7307 Running Rope
              Austin,TX 78731 USA
              512-345-7219
              On Wednesday, May 7, 2014 9:42 AM, Jared Amos <jamos@...> wrote:
               
              [Attachment(s) from Jared Amos included below]
              Hi,

              I had a bilateral gynandromorph of Bombus flavifrons in my collection of bees caught in northern Alberta.  It seems there was a gynandromorph of Bombus flavifrons recorded in 1962 (Michez et al. 2009).

              Jared Amos
              M.Sc. Student
              University of Alberta





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