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Fwd: Native honeybee in Yunnan

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  • Peter Bernhardt
    Dr Ren Zong-Xin is my research colleague at the Botanical Institute in Kunming. He has a particular interest in the pollination biology of traditional
    Message 1 of 2 , Mar 12, 2014
    Dr Ren Zong-Xin is my research colleague at the Botanical Institute in Kunming.  He has a particular interest in the pollination biology of traditional medicinal species as a large proportion of the species in the Chinese pharmacopeia are now in cultivation.  Here are his recent thoughts and photos of beekeeping, Apis cerana, in his hometown.  Please note that A. cerana is NOT a domesticated species in Yunnan, or any other part of China.  Local people go into the forest and remove colonies of this species just as the Mayans in southern Mexico and Guatemala continue to remove colonies of Melipona.  In Yunnan forests A. cerana appears to prefer to nest in oaks.   Please look at the bee on the yellow brassica flowers.  Considering the long antenna isn't that a drone or are we looking as some other, native, Eucera-like species? 

    It is my hope that Professor Ren will join NAPPC. He completed field and lab work on several Native American wildflowers while "post-docking"  in my lab in 2013.   

    Peter 

    ---------- Forwarded message ----------
    From: 任宗昕 <renzongxin@...>
    Date: Sun, Mar 9, 2014 at 9:20 PM
    Subject: Native honeybee in Yunnan
    To: Peter Bernhardt <bernhap2@...>
    Cc: "Robert A. Raguso" <rar229@...>, Justin Zweck <jzweck@...>, Mike Arduser <Michael.Arduser@...>, Retha Meier <rmeier3@...>, Peter Kevan <pkevan@...>



    Dear Prof. Bernhardt,

    I took some photos of domesticated hives of native Chinese honeybee in my hometown, a small and peaceful village in Lijiang, northwestern Yunnan. In this area, I didn't find any common western honeybee. 

    The local native honeybee keepers locate their hives around the houses, usually in yard or in vegetable garden. In the first picture you can see four hives in a vegetable garden (some garlic and brassica), the hives are located in the hollow oak trunks and well rain/water protected. Plastic bag cover the hives, it also keep the hives warm at winter time. The exist of hive is covered by cow poop mixed with mud, I don't know why they did this.

    Best,

    Zong-Xin




    --
    *********************************
    Zong-Xin Ren, PhD
    Post Doc. Department of Biology, Saint Louis University, USA
    Germplasm Bank of Wild Species, Kunming Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences,
    132, Lanhei Road, Kunming, Yunnan 650201, P. R. China
    Tel: +86
    871-5223534
    Fax: +86
    871-5217791
    E-mail: renzongxin@...
    http://renzongxinorchid.weebly.com/




  • Doug Yanega
    ... That is indeed a male Eucera. -- Doug Yanega Dept. of Entomology Entomology Research Museum Univ. of California, Riverside, CA 92521-0314
    Message 2 of 2 , Mar 12, 2014
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      On 3/12/14 8:07 AM, Peter Bernhardt wrote:
       
      That is indeed a male Eucera. 
      
      -- 
      Doug Yanega      Dept. of Entomology       Entomology Research Museum
      Univ. of California, Riverside, CA 92521-0314     skype: dyanega
      phone: (951) 827-4315 (disclaimer: opinions are mine, not UCR's)
                   http://cache.ucr.edu/~heraty/yanega.html
        "There are some enterprises in which a careful disorderliness
              is the true method" - Herman Melville, Moby Dick, Chap. 82
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