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Impact of metal contamination on bees

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  • Droege, Sam
    All Below is the first article I am aware of that looks at metal contamination in bees in this case Selenium. https://ucrtoday.ucr.edu/18085 It is worth noting
    Message 1 of 2 , Dec 13, 2013
      All

      Below is the first article I am aware of that looks at metal contamination in bees in this case Selenium.


      It is worth noting that in addition to the usual contaminated mining and smelter sites there are other possible avenues for bees to pick up such contamination in urban and agriculture settings.  

      I know that in organic farming circles the use of metal based treatments of copper and sulphur are on the up and it might become an issue, particularly if the residues accumulate or are long-lived.

      sam

      Lamium

      This is how you live when you have a cold heart.
      As I do: in shadows, trailing over cool rock,
      under the great maple trees.

      The sun hardly touches me.
      Sometimes I see it in early spring, rising very far away.
      Then leaves grow over it, completely hiding it. I feel it
      glinting through the leaves, erratic,
      like someone hitting the side of a glass with a metal spoon.

      Living things don't all require
      light in the same degree. Some of us
      make our own light: a silver leaf
      like a path no one can use, a shallow
      lake of silver in the darkness under the great maples.

      But you know this already.
      You and the others who think
      you live for truth and, by extension, love
      all that is cold.

      - Louise Gluck





      --
      Bees are Not Optional
      Ong là không bắt buộc
    • Anita M. Collins
      Sam, Thank you for the article on honey bees and selenium. As you know my survey site at Lehigh Gap Nature Center is on a Superfund site that is the result of
      Message 2 of 2 , Dec 13, 2013
        Sam,
         
        Thank you for the article on honey bees and selenium.
        As you know my survey site at Lehigh Gap Nature Center is on a Superfund site that is the result of zinc smelting.  Has high levels of zinc, cadmium and lead.  Also acid rain from the sulfuric acid thatwas a by-product of the old plant. 
        Many native bees seem to be florishing in areas of high contamination on the Center.  The original recovery was due to a mix of native warm season grasses that don't pick up the metals.  But many flowering species were added later that are supporting the bees.  We have some data on plant uptake and hope to get something done on those metals in nectar, pollen and bees. The grey birch do take up the zinc and do well.  In fact for us they are invasive and we done a test burn with air quality sampling to see if that is a feasable way to keep the area meadow.
         
        Anita Collins
         
         
         
        If we knew what we were doing, it wouldn't be called research.
        Albert Einstein
         
        On 12/13/13, Droege, Sam<sdroege@...> wrote:
         
         

        All

        Below is the first article I am aware of that looks at metal contamination in bees in this case Selenium.


        It is worth noting that in addition to the usual contaminated mining and smelter sites there are other possible avenues for bees to pick up such contamination in urban and agriculture settings.  

        I know that in organic farming circles the use of metal based treatments of copper and sulphur are on the up and it might become an issue, particularly if the residues accumulate or are long-lived.

        sam

        Lamium

        This is how you live when you have a cold heart.
        As I do: in shadows, trailing over cool rock,
        under the great maple trees.

        The sun hardly touches me.
        Sometimes I see it in early spring, rising very far away.
        Then leaves grow over it, completely hiding it. I feel it
        glinting through the leaves, erratic,
        like someone hitting the side of a glass with a metal spoon.

        Living things don't all require
        light in the same degree. Some of us
        make our own light: a silver leaf
        like a path no one can use, a shallow
        lake of silver in the darkness under the great maples.

        But you know this already.
        You and the others who think
        you live for truth and, by extension, love
        all that is cold.

        - Louise Gluck





        --
        Bees are Not Optional
        Ong là không bắt buộc
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