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Goldenrod and other Asteraceae as Fall's primary nectar source

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  • Droege, Sam
    All: I received the following questions from Dave Wagner who is writing up a paper on bees in New England Rights of Way. I am writing up a vegetation study
    Message 1 of 5 , Dec 9, 2013
      All:

      I received the following questions from Dave Wagner who is writing up a paper on bees in New England Rights of Way.  


      I am writing up a vegetation study under a transmission line ROW and we have good  data on Solidago and other nectar sources.  I wanted to add this sentence to the manuscript.

        

      “A second functional group, the composites (Asteraceae) provide much of the late-season pollen and nectar for wild bees and legions of other flower visitors: flower flies, wasps, pollen-feeding beetles, butterflies, moths, and others (Ginsberg 1983, Barth 1991, Discover Life 2013)…”

       

      Can you recommend a reference or a person that I might contact about goldenrod serving as a primary pollen/nectar source for late-season bees?


      So if anyone has any references regarding fall nectar sources and, in particular, the roll of Solidago that would be great. 

      I would like to throw out this general observation from collecting that while Goldenrod is certainly worth hunting bees on and, at times, has interesting things like Perdita that its general attractiveness is less compared to Frost Asters.

      Thanks 
      sam

      Flooded Meadow


                 Low dandelion leaves are zoned commercial, 

      with their promise of puffballs to come.


                 Bits of dew spackle the high grass 

      asymmetrically; they are sleek apartment windows, 

                 skyscrapers are weeds.


                 Tall sprigs of goldenrod patrol 

      the blown-down city line....


                 There is another world 

      in this world, but it was not made for you.


                 Round oniongrass stalks are old monuments 

      to persistence in hard times. 

                 You could live up inside one 

      and learn to like it, cramped quarters, 

            & nbsp;    cooking smells and all.


                 Two bees report on traffic, warning listeners 

      to the anemophily channel 

                 as the natural disaster 

      of humanity comes closer 

                 every morning. Work while you can, they say.



                 - STEPHEN BURT

      Bees are Not Optional
      Ong là không bắt buộc
    • Cane, Jim
      Folks -it is a general observation and common knowledge extending back through a century s worth of undergraduate insect collections for general entomology,
      Message 2 of 5 , Dec 9, 2013

        Folks –it is a general observation and common knowledge extending back through a century’s worth of undergraduate insect collections for general entomology, including my own, at least for the eastern 1/3-1/2 of the U.S.  Proving resource value is a far, far greater order.  First, you would have to at least note and count visitors with tongues extended at this versus other co-flowering plants and estimate bloom per unit area.  I would not be keen to sample and measure nectar per floret!  For just honeybees, use is sometimes sampled using pollen spun out of honey in a centrifuge, but then you would have to prepare and distinguish it from like-looking other Asteraceae that bloom in fall.  For fall Asteraceae in general, I’ll bet this has already been done.  If for pollen itself, one could try the same approach to pollen ID using samples from hives outfitted with pollen traps.  This may already have been done too. Perhaps the better bet is to write that goldenrods attract a diverse and abundant guild of bees, which you could grab from collection data.

         

        Yours,

         

        Jim

         

        ===============================

        James H. Cane

        USDA-ARS Pollinating Insect Research Unit

        Utah State University, Logan, UT 84322 USA

        tel: 435-797-3879   FAX: 435-797-0461

        email: Jim.Cane@... 

        web page: www.ars.usda.gov/npa/beelab

        publications: http://digitalcommons.usu.edu/piru/

        Gardening for Bees: http://extension.usu.edu/files/publications/factsheet/plants-pollinators09.pdf

         





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      • Odo Natasaki
        Hi, I don t think of myself as reference person on this subject but a few years ago in Yukon Territory, the primary plant that was in flower was Solidago and
        Message 3 of 5 , Dec 9, 2013
          Hi,

          I don't think of myself as reference person on this subject but a few
          years ago in Yukon Territory, the primary plant that was in flower was
          Solidago and man oh man, were they smokin' covered in all bees native!
          That's why so many of my photos feature this plant on my website. The
          other candidate at the time was yarrow and a variety of the native "weedy"
          asteracea like Seneca, Taraxacum etc. That late in the season
          (mid-August) didn't have much around except for a few pockets here and
          there as I roamed around the territory.

          Just my input for what it's worth.

          Gord Hutchings



          > All:
          >
          > I received the following questions from Dave Wagner who is writing up a
          > paper on bees in New England Rights of Way.
          >
          >
          > I am writing up a vegetation study under a transmission line ROW and we
          > have good data on *Solidago* and other nectar sources. I wanted to add
          > this sentence to the manuscript.
          >
          >
          >
          > “A second functional group, the composites (Asteraceae) provide much of
          > the
          > late-season pollen and nectar for wild bees and legions of other flower
          > visitors: flower flies, wasps, pollen-feeding beetles, butterflies, moths,
          > and others (Ginsberg 1983, Barth 1991, Discover Life 2013)…”
          >
          >
          >
          > Can you recommend a reference or a person that I might contact about
          > goldenrod serving as a primary pollen/nectar source for late-season bees?
          >
          >
          > So if anyone has any references regarding fall nectar sources and, in
          > particular, the roll of Solidago that would be great.
          >
          > I would like to throw out this general observation from collecting that
          > while Goldenrod is certainly worth hunting bees on and, at times, has
          > interesting things like Perdita that its general attractiveness is less
          > compared to Frost Asters.
          >
          > Thanks
          > sam
          >
          > Flooded Meadow
          >
          >
          > Low dandelion leaves are zoned commercial,
          >
          > with their promise of puffballs to come.
          >
          >
          > Bits of dew spackle the high grass
          >
          > asymmetrically; they are sleek apartment windows,
          >
          > skyscrapers are weeds.
          >
          >
          > Tall sprigs of goldenrod patrol
          >
          > the blown-down city line....
          >
          >
          > There is another world
          >
          > in this world, but it was not made for you.
          >
          >
          > Round oniongrass stalks are old monuments
          >
          > to persistence in hard times.
          >
          > You could live up inside one
          >
          > and learn to like it, cramped quarters,
          >
          > & nbsp; cooking smells and all.
          >
          >
          > Two bees report on traffic, warning listeners
          >
          > to the anemophily channel
          >
          > as the natural disaster
          >
          > of humanity comes closer
          >
          > every morning. Work while you can, they say.
          >
          >
          >
          > - STEPHEN BURT
          >
          > *Bees are Not Optional*
          >
          > *Ong là không bắt buộc*
          >


          }\(-.-)/{
          https://sites.google.com/site/hutchingsbeeservice/announcement
        • pollinator2001
          I have no references, but would note as a longtime observer that Solidago is usually a very good nectar source for a wide variety of bee, wasp and other
          Message 4 of 5 , Dec 9, 2013

            I have no references, but would note as a longtime observer that Solidago is usually a very good nectar source for a wide variety of bee, wasp and other species, but is greatly variable, depending on the species of Solidago, the regional variations of soil, the amount of rainfall prior to bloom, and the amount of favorable weather (temperature range, insolation and humidity) during the bloom.  Examples: a dry summer produces very little goldenrod nectar; in areas such as the Finger Lakes, sweet (high lime) soils generally produce little goldenrod honey, while moving the bees a few miles to a more acid soil can greatly increase yields.


            This year in coastal SC, I noted the rarety of honey bees on solidago at my home, despite nearby bee hives, yet they were literally covered with B. impatiens, a variety of wasps, and occasional smaller bees. When the solidago passed peak, the pollinators switched to frostweed (a small white aster), and this time honey bees were well included. Other years I've seen honey bees massively go for goldenrod, being the main visitor.


            I'm convinced that some goldenrods in some areas produce so much nectar in some years that it is not all utilized. Beekeepers know these areas and seek them out for bee yard locations. I remember one particularly good year when I walked from one bee yard to another, about a mile apart. There were massive numbers of honey bee foragers within a hundred yards of each bee yard. As I walked, they thinned out rapidly, so that there were hardly any honey bees to be seen in the middle. That year the hives made 60-70 pounds of honey and some went over 100 pounds, on goldenrod alone.


            Dave Green
            Retired (honey) beekeeper and lifelong observer of all bees



            ---In beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com, <sdroege@...> wrote:

            All:

            I received the following questions from Dave Wagner who is writing up a paper on bees in New England Rights of Way.  


            I am writing up a vegetation study under a transmission line ROW and we have good  data on Solidago and other nectar sources.  I wanted to add this sentence to the manuscript.

              

            “A second functional group, the composites (Asteraceae) provide much of the late-season pollen and nectar for wild bees and legions of other flower visitors: flower flies, wasps, pollen-feeding beetles, butterflies, moths, and others (Ginsberg 1983, Barth 1991, Discover Life 2013)…”

             

            Can you recommend a reference or a person that I might contact about goldenrod serving as a primary pollen/nectar source for late-season bees?


            So if anyone has any references regarding fall nectar sources and, in particular, the roll of Solidago that would be great. 

            I would like to throw out this general observation from collecting that while Goldenrod is certainly worth hunting bees on and, at times, has interesting things like Perdita that its general attractiveness is less compared to Frost Asters.

            Thanks 
            sam

            Flooded Meadow


                       Low dandelion leaves are zoned commercial, 

            with their promise of puffballs to come.


                       Bits of dew spackle the high grass 

            asymmetrically; they are sleek apartment windows, 

                       skyscrapers are weeds.


                       Tall sprigs of goldenrod patrol 

            the blown-down city line....


                       There is another world 

            in this world, but it was not made for you.


                       Round oniongrass stalks are old monuments 

            to persistence in hard times. 

                       You could live up inside one 

            and learn to like it, cramped quarters, 

                  & nbsp;    cooking smells and all.


                       Two bees report on traffic, warning listeners 

            to the anemophily channel 

                       as the natural disaster 

            of humanity comes closer 

                       every morning. Work while you can, they say.



                       - STEPHEN BURT

            Bees are Not Optional
            Ong là không bắt buộc
          • Hendrix, Stephen D
            From my collections on prairies in the Midwest over the past 12 or so years we have the following number of bee specimens from different Solidago species:
            Message 5 of 5 , Dec 9, 2013

              From my collections on prairies in the Midwest over the past 12 or so years we have the following number of bee specimens from different Solidago species:

               

              Solidago canadensis

              73

              Solidago gigantea

              20

              Solidago missouriensis

              1

              Solidago nemoralis

              4

              Solidago riddellii

              8

              Solidago rigida

              156

               

               

              These numbers are out of a total of 6,293 specimens.  I would agree that many beetles, wasps, etc. use S. Canadensis, in addition to some bees.  S. rigida is common on many prairies and is quite attractive to bees.

               

              Cheers,

              Steve Hendrix

               

               

               

              From: beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com [mailto:beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Pollinator@...
              Sent: Monday, December 09, 2013 10:31 AM
              To: beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: [beemonitoring] RE: Goldenrod and other Asteraceae as Fall's primary nectar source

               

               

              I have no references, but would note as a longtime observer that Solidago is usually a very good nectar source for a wide variety of bee, wasp and other species, but is greatly variable, depending on the species of Solidago, the regional variations of soil, the amount of rainfall prior to bloom, and the amount of favorable weather (temperature range, insolation and humidity) during the bloom.  Examples: a dry summer produces very little goldenrod nectar; in areas such as the Finger Lakes, sweet (high lime) soils generally produce little goldenrod honey, while moving the bees a few miles to a more acid soil can greatly increase yields.

               

              This year in coastal SC, I noted the rarety of honey bees on solidago at my home, despite nearby bee hives, yet they were literally covered with B. impatiens, a variety of wasps, and occasional smaller bees. When the solidago passed peak, the pollinators switched to frostweed (a small white aster), and this time honey bees were well included. Other years I've seen honey bees massively go for goldenrod, being the main visitor.

               

              I'm convinced that some goldenrods in some areas produce so much nectar in some years that it is not all utilized. Beekeepers know these areas and seek them out for bee yard locations. I remember one particularly good year when I walked from one bee yard to another, about a mile apart. There were massive numbers of honey bee foragers within a hundred yards of each bee yard. As I walked, they thinned out rapidly, so that there were hardly any honey bees to be seen in the middle. That year the hives made 60-70 pounds of honey and some went over 100 pounds, on goldenrod alone.


              Dave Green

              Retired (honey) beekeeper and lifelong observer of all bees

               

               


              ---In beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com, <sdroege@...> wrote:

              All:

               

              I received the following questions from Dave Wagner who is writing up a paper on bees in New England Rights of Way.  

               

               

              I am writing up a vegetation study under a transmission line ROW and we have good  data on Solidago and other nectar sources.  I wanted to add this sentence to the manuscript.

                

              “A second functional group, the composites (Asteraceae) provide much of the late-season pollen and nectar for wild bees and legions of other flower visitors: flower flies, wasps, pollen-feeding beetles, butterflies, moths, and others (Ginsberg 1983, Barth 1991, Discover Life 2013)…”

               

              Can you recommend a reference or a person that I might contact about goldenrod serving as a primary pollen/nectar source for late-season bees?

               

              So if anyone has any references regarding fall nectar sources and, in particular, the roll of Solidago that would be great. 

               

              I would like to throw out this general observation from collecting that while Goldenrod is certainly worth hunting bees on and, at times, has interesting things like Perdita that its general attractiveness is less compared to Frost Asters.

               

              Thanks 

              sam

               

              Flooded Meadow

               

                         Low dandelion leaves are zoned commercial, 

              with their promise of puffballs to come.

               

                         Bits of dew spackle the high grass 

              asymmetrically; they are sleek apartment windows, 

                         skyscrapers are weeds.

               

                         Tall sprigs of goldenrod patrol 

              the blown-down city line....

               

                         There is another world 

              in this world, but it was not made for you.

               

                         Round oniongrass stalks are old monuments 

              to persistence in hard times. 

                         You could live up inside one 

              and learn to like it, cramped quarters, 

                    & nbsp;    cooking smells and all.

               

                         Two bees report on traffic, warning listeners 

              to the anemophily channel 

                         as the natural disaster 

              of humanity comes closer 

                         every morning. Work while you can, they say.

               

               

                         - STEPHEN BURT

              Bees are Not Optional

              Ong là không bắt buộc

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