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Anthidium manicatum nest?

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  • Charley Eiseman
    Hi all, I m wondering what people think of the suggestion that the object in these photos is a wool carder bee nest:
    Message 1 of 4 , Oct 26, 2013
      Hi all,

      I'm wondering what people think of the suggestion that the object in these photos is a wool carder bee nest:
      I got to examine it in person only after it had become pretty beat-up, but it consisted of hymenopteran cocoons embedded in what seemed to be a synthetic material--under the microscope I saw coarse, coiled fibers that aren't evident in the photos.  All of the cocoons were parasitized by torymids in the genus Monodontomerus, evidently a known associate of Anthidium manicatum.  Has anyone seen an A. manicatum nest that was disc-shaped like this, and does this species ever use manmade materials instead of plant fibers?  

      Thanks for any insights,

      Charley Eiseman


      --
      Ecological services: www.charleyeiseman.com
      Blog: bugtracks.wordpress.com
      Book & natural history programs: www.northernnaturalists.com
    • Cane, Jim
      Charley- you are right, species of Anthidium do pack and close their nests with dense mats of hairs sheered from leaves. However, these look to be imbedded in
      Message 2 of 4 , Oct 28, 2013

        Charley- you are right, species of Anthidium do pack and close their nests with dense mats of hairs sheered from leaves.  However, these look to be imbedded in a mud blob, and in one picture, is that green patch a blob of masticated leaf (something Osmia would use).  My speculation is that Anthidium occupied somebody’s else’s former mud nest.  Where are you located?

         

        Jim

         

        ===============================

        James H. Cane

        USDA-ARS Pollinating Insect Research Unit

        Utah State University, Logan, UT 84322 USA

        tel: 435-797-3879   FAX: 435-797-0461

        email: Jim.Cane@... 

        web page: www.ars.usda.gov/npa/beelab

        publications: http://digitalcommons.usu.edu/piru/

        Gardening for Bees: http://extension.usu.edu/files/publications/factsheet/plants-pollinators09.pdf

         





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      • Charley Eiseman
        Hi Jim, My recollection is that the nest was pretty homogeneous in composition, and that the dirt shown in the later photos was superficial and a result of its
        Message 3 of 4 , Oct 28, 2013
          Hi Jim,

          My recollection is that the nest was pretty homogeneous in composition, and that the dirt shown in the later photos was superficial and a result of its having been knocked down by a snow plow.  The green patch appears to be a living chunk of liverwort that became attached after it had been lying on the ground.  What I didn't explain before is that this nest was found by someone else (in eastern MA) in June 2008, attached to a rock and with torymids crawling around on it; then in February 2009 he picked it up off the ground and sent it to me.  I examined it under a microscope at that time and haven't looked at it since, but once I relocate it (it's packed in a box since I've just moved to a new house) I will dissect the cocoons and see if I can find anything identifiable in them.

          The renewed interest in this nest (if that's what it is) came about because its discoverer recently learned that the torymids belonged to the genus Monodontomerus, and since I had reported that the nest seemed to be composed of a synthetic material and that the cocoons somewhat resembled those of diprionid sawflies, he wondered if the "nest" was actually a manmade object used in distributing M. dentipes for biocontrol of invasive diprionids.  When a torymid specialist was asked if this made any sense, he suggested that it was an Anthidium manicatum nest and noted that Monodontomerus is known to parasitize this species.  The responses I've gotten so far from bee people seem to agree with my assessment that this would be a mighty strange-looking Anthidium nest.

          I'll report back when I get around to dissecting the cocoons.  There is a good chance I will need the help of expert eyes to decipher what I find inside.

          Charley


          On Mon, Oct 28, 2013 at 11:32 AM, Cane, Jim <Jim.Cane@...> wrote:
           

          Charley- you are right, species of Anthidium do pack and close their nests with dense mats of hairs sheered from leaves.  However, these look to be imbedded in a mud blob, and in one picture, is that green patch a blob of masticated leaf (something Osmia would use).  My speculation is that Anthidium occupied somebody’s else’s former mud nest.  Where are you located?

           

          Jim

           

          ===============================

          James H. Cane

          USDA-ARS Pollinating Insect Research Unit

          Utah State University, Logan, UT 84322 USA

          tel: 435-797-3879   FAX: 435-797-0461

          email: Jim.Cane@... 

          web page: www.ars.usda.gov/npa/beelab

          publications: http://digitalcommons.usu.edu/piru/

          Gardening for Bees: http://extension.usu.edu/files/publications/factsheet/plants-pollinators09.pdf

           





          This electronic message contains information generated by the USDA solely for the intended recipients. Any unauthorized interception of this message or the use or disclosure of the information it contains may violate the law and subject the violator to civil or criminal penalties. If you believe you have received this message in error, please notify the sender and delete the email immediately.




          --
          Ecological services: www.charleyeiseman.com
          Blog: bugtracks.wordpress.com
          Book & natural history programs: www.northernnaturalists.com
        • Odo Natasaki
          This is an interesting thread Charley. Cheers, Gord Hutchings ... } (-.-)/{ https://sites.google.com/site/hutchingsbeeservice/announcement
          Message 4 of 4 , Oct 28, 2013
            This is an interesting thread Charley.

            Cheers,

            Gord Hutchings



            > Hi Jim,
            >
            > My recollection is that the nest was pretty homogeneous in composition,
            > and
            > that the dirt shown in the later photos was superficial and a result of
            > its
            > having been knocked down by a snow plow. The green patch appears to be a
            > living chunk of liverwort that became attached after it had been lying on
            > the ground. What I didn't explain before is that this nest was found by
            > someone else (in eastern MA) in June 2008, attached to a rock and with
            > torymids crawling around on it; then in February 2009 he picked it up off
            > the ground and sent it to me. I examined it under a microscope at that
            > time and haven't looked at it since, but once I relocate it (it's packed
            > in
            > a box since I've just moved to a new house) I will dissect the cocoons and
            > see if I can find anything identifiable in them.
            >
            > The renewed interest in this nest (if that's what it is) came about
            > because
            > its discoverer recently learned that the torymids belonged to the genus *
            > Monodontomerus*, and since I had reported that the nest seemed to be
            > composed of a synthetic material and that the cocoons somewhat resembled
            > those of diprionid sawflies, he wondered if the "nest" was actually a
            > manmade object used in distributing *M. dentipes* for biocontrol of
            > invasive diprionids. When a torymid specialist was asked if this made any
            > sense, he suggested that it was an *Anthidium manicatum* nest and noted
            > that *Monodontomerus* is known to parasitize this species. The responses
            > I've gotten so far from bee people seem to agree with my assessment that
            > this would be a mighty strange-looking *Anthidium* nest.
            >
            > I'll report back when I get around to dissecting the cocoons. There is a
            > good chance I will need the help of expert eyes to decipher what I find
            > inside.
            >
            > Charley
            >
            >
            > On Mon, Oct 28, 2013 at 11:32 AM, Cane, Jim <Jim.Cane@...> wrote:
            >
            >> **
            >>
            >>
            >> Charley- you are right, species of Anthidium do pack and close their
            >> nests with dense mats of hairs sheered from leaves. However, these look
            >> to
            >> be imbedded in a mud blob, and in one picture, is that green patch a
            >> blob
            >> of masticated leaf (something Osmia would use). My speculation is that
            >> Anthidium occupied somebody’s else’s former mud nest. Where are you
            >> located?
            >>
            >>
            >>
            >> Jim
            >>
            >>
            >>
            >> ===============================
            >>
            >> James H. Cane
            >>
            >> USDA-ARS Pollinating Insect Research Unit
            >>
            >> Utah State University, Logan, UT 84322 USA
            >>
            >> tel: 435-797-3879 FAX: 435-797-0461
            >>
            >> email: Jim.Cane@...
            >>
            >> web page: *www.ars.usda.gov/npa/beelab*
            >>
            >> publications:* http://digitalcommons.usu.edu/piru/*
            >>
            >> Gardening for Bees:
            >> http://extension.usu.edu/files/publications/factsheet/plants-pollinators09.pdf
            >>
            >>
            >>
            >>
            >>
            >>
            >> This electronic message contains information generated by the USDA
            >> solely
            >> for the intended recipients. Any unauthorized interception of this
            >> message
            >> or the use or disclosure of the information it contains may violate the
            >> law
            >> and subject the violator to civil or criminal penalties. If you believe
            >> you
            >> have received this message in error, please notify the sender and delete
            >> the email immediately.
            >>
            >>
            >>
            >
            >
            >


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