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novice curiosity

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  • roblouopp
    Hello, I am noticing many bumble bees (i THINK they are B. impatiens males) on various asters and sunflowers in peoples yards in Sharon, MA. They don t appear
    Message 1 of 5 , Oct 18, 2013
      Hello,

      I am noticing many bumble bees (i THINK they are B. impatiens males) on various asters and sunflowers in peoples' yards in Sharon, MA. They don't appear to be moving all that much(now around 5 pm), and are resting on top of the flowers. Some have their tongues out probing but some do not. A couple hours ago they seemed much more active. 
      Could anyone shed light on this behavior?

      Thanks!

      Robert
    • pollinator2001
      I just posted photos on my Facebook page of a couple B. impatiens males, one in a morning glory, and the other on a marigold. Both are apparently sleeping
      Message 2 of 5 , Oct 18, 2013

         I just posted photos on my Facebook page of a couple B. impatiens males, one in a morning glory, and the other on a marigold. Both are apparently sleeping (though they will feebly raise a leg, as if in protest, if you wave your fingers close to them). The last generation of bees for the season are the queens to lay over for the winter, and the drones to mate with them. So they are sleeping in the flowers, waiting for their queen.


        My theory is that they wait there, rather than in the nest, to reduce the chances of mating with a sister.


        Dave Green

        Retired pollination contractor

        Coastal SC



        ---In beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com, <roblouopp@...> wrote:

        Hello,

        >I am noticing many bumble bees (i THINK they are B. impatiens males) on various asters and sunflowers in peoples' yards in Sharon, MA. They don't appear to be moving all that much(now around 5 pm), and are resting on top of the flowers. Some have their tongues out probing but some do not. A couple hours ago they seemed much more active. 
        >Could anyone shed light on this behavior?

        Thanks!

        Robert
      • Charles Guevara
        Hello, here in central NY, I notice gatherings of bumble bees on my rasberry bushes...they are lethargic at times..they seem to be feeding  on the
        Message 3 of 5 , Oct 19, 2013
        Hello, here in central NY, I notice gatherings of 'bumble bees' on my rasberry bushes...they are lethargic at times..they seem to be feeding  'on the left-overs' where berries once were attached to the bush.
         
           charlie guevara/fingerlakes,NY


        On Friday, October 18, 2013 6:47 PM, "Pollinator@..." <Pollinator@...> wrote:


         I just posted photos on my Facebook page of a couple B. impatiens males, one in a morning glory, and the other on a marigold. Both are apparently sleeping (though they will feebly raise a leg, as if in protest, if you wave your fingers close to them). The last generation of bees for the season are the queens to lay over for the winter, and the drones to mate with them. So they are sleeping in the flowers, waiting for their queen.

        My theory is that they wait there, rather than in the nest, to reduce the chances of mating with a sister.

        Dave Green
        Retired pollination contractor
        Coastal SC


        ---In beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com, <roblouopp@...> wrote:

        Hello,

        >I am noticing many bumble bees (i THINK they are B. impatiens males) on various asters and sunflowers in peoples' yards in Sharon, MA. They don't appear to be moving all that much(now around 5 pm), and are resting on top of the flowers. Some have their tongues out probing but some do not. A couple hours ago they seemed much more active. 
        >Could anyone shed light on this behavior?

        Thanks!

        Robert




      • Charles Guevara
           I ve noticed these bee gatherings for quite a few weeks...especially when it was cooler weather, and on a variety of diffent flowers.  Whatever they are
        Message 4 of 5 , Oct 19, 2013
           I've noticed these bee gatherings for quite a few weeks...especially when it was cooler weather, and on a variety of diffent flowers.  Whatever they are feeding on...other insects seem to feed on the plant in the same manner.  charlie guevara/fingerlakes,NY


        On , Charles Guevara <icecilliate123@...> wrote:
        Hello, here in central NY, I notice gatherings of 'bumble bees' on my rasberry bushes...they are lethargic at times..they seem to be feeding  'on the left-overs' where berries once were attached to the bush.
         
           charlie guevara/fingerlakes,NY


        On Friday, October 18, 2013 6:47 PM, "Pollinator@..." <Pollinator@...> wrote:


         I just posted photos on my Facebook page of a couple B. impatiens males, one in a morning glory, and the other on a marigold. Both are apparently sleeping (though they will feebly raise a leg, as if in protest, if you wave your fingers close to them). The last generation of bees for the season are the queens to lay over for the winter, and the drones to mate with them. So they are sleeping in the flowers, waiting for their queen.

        My theory is that they wait there, rather than in the nest, to reduce the chances of mating with a sister.

        Dave Green
        Retired pollination contractor
        Coastal SC


        ---In beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com, <roblouopp@...> wrote:

        Hello,

        >I am noticing many bumble bees (i THINK they are B. impatiens males) on various asters and sunflowers in peoples' yards in Sharon, MA. They don't appear to be moving all that much(now around 5 pm), and are resting on top of the flowers. Some have their tongues out probing but some do not. A couple hours ago they seemed much more active. 
        >Could anyone shed light on this behavior?

        Thanks!

        Robert






      • Robert Oppenheimer
        That makes sense! Thanks. Actually tried to touch them a bit too and they did the same leg raising gesture. Robert On Saturday, October 19, 2013 12:10 PM,
        Message 5 of 5 , Oct 19, 2013
          That makes sense! Thanks. Actually tried to touch them a bit too and they did the same leg raising gesture.

          Robert


          On Saturday, October 19, 2013 12:10 PM, Charles Guevara <icecilliate123@...> wrote:
           
          [Attachment(s) from Charles Guevara included below]
             I've noticed these bee gatherings for quite a few weeks...especially when it was cooler weather, and on a variety of diffent flowers.  Whatever they are feeding on...other insects seem to feed on the plant in the same manner.  charlie guevara/fingerlakes,NY


          On , Charles Guevara <icecilliate123@...> wrote:
          Hello, here in central NY, I notice gatherings of 'bumble bees' on my rasberry bushes...they are lethargic at times..they seem to be feeding  'on the left-overs' where berries once were attached to the bush.
           
             charlie guevara/fingerlakes,NY


          On Friday, October 18, 2013 6:47 PM, "Pollinator@..." <Pollinator@...> wrote:


           I just posted photos on my Facebook page of a couple B. impatiens males, one in a morning glory, and the other on a marigold. Both are apparently sleeping (though they will feebly raise a leg, as if in protest, if you wave your fingers close to them). The last generation of bees for the season are the queens to lay over for the winter, and the drones to mate with them. So they are sleeping in the flowers, waiting for their queen.

          My theory is that they wait there, rather than in the nest, to reduce the chances of mating with a sister.

          Dave Green
          Retired pollination contractor
          Coastal SC


          ---In beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com, <roblouopp@...> wrote:

          Hello,

          >I am noticing many bumble bees (i THINK they are B. impatiens males) on various asters and sunflowers in peoples' yards in Sharon, MA. They don't appear to be moving all that much(now around 5 pm), and are resting on top of the flowers. Some have their tongues out probing but some do not. A couple hours ago they seemed much more active. 
          >Could anyone shed light on this behavior?

          Thanks!

          Robert








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