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Re: Graduate Student with Introduction and Questions

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  • Hamblin, April
    Thank you all who have offered suggestions. If this helps, the main goal of the plant I am looking for is to: a. attract a number of native bees, a generalist
    Message 1 of 5 , Sep 18 4:49 AM
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      Thank you all who have offered suggestions. If this helps, the main goal of the plant I am looking for is to: a. attract a number of native bees, a generalist b. preferably an easy annual that is readily available c. a plant that is relatively easy/standard to tell how efficiently it was pollinated.

      I am new at looking at pollination services, so I don't really know what is easier, a fruit, vegetable, herb, ect? Any suggestions or thoughts on this would also greatly help. Thank you so much for your time.

      Also, I am considering monitoring some type of heat stress such as heat ramping or looking into the heat stress proteins. I am new at this, so any advice is appreciated. I thank you very much for your help.

      I appreciate the kind words, Dr. Griswold. The Bee Course was the best week of my life. haha.

      Thanks again, I appreciate these ideas!
      Sincerely,
      April Hamblin
      NCSU PhD Entomology Program
      (609)513-3930




      On Tue, Sep 17, 2013 at 5:56 PM, Hamblin, April <hamblina@...> wrote:
      Hello, all, my name is April Hamblin and I would like to introduce myself. I am a new graduate student at NCSU that was fortunate enough to be selected for this years Bee Course. 

      We had an amazing time--I hope many of you have experienced The Bee Course.

      Anyway, I am working on ideas about studying native bee assemblages in urban areas. 

      I want to look at a few things, but plan to survey some study sites as step one.

      Eventually, if I want to look at pollination services by bringing in a specific plan to different sites, preferably an annual, that would attract many bees, a generalist plant, does anyone have any good suggestions?

      I've already had a couple great suggestions from Dr. Cane and Sam, but am simply putting my feelers out to what is available/acceptable because I do not know much about phenology or plants at the moment.

      Thank you so much for your time and I hope to talk soon!

      Sincerely, April Hamblin
      NCSU PhD Program Entomology
      (609)513-3930



    • pollinator2001
      ... Watermelons are easy. Simply count the ratio of mature seeds to undeveloped (white) seeds. (Won t work with seedless hybrids, of course.) Cucumbers will
      Message 2 of 5 , Sep 19 7:44 AM
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        --- In beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com, "Hamblin, April" <hamblina@...> wrote:
        >
        > preferably an easy annual that is readily available c. a
        > plant that is relatively easy/standard to tell how efficiently it was
        > pollinated.


        Watermelons are easy. Simply count the ratio of mature seeds to undeveloped (white) seeds. (Won't work with seedless hybrids, of course.)

        Cucumbers will show you by their shape. http://gardensouth.org/2011/07/21/why-are-my-cucumber-falling-off-or-becoming-deformed/

        Apples(or pomes in general) are also easy. Cut crosswise and count the seeds. Most cultivars have ten seeds for perfect pollination, though a few varieties can have twelve or more. If you have 4-6 seeds, the quality, shape, and size will be noticeably inferior, and if you have less than 4, the apple will usually go down in the June drop.

        Dave
        Retired pollination contractor
      • pollinator2001
        For some reason the line break messed up the link to the cucumber article. You can find it by going to http://gardensouth.org/ , then choosing cucumbers from
        Message 3 of 5 , Sep 19 7:50 AM
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          For some reason the line break messed up the link to the cucumber article. You can find it by going to http://gardensouth.org/ , then choosing cucumbers from the categories, and it's the second article.

          Dave
          Retired pollination contractor





          --- In beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com, "pollinator2001" <Pollinator@...> wrote:
          >
          >
          >
          > --- In beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com, "Hamblin, April" <hamblina@> wrote:
          > >
          > > preferably an easy annual that is readily available c. a
          > > plant that is relatively easy/standard to tell how efficiently it was
          > > pollinated.
          >
          >
          > Watermelons are easy. Simply count the ratio of mature seeds to undeveloped (white) seeds. (Won't work with seedless hybrids, of course.)
          >
          > Cucumbers will show you by their shape. http://gardensouth.org/2011/07/21/why-are-my-cucumber-falling-off-or-becoming-deformed/
          >
          > Apples(or pomes in general) are also easy. Cut crosswise and count the seeds. Most cultivars have ten seeds for perfect pollination, though a few varieties can have twelve or more. If you have 4-6 seeds, the quality, shape, and size will be noticeably inferior, and if you have less than 4, the apple will usually go down in the June drop.
          >
          > Dave
          > Retired pollination contractor
          >
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