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Graduate Student with Introduction and Questions

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  • Hamblin, April
    Hello, all, my name is April Hamblin and I would like to introduce myself. I am a new graduate student at NCSU that was fortunate enough to be selected for
    Message 1 of 5 , Sep 17, 2013
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      Hello, all, my name is April Hamblin and I would like to introduce myself. I am a new graduate student at NCSU that was fortunate enough to be selected for this years Bee Course. 

      We had an amazing time--I hope many of you have experienced The Bee Course.

      Anyway, I am working on ideas about studying native bee assemblages in urban areas. 

      I want to look at a few things, but plan to survey some study sites as step one.

      Eventually, if I want to look at pollination services by bringing in a specific plan to different sites, preferably an annual, that would attract many bees, a generalist plant, does anyone have any good suggestions?

      I've already had a couple great suggestions from Dr. Cane and Sam, but am simply putting my feelers out to what is available/acceptable because I do not know much about phenology or plants at the moment.

      Thank you so much for your time and I hope to talk soon!

      Sincerely, April Hamblin
      NCSU PhD Program Entomology
      (609)513-3930


    • Anita M. Collins
      We have had a wide variety of things coming to mountain mint, which is a late summer/fall bloomer. Trailing off right now in PA. Mints in general are
      Message 2 of 5 , Sep 17, 2013
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        We have had a wide variety of things coming to mountain mint, which is a late summer/fall bloomer.  Trailing off right now in PA.  Mints in general are considered good bee plants. 
        Anita Collins
         
         
         
        If we knew what we were doing, it wouldn't be called research.
        Albert Einstein
         
        On 09/17/13, Hamblin, April<hamblina@...> wrote:
         
         

        Hello, all, my name is April Hamblin and I would like to introduce myself. I am a new graduate student at NCSU that was fortunate enough to be selected for this years Bee Course. 

        We had an amazing time--I hope many of you have experienced The Bee Course.

        Anyway, I am working on ideas about studying native bee assemblages in urban areas. 

        I want to look at a few things, but plan to survey some study sites as step one.

        Eventually, if I want to look at pollination services by bringing in a specific plan to different sites, preferably an annual, that would attract many bees, a generalist plant, does anyone have any good suggestions?

        I've already had a couple great suggestions from Dr. Cane and Sam, but am simply putting my feelers out to what is available/acceptable because I do not know much about phenology or plants at the moment.

        Thank you so much for your time and I hope to talk soon!

        Sincerely, April Hamblin
        NCSU PhD Program Entomology
        (609)513-3930


      • Hamblin, April
        Thank you all who have offered suggestions. If this helps, the main goal of the plant I am looking for is to: a. attract a number of native bees, a generalist
        Message 3 of 5 , Sep 18, 2013
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          Thank you all who have offered suggestions. If this helps, the main goal of the plant I am looking for is to: a. attract a number of native bees, a generalist b. preferably an easy annual that is readily available c. a plant that is relatively easy/standard to tell how efficiently it was pollinated.

          I am new at looking at pollination services, so I don't really know what is easier, a fruit, vegetable, herb, ect? Any suggestions or thoughts on this would also greatly help. Thank you so much for your time.

          Also, I am considering monitoring some type of heat stress such as heat ramping or looking into the heat stress proteins. I am new at this, so any advice is appreciated. I thank you very much for your help.

          I appreciate the kind words, Dr. Griswold. The Bee Course was the best week of my life. haha.

          Thanks again, I appreciate these ideas!
          Sincerely,
          April Hamblin
          NCSU PhD Entomology Program
          (609)513-3930




          On Tue, Sep 17, 2013 at 5:56 PM, Hamblin, April <hamblina@...> wrote:
          Hello, all, my name is April Hamblin and I would like to introduce myself. I am a new graduate student at NCSU that was fortunate enough to be selected for this years Bee Course. 

          We had an amazing time--I hope many of you have experienced The Bee Course.

          Anyway, I am working on ideas about studying native bee assemblages in urban areas. 

          I want to look at a few things, but plan to survey some study sites as step one.

          Eventually, if I want to look at pollination services by bringing in a specific plan to different sites, preferably an annual, that would attract many bees, a generalist plant, does anyone have any good suggestions?

          I've already had a couple great suggestions from Dr. Cane and Sam, but am simply putting my feelers out to what is available/acceptable because I do not know much about phenology or plants at the moment.

          Thank you so much for your time and I hope to talk soon!

          Sincerely, April Hamblin
          NCSU PhD Program Entomology
          (609)513-3930



        • pollinator2001
          ... Watermelons are easy. Simply count the ratio of mature seeds to undeveloped (white) seeds. (Won t work with seedless hybrids, of course.) Cucumbers will
          Message 4 of 5 , Sep 19, 2013
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            --- In beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com, "Hamblin, April" <hamblina@...> wrote:
            >
            > preferably an easy annual that is readily available c. a
            > plant that is relatively easy/standard to tell how efficiently it was
            > pollinated.


            Watermelons are easy. Simply count the ratio of mature seeds to undeveloped (white) seeds. (Won't work with seedless hybrids, of course.)

            Cucumbers will show you by their shape. http://gardensouth.org/2011/07/21/why-are-my-cucumber-falling-off-or-becoming-deformed/

            Apples(or pomes in general) are also easy. Cut crosswise and count the seeds. Most cultivars have ten seeds for perfect pollination, though a few varieties can have twelve or more. If you have 4-6 seeds, the quality, shape, and size will be noticeably inferior, and if you have less than 4, the apple will usually go down in the June drop.

            Dave
            Retired pollination contractor
          • pollinator2001
            For some reason the line break messed up the link to the cucumber article. You can find it by going to http://gardensouth.org/ , then choosing cucumbers from
            Message 5 of 5 , Sep 19, 2013
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              For some reason the line break messed up the link to the cucumber article. You can find it by going to http://gardensouth.org/ , then choosing cucumbers from the categories, and it's the second article.

              Dave
              Retired pollination contractor





              --- In beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com, "pollinator2001" <Pollinator@...> wrote:
              >
              >
              >
              > --- In beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com, "Hamblin, April" <hamblina@> wrote:
              > >
              > > preferably an easy annual that is readily available c. a
              > > plant that is relatively easy/standard to tell how efficiently it was
              > > pollinated.
              >
              >
              > Watermelons are easy. Simply count the ratio of mature seeds to undeveloped (white) seeds. (Won't work with seedless hybrids, of course.)
              >
              > Cucumbers will show you by their shape. http://gardensouth.org/2011/07/21/why-are-my-cucumber-falling-off-or-becoming-deformed/
              >
              > Apples(or pomes in general) are also easy. Cut crosswise and count the seeds. Most cultivars have ten seeds for perfect pollination, though a few varieties can have twelve or more. If you have 4-6 seeds, the quality, shape, and size will be noticeably inferior, and if you have less than 4, the apple will usually go down in the June drop.
              >
              > Dave
              > Retired pollination contractor
              >
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