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Peponapis/Xenoglossa

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  • Doug Yanega
    Hi, all. I ve been contacted by a French-based nature documentary company interested in filming matinal cucurbit bees (Peponapis/Xenoglossa) in the southwest.
    Message 1 of 6 , Sep 5, 2013
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      Hi, all. I've been contacted by a French-based nature documentary
      company interested in filming matinal cucurbit bees
      (Peponapis/Xenoglossa) in the southwest. Does anyone have definitive
      localities and times of year where they could *guarantee* an active
      population that could be filmed? I am fairly certain that they are
      excluding eastern populations from consideration, but if all else fails,
      it might not hurt if they had at least one place for guaranteed filming
      (clearly, flying a film crew over from France is not worth it if they
      have to rely on luck to find something).

      Thanks in advance,

      --
      Doug Yanega Dept. of Entomology Entomology Research Museum
      Univ. of California, Riverside, CA 92521-0314 skype: dyanega
      phone: (951) 827-4315 (disclaimer: opinions are mine, not UCR's)
      http://cache.ucr.edu/~heraty/yanega.html
      "There are some enterprises in which a careful disorderliness
      is the true method" - Herman Melville, Moby Dick, Chap. 82
    • Gordon C. Snelling
      Doug In my experience the best place to be sure of finding them is in a home garden with plenty of squash plants. Gordon
      Message 2 of 6 , Sep 5, 2013
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        Doug
        In my experience the best place to be sure of finding them is in a home garden with plenty of squash plants.
        Gordon

        On 9/5/2013 9:59 AM, Doug Yanega wrote:
         

        Hi, all. I've been contacted by a French-based nature documentary
        company interested in filming matinal cucurbit bees
        (Peponapis/Xenoglossa) in the southwest. Does anyone have definitive
        localities and times of year where they could *guarantee* an active
        population that could be filmed? I am fairly certain that they are
        excluding eastern populations from consideration, but if all else fails,
        it might not hurt if they had at least one place for guaranteed filming
        (clearly, flying a film crew over from France is not worth it if they
        have to rely on luck to find something).

        Thanks in advance,

        --
        Doug Yanega Dept. of Entomology Entomology Research Museum
        Univ. of California, Riverside, CA 92521-0314 skype: dyanega
        phone: (951) 827-4315 (disclaimer: opinions are mine, not UCR's)
        http://cache.ucr.edu/~heraty/yanega.html
        "There are some enterprises in which a careful disorderliness
        is the true method" - Herman Melville, Moby Dick, Chap. 82


      • John Mola
        Doug, It s worth contacting Jim Cane directly (if he doesn t see this) since he has a Squash Pollinator Abundance Survey (SPAS) project going. Many locations
        Message 3 of 6 , Sep 5, 2013
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          Doug,

          It's worth contacting Jim Cane directly (if he doesn't see this) since he has a Squash Pollinator Abundance Survey (SPAS) project going. Many locations looking at squash bees across years, very well documented.

          John


          On Thu, Sep 5, 2013 at 9:59 AM, Doug Yanega <dyanega@...> wrote:
           

          Hi, all. I've been contacted by a French-based nature documentary
          company interested in filming matinal cucurbit bees
          (Peponapis/Xenoglossa) in the southwest. Does anyone have definitive
          localities and times of year where they could *guarantee* an active
          population that could be filmed? I am fairly certain that they are
          excluding eastern populations from consideration, but if all else fails,
          it might not hurt if they had at least one place for guaranteed filming
          (clearly, flying a film crew over from France is not worth it if they
          have to rely on luck to find something).

          Thanks in advance,

          --
          Doug Yanega Dept. of Entomology Entomology Research Museum
          Univ. of California, Riverside, CA 92521-0314 skype: dyanega
          phone: (951) 827-4315 (disclaimer: opinions are mine, not UCR's)
          http://cache.ucr.edu/~heraty/yanega.html
          "There are some enterprises in which a careful disorderliness
          is the true method" - Herman Melville, Moby Dick, Chap. 82




          --
          John Mola
          JohnMMola@...




        • Stoner, Kimberly
          Hi all, If they have not completely excluded eastern US locations, I have farms where I have seen and counted Peponapis pruinosa for three years running in CT.
          Message 4 of 6 , Sep 5, 2013
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            Hi all,

            If they have not completely excluded eastern US locations, I have farms where I have seen and counted Peponapis pruinosa for three years running in CT. I could give them dates when we found peak numbers on pumpkins.

            Kim

             

            From: beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com [mailto:beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Doug Yanega
            Sent: Thursday, September 05, 2013 1:00 PM
            To: beemon
            Subject: [beemonitoring] Peponapis/Xenoglossa

             

             

            Hi, all. I've been contacted by a French-based nature documentary
            company interested in filming matinal cucurbit bees
            (Peponapis/Xenoglossa) in the southwest. Does anyone have definitive
            localities and times of year where they could *guarantee* an active
            population that could be filmed? I am fairly certain that they are
            excluding eastern populations from consideration, but if all else fails,
            it might not hurt if they had at least one place for guaranteed filming
            (clearly, flying a film crew over from France is not worth it if they
            have to rely on luck to find something).

            Thanks in advance,

            --
            Doug Yanega Dept. of Entomology Entomology Research Museum
            Univ. of California, Riverside, CA 92521-0314 skype: dyanega
            phone: (951) 827-4315 (disclaimer: opinions are mine, not UCR's)
            http://cache.ucr.edu/~heraty/yanega.html
            "There are some enterprises in which a careful disorderliness
            is the true method" - Herman Melville, Moby Dick, Chap. 82

          • pollinator2001
            ... In western NY, you can look for a long time for a single one on commercial farms. I know. I checked for five years in a row, and found one single one in
            Message 5 of 6 , Sep 6, 2013
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              --- In beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com, "Stoner, Kimberly" <Kimberly.Stoner@...> wrote:
              >
              > Hi all,
              > If they have not completely excluded eastern US locations, I have farms where I have seen and counted Peponapis pruinosa for three years running in CT. I could give them dates when we found peak numbers on pumpkins.


              In western NY, you can look for a long time for a single one on commercial farms. I know. I checked for five years in a row, and found one single one in all that time, and I checked often before daybreak, as well as checking closed blossoms later in the day for males. They simply are not in large fields.

              On the other hand, in garden plantings, you can often find 2-3 squash bees per flower.

              Dave Green
              Retired pollination contractor
            • Doug Yanega
              Thanks to those who responded. I should have explained that this was only in the early planning stages, so there is ample time for them to prepare. They were
              Message 6 of 6 , Sep 7, 2013
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                Thanks to those who responded. I should have explained that this was
                only in the early planning stages, so there is ample time for them to
                prepare. They were just trying to see if there is a time and place that
                could be pinned down so they would know for certain they would have some
                useful footage in case their planned field site in Mexico is a bust.

                Peace,

                --
                Doug Yanega Dept. of Entomology Entomology Research Museum
                Univ. of California, Riverside, CA 92521-0314 skype: dyanega
                phone: (951) 827-4315 (disclaimer: opinions are mine, not UCR's)
                http://cache.ucr.edu/~heraty/yanega.html
                "There are some enterprises in which a careful disorderliness
                is the true method" - Herman Melville, Moby Dick, Chap. 82
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