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Re: Fw: [beemonitoring] Photographing bees & no-kill identification tools

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  • Lary, Sandra
    Great, creative suggestions Brian and Charlie, I am very interested in learning about any additional no-kill ID tools that people are using - - if anyone has
    Message 1 of 5 , Sep 4, 2013
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      Great, creative suggestions Brian and Charlie, I am very interested in learning about any additional no-kill ID tools that people are using - - if anyone has more please forward.

      Thank you!
      Sandra

      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

      Sandra J. Lary, Senior Fish & Wildlife Biologist

      U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service-Ecological Services

      Gulf of Maine Coastal Program

      4R Fundy Rd

      Falmouth, ME 04105

      207-781-8364, etx.19 



      On Wed, Aug 28, 2013 at 6:50 PM, Charles Guevara <icecilliate123@...> wrote:
       

        Hello all in forum, I need comments and opinion.  But first my suggestion of: fresh apple slice sedation for field image capture of bees and hornets...I never thought to try it with wasps...but it works even with huge 'European Hornets' in my central NY orchard.
       
         After the apple slice induced torpor...the bee can be manipulated for measurements, image capture...and I guess gentle marking/ swabbing for pollen or parasitic mites.
       
         This is a suggested field protocol for 'hands on/no kill identification'.  all the best, charlie guevara/fingerlakes,NY

      From: "Droege, Sam" <sdroege@...>
      To: Charles Guevara <icecilliate123@...>
      Sent: Wednesday, August 28, 2013 12:38 PM
      Subject: Re: Fw: [beemonitoring] Photographing bees & no kill identification - a tool
      Charlie...

      That is very cool.

      I will have to try.

      sam


      On Wed, Aug 28, 2013 at 12:34 PM, Charles Guevara <icecilliate123@...> wrote:
       

      ----- Forwarded Message -----
      From: Charles Guevara <icecilliate123@...>
      To: Brian Dykstra <brianjdykstra@...>
      Sent: Wednesday, August 28, 2013 12:33 PM
      Subject: Re: [beemonitoring] Photographing bees & no kill identification - a tool [1 Attachment]
         Hello, I notice in central NY, a simple fresh slice of apple ( I've used several varieties of apple)...placed in a plastic jar with good seal lid..somehow narcotizes /entrances bees and hornets of various sizes..right up to huge: 'European hornets'.
       
         After a few minutes you can gently slide the 'bee on apple' out of the container...place it on a white paper plate for good background...and image capture the nearly imobile organism.  The specimen recovers normal behavior after a short time.  I can post a few images to forum...as I do have questions about the large 'bees' that have attacked my fence poles, and my woodshed rafters.
       
         Please try fresh apple slice in tight seal plastic jar..it works in my orchard with all sorts of bees, hornets that I tried it with.  just a suggestion, charlie guevara

      From: Brian Dykstra <brianjdykstra@...>
      To: "beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com" <beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Tuesday, August 27, 2013 5:52 PM
      Subject: [beemonitoring] Photographing bees & no kill identification - a tool [1 Attachment]
      [Attachment(s) from Brian Dykstra included below]
      Dear all,

      I wanted to catch, photograph, and release bees, wasps and other insects for identification, after net capture in the field.  I had help from a colleague in creating a plexiglass container with a slide top and a foam plunger.  What we created is similar to the queen marking cage & plunger used by some in honey bee keeping practices, except our has a square shape and a glass top for ease in quality photography without distortion.  We made an optional screen slide for the top to for collecting pollen with toothpicks.    

      I am finding this small hand held device useful for identifying some Hymenoptera in a nearby field.  Attached here is a collage of some recent photos of the device in use.  I encourage 'bee monitors' to consider developing their own prototypes or useful "bee holders". 

      As more local/regional bee field guides (physical and online) are created, tools like this may aid novice 'bee watchers', much like field guides and binoculars aided the popularity of birding.  Capture and release tools like this may provide all the level of taxonomic clarity novice bee watchers desire, as well as aid non-destructive citizen science projects.

      Thanks for reading
      Sincerely,

      Brian J. Dykstra
      Attachment(s) from Brian Dykstra
      1 of 1 Photo(s)
      --
      Bees are Not Optional
      Ong là không bắt buộc


    • T'ai Roulston
      I didn t have any luck with the apple slice in a jar and a bumble bee. The bumble bee was still quite active after half an hour. I used a glass jar rather than
      Message 2 of 5 , Sep 4, 2013
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        I didn't have any luck with the apple slice in a jar and a bumble bee. The bumble bee was still quite active after half an hour. I used a glass jar rather than plastic and the jar was pint sized. Presumably the mode of action would be CO2 production from the sliced apple, as CO2 is well known to knock out bees. Perhaps my jar was too big.

        Karen Goodell's lab has a nice YouTube video that includes knocking out bees for identification using a compressed gas duster can, like those for cleaning computer keyboards.


        T'ai

        On Sep 4, 2013, at 9:40 AM, Lary, Sandra wrote:

         

        Great, creative suggestions Brian and Charlie, I am very interested in learning about any additional no-kill ID tools that people are using - - if anyone has more please forward.

        Thank you!
        Sandra

        ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

        Sandra J. Lary, Senior Fish & Wildlife Biologist

        U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service-Ecological Services

        Gulf of Maine Coastal Program

        4R Fundy Rd

        Falmouth, ME 04105

        207-781-8364, etx.19 



        On Wed, Aug 28, 2013 at 6:50 PM, Charles Guevara <icecilliate123@...> wrote:
         

          Hello all in forum, I need comments and opinion.  But first my suggestion of: fresh apple slice sedation for field image capture of bees and hornets...I never thought to try it with wasps...but it works even with huge 'European Hornets' in my central NY orchard.
         
           After the apple slice induced torpor...the bee can be manipulated for measurements, image capture...and I guess gentle marking/ swabbing for pollen or parasitic mites.
         
           This is a suggested field protocol for 'hands on/no kill identification'.  all the best, charlie guevara/fingerlakes,NY

        From: "Droege, Sam" <sdroege@...>
        To: Charles Guevara <icecilliate123@...>
        Sent: Wednesday, August 28, 2013 12:38 PM
        Subject: Re: Fw: [beemonitoring] Photographing bees & no kill identification - a tool
        Charlie...

        That is very cool.

        I will have to try.

        sam


        On Wed, Aug 28, 2013 at 12:34 PM, Charles Guevara <icecilliate123@...> wrote:
         

        ----- Forwarded Message -----
        From: Charles Guevara <icecilliate123@...>
        To: Brian Dykstra <brianjdykstra@...>
        Sent: Wednesday, August 28, 2013 12:33 PM
        Subject: Re: [beemonitoring] Photographing bees & no kill identification - a tool [1 Attachment]
           Hello, I notice in central NY, a simple fresh slice of apple ( I've used several varieties of apple)...placed in a plastic jar with good seal lid..somehow narcotizes /entrances bees and hornets of various sizes..right up to huge: 'European hornets'.
         
           After a few minutes you can gently slide the 'bee on apple' out of the container...place it on a white paper plate for good background...and image capture the nearly imobile organism.  The specimen recovers normal behavior after a short time.  I can post a few images to forum...as I do have questions about the large 'bees' that have attacked my fence poles, and my woodshed rafters.
         
           Please try fresh apple slice in tight seal plastic jar..it works in my orchard with all sorts of bees, hornets that I tried it with.  just a suggestion, charlie guevara

        From: Brian Dykstra <brianjdykstra@...>
        To: "beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com" <beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Tuesday, August 27, 2013 5:52 PM
        Subject: [beemonitoring] Photographing bees & no kill identification - a tool [1 Attachment]
        [Attachment(s) from Brian Dykstra included below]
        Dear all,

        I wanted to catch, photograph, and release bees, wasps and other insects for identification, after net capture in the field.  I had help from a colleague in creating a plexiglass container with a slide top and a foam plunger.  What we created is similar to the queen marking cage & plunger used by some in honey bee keeping practices, except our has a square shape and a glass top for ease in quality photography without distortion.  We made an optional screen slide for the top to for collecting pollen with toothpicks.    

        I am finding this small hand held device useful for identifying some Hymenoptera in a nearby field.  Attached here is a collage of some recent photos of the device in use.  I encourage 'bee monitors' to consider developing their own prototypes or useful "bee holders". 

        As more local/regional bee field guides (physical and online) are created, tools like this may aid novice 'bee watchers', much like field guides and binoculars aided the popularity of birding.  Capture and release tools like this may provide all the level of taxonomic clarity novice bee watchers desire, as well as aid non-destructive citizen science projects.

        Thanks for reading
        Sincerely,

        Brian J. Dykstra
        Attachment(s) from Brian Dykstra
        1 of 1 Photo(s)
        --
        Bees are Not Optional
        Ong là không bắt buộc




        T'ai Roulston
        Curator, State Arboretum of Virginia
        Research Assoc. Prof., Dept of Envi. Sci.
        University of Virginia



      • Gordon W. FRANKIE
        We use a very simple method to slow down bees for observation and Env. Ed. classes at UC Berkeley. Net the bee of interest and transfer it to a small glass
        Message 3 of 5 , Sep 4, 2013
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          We use a very simple method to slow down bees for observation and Env. Ed. classes at UC Berkeley.  Net the bee of interest and transfer it to a small glass jar (with paper inside) that has been in an ice chest for sometime.  After 20 minutes or so in the ice chest, one can handle the bee for several minutes before it warms up.  Then let it fly off.  No Chemicals.  The subdued bee can also be examined for identification purposes.  Kids like to see the bee fly off and continue its work.

          Gordon 


          On Wed, Sep 4, 2013 at 7:41 AM, T'ai Roulston <thr8z@...> wrote:
           

          I didn't have any luck with the apple slice in a jar and a bumble bee. The bumble bee was still quite active after half an hour. I used a glass jar rather than plastic and the jar was pint sized. Presumably the mode of action would be CO2 production from the sliced apple, as CO2 is well known to knock out bees. Perhaps my jar was too big.


          Karen Goodell's lab has a nice YouTube video that includes knocking out bees for identification using a compressed gas duster can, like those for cleaning computer keyboards.


          T'ai

          On Sep 4, 2013, at 9:40 AM, Lary, Sandra wrote:

           

          Great, creative suggestions Brian and Charlie, I am very interested in learning about any additional no-kill ID tools that people are using - - if anyone has more please forward.

          Thank you!
          Sandra

          ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

          Sandra J. Lary, Senior Fish & Wildlife Biologist

          U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service-Ecological Services

          Gulf of Maine Coastal Program

          4R Fundy Rd

          Falmouth, ME 04105

          207-781-8364, etx.19 



          On Wed, Aug 28, 2013 at 6:50 PM, Charles Guevara <icecilliate123@...> wrote:
           

            Hello all in forum, I need comments and opinion.  But first my suggestion of: fresh apple slice sedation for field image capture of bees and hornets...I never thought to try it with wasps...but it works even with huge 'European Hornets' in my central NY orchard.
           
             After the apple slice induced torpor...the bee can be manipulated for measurements, image capture...and I guess gentle marking/ swabbing for pollen or parasitic mites.
           
             This is a suggested field protocol for 'hands on/no kill identification'.  all the best, charlie guevara/fingerlakes,NY

          From: "Droege, Sam" <sdroege@...>
          To: Charles Guevara <icecilliate123@...>
          Sent: Wednesday, August 28, 2013 12:38 PM
          Subject: Re: Fw: [beemonitoring] Photographing bees & no kill identification - a tool
          Charlie...

          That is very cool.

          I will have to try.

          sam


          On Wed, Aug 28, 2013 at 12:34 PM, Charles Guevara <icecilliate123@...> wrote:
           

          ----- Forwarded Message -----
          From: Charles Guevara <icecilliate123@...>
          To: Brian Dykstra <brianjdykstra@...>
          Sent: Wednesday, August 28, 2013 12:33 PM
          Subject: Re: [beemonitoring] Photographing bees & no kill identification - a tool [1 Attachment]
             Hello, I notice in central NY, a simple fresh slice of apple ( I've used several varieties of apple)...placed in a plastic jar with good seal lid..somehow narcotizes /entrances bees and hornets of various sizes..right up to huge: 'European hornets'.
           
             After a few minutes you can gently slide the 'bee on apple' out of the container...place it on a white paper plate for good background...and image capture the nearly imobile organism.  The specimen recovers normal behavior after a short time.  I can post a few images to forum...as I do have questions about the large 'bees' that have attacked my fence poles, and my woodshed rafters.
           
             Please try fresh apple slice in tight seal plastic jar..it works in my orchard with all sorts of bees, hornets that I tried it with.  just a suggestion, charlie guevara

          From: Brian Dykstra <brianjdykstra@...>
          To: "beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com" <beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com>
          Sent: Tuesday, August 27, 2013 5:52 PM
          Subject: [beemonitoring] Photographing bees & no kill identification - a tool [1 Attachment]
          [Attachment(s) from Brian Dykstra included below]
          Dear all,

          I wanted to catch, photograph, and release bees, wasps and other insects for identification, after net capture in the field.  I had help from a colleague in creating a plexiglass container with a slide top and a foam plunger.  What we created is similar to the queen marking cage & plunger used by some in honey bee keeping practices, except our has a square shape and a glass top for ease in quality photography without distortion.  We made an optional screen slide for the top to for collecting pollen with toothpicks.    

          I am finding this small hand held device useful for identifying some Hymenoptera in a nearby field.  Attached here is a collage of some recent photos of the device in use.  I encourage 'bee monitors' to consider developing their own prototypes or useful "bee holders". 

          As more local/regional bee field guides (physical and online) are created, tools like this may aid novice 'bee watchers', much like field guides and binoculars aided the popularity of birding.  Capture and release tools like this may provide all the level of taxonomic clarity novice bee watchers desire, as well as aid non-destructive citizen science projects.

          Thanks for reading
          Sincerely,

          Brian J. Dykstra
          Attachment(s) from Brian Dykstra
          1 of 1 Photo(s)
          --
          Bees are Not Optional
          Ong là không bắt buộc




          T'ai Roulston
          Curator, State Arboretum of Virginia
          Research Assoc. Prof., Dept of Envi. Sci.
          University of Virginia




        • <Gordon.Hutchings@...>
          This same technique was and probably still is used in photography for some specimens. It was widely done in the odonatological community for photography for
          Message 4 of 5 , Sep 4, 2013
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            This same technique was and probably still is used in photography for some specimens. It was widely done in the odonatological community for photography for instance, hence one author's book having photos with the caption "posed" or lack thereof beside each image. Some folks utilised dry-ice and had the focal/focus all set to go when the specimen was placed in an appropriate perch to look natural.
             
            Gord Hutchings
            Victoria, BC

            From: beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com [mailto:beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Gordon W. FRANKIE
            Sent: Wednesday, 4, September, 2013 08:16 AM
            To: T'ai Roulston
            Cc: Lary, Sandra; Charles Guevara; beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: Re: [beemonitoring] Photographing bees & no-kill identification tools

             

            We use a very simple method to slow down bees for observation and Env. Ed. classes at UC Berkeley.  Net the bee of interest and transfer it to a small glass jar (with paper inside) that has been in an ice chest for sometime.  After 20 minutes or so in the ice chest, one can handle the bee for several minutes before it warms up.  Then let it fly off.  No Chemicals.  The subdued bee can also be examined for identification purposes.  Kids like to see the bee fly off and continue its work.

            Gordon 


            On Wed, Sep 4, 2013 at 7:41 AM, T'ai Roulston <thr8z@...> wrote:
             

            I didn't have any luck with the apple slice in a jar and a bumble bee. The bumble bee was still quite active after half an hour. I used a glass jar rather than plastic and the jar was pint sized. Presumably the mode of action would be CO2 production from the sliced apple, as CO2 is well known to knock out bees. Perhaps my jar was too big.


            Karen Goodell's lab has a nice YouTube video that includes knocking out bees for identification using a compressed gas duster can, like those for cleaning computer keyboards.


            T'ai

            On Sep 4, 2013, at 9:40 AM, Lary, Sandra wrote:

             

            Great, creative suggestions Brian and Charlie, I am very interested in learning about any additional no-kill ID tools that people are using - - if anyone has more please forward.

            Thank you!
            Sandra

            ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

            Sandra J. Lary, Senior Fish & Wildlife Biologist

            U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service-Ecological Services

            Gulf of Maine Coastal Program

            4R Fundy Rd

            Falmouth, ME 04105

            207-781-8364, etx.19 



            On Wed, Aug 28, 2013 at 6:50 PM, Charles Guevara <icecilliate123@...> wrote:
             

              Hello all in forum, I need comments and opinion.  But first my suggestion of: fresh apple slice sedation for field image capture of bees and hornets...I never thought to try it with wasps...but it works even with huge 'European Hornets' in my central NY orchard.
             
               After the apple slice induced torpor...the bee can be manipulated for measurements, image capture...and I guess gentle marking/ swabbing for pollen or parasitic mites.
             
               This is a suggested field protocol for 'hands on/no kill identification'.  all the best, charlie guevara/fingerlakes,NY

            From: "Droege, Sam" <sdroege@...>
            To: Charles Guevara <icecilliate123@...>
            Sent: Wednesday, August 28, 2013 12:38 PM
            Subject: Re: Fw: [beemonitoring] Photographing bees & no kill identification - a tool
            Charlie...

            That is very cool.

            I will have to try.

            sam


            On Wed, Aug 28, 2013 at 12:34 PM, Charles Guevara <icecilliate123@...> wrote:
             

            ----- Forwarded Message -----
            From: Charles Guevara <icecilliate123@...>
            To: Brian Dykstra <brianjdykstra@...>
            Sent: Wednesday, August 28, 2013 12:33 PM
            Subject: Re: [beemonitoring] Photographing bees & no kill identification - a tool [1 Attachment]
               Hello, I notice in central NY, a simple fresh slice of apple ( I've used several varieties of apple)...placed in a plastic jar with good seal lid..somehow narcotizes /entrances bees and hornets of various sizes..right up to huge: 'European hornets'.
             
               After a few minutes you can gently slide the 'bee on apple' out of the container...place it on a white paper plate for good background...and image capture the nearly imobile organism.  The specimen recovers normal behavior after a short time.  I can post a few images to forum...as I do have questions about the large 'bees' that have attacked my fence poles, and my woodshed rafters.
             
               Please try fresh apple slice in tight seal plastic jar..it works in my orchard with all sorts of bees, hornets that I tried it with.  just a suggestion, charlie guevara

            From: Brian Dykstra <brianjdykstra@...>
            To: "beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com" <beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com>
            Sent: Tuesday, August 27, 2013 5:52 PM
            Subject: [beemonitoring] Photographing bees & no kill identification - a tool [1 Attachment]
            [Attachment(s) from Brian Dykstra included below]
            Dear all,

            I wanted to catch, photograph, and release bees, wasps and other insects for identification, after net capture in the field.  I had help from a colleague in creating a plexiglass container with a slide top and a foam plunger.  What we created is similar to the queen marking cage & plunger used by some in honey bee keeping practices, except our has a square shape and a glass top for ease in quality photography without distortion.  We made an optional screen slide for the top to for collecting pollen with toothpicks.    

            I am finding this small hand held device useful for identifying some Hymenoptera in a nearby field.  Attached here is a collage of some recent photos of the device in use.  I encourage 'bee monitors' to consider developing their own prototypes or useful "bee holders". 

            As more local/regional bee field guides (physical and online) are created, tools like this may aid novice 'bee watchers', much like field guides and binoculars aided the popularity of birding.  Capture and release tools like this may provide all the level of taxonomic clarity novice bee watchers desire, as well as aid non-destructive citizen science projects.

            Thanks for reading
            Sincerely,

            Brian J. Dykstra
            Attachment(s) from Brian Dykstra
            1 of 1 Photo(s)
            --
            Bees are Not Optional
            Ong là không bắt buộc




            T'ai Roulston
            Curator, State Arboretum of Virginia
            Research Assoc. Prof., Dept of Envi. Sci.
            University of Virginia




          • Charles Guevara
            T ai...I felt bad it didn t work for you.  Today at 12:15 noon, sunny day, 64 degrees F, I took an apple slice from an apple sitting in my fridge for about a
            Message 5 of 5 , Sep 8, 2013
            View Source
            T'ai...I felt bad it didn't work for you.  Today at 12:15 noon, sunny day, 64 degrees F, I took an apple slice from an apple sitting in my fridge for about a week ( so this not plucked from the tree as I usually do.). So this was a non-fresh...and fridge cold apple slice.
             
               Here in central-fingerlakes/NY, the golden rod has been in full bloom for weeks, and we have had a lot of rain.
             
            I gently tapped three bumblebees into the plastic jar with apple slice.  Total sedation in 10 minutes.  As' the bee on slice 'shows..another species of flying insect is also sedated.  The bumblebee on golden rod was taken two days ago as I walked the dogs.
             
            The plastic jars contained instant coffee, I've washed them out well, and use them for months collecting water sample for microscopy.
             
            the jars are: 2 1/2X 2 1/2 X 6 inches.  I'm sorry the apples do not work where you are.  BTW...I never tried it with wasps.
             
               I,m now keen on why apple slices have not worked for you...did you give it 10 minutes?  would you like me to mail you a plactic bottle and two of my orchards apples?   all the best, charlie guevara

            From: T'ai Roulston <thr8z@...>
            To: "Lary, Sandra" <Sandra_Lary@...>
            Cc: Charles Guevara <icecilliate123@...>; "beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com" <beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com>
            Sent: Wednesday, September 4, 2013 10:41 AM
            Subject: Re: [beemonitoring] Photographing bees & no-kill identification tools
            I didn't have any luck with the apple slice in a jar and a bumble bee. The bumble bee was still quite active after half an hour. I used a glass jar rather than plastic and the jar was pint sized. Presumably the mode of action would be CO2 production from the sliced apple, as CO2 is well known to knock out bees. Perhaps my jar was too big.

            Karen Goodell's lab has a nice YouTube video that includes knocking out bees for identification using a compressed gas duster can, like those for cleaning computer keyboards.


            T'ai
            On Sep 4, 2013, at 9:40 AM, Lary, Sandra wrote:
             

            Great, creative suggestions Brian and Charlie, I am very interested in learning about any additional no-kill ID tools that people are using - - if anyone has more please forward.

            Thank you!
            Sandra

            ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
            Sandra J. Lary, Senior Fish & Wildlife Biologist
            U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service-Ecological Services
            Gulf of Maine Coastal Program
            4R Fundy Rd
            Falmouth, ME 04105
            207-781-8364, etx.19 
            On Wed, Aug 28, 2013 at 6:50 PM, Charles Guevara <icecilliate123@...> wrote:
             

              Hello all in forum, I need comments and opinion.  But first my suggestion of: fresh apple slice sedation for field image capture of bees and hornets...I never thought to try it with wasps...but it works even with huge 'European Hornets' in my central NY orchard.
             
               After the apple slice induced torpor...the bee can be manipulated for measurements, image capture...and I guess gentle marking/ swabbing for pollen or parasitic mites.
             
               This is a suggested field protocol for 'hands on/no kill identification'.  all the best, charlie guevara/fingerlakes,NY

            From: "Droege, Sam" <sdroege@...>
            To: Charles Guevara <icecilliate123@...>
            Sent: Wednesday, August 28, 2013 12:38 PM
            Subject: Re: Fw: [beemonitoring] Photographing bees & no kill identification - a tool
            Charlie...

            That is very cool.

            I will have to try.

            sam


            On Wed, Aug 28, 2013 at 12:34 PM, Charles Guevara <icecilliate123@...> wrote:
             

            ----- Forwarded Message -----
            From: Charles Guevara <icecilliate123@...>
            To: Brian Dykstra <brianjdykstra@...>
            Sent: Wednesday, August 28, 2013 12:33 PM
            Subject: Re: [beemonitoring] Photographing bees & no kill identification - a tool [1 Attachment]
               Hello, I notice in central NY, a simple fresh slice of apple ( I've used several varieties of apple)...placed in a plastic jar with good seal lid..somehow narcotizes /entrances bees and hornets of various sizes..right up to huge: 'European hornets'.
             
               After a few minutes you can gently slide the 'bee on apple' out of the container...place it on a white paper plate for good background...and image capture the nearly imobile organism.  The specimen recovers normal behavior after a short time.  I can post a few images to forum...as I do have questions about the large 'bees' that have attacked my fence poles, and my woodshed rafters.
             
               Please try fresh apple slice in tight seal plastic jar..it works in my orchard with all sorts of bees, hornets that I tried it with.  just a suggestion, charlie guevara

            From: Brian Dykstra <brianjdykstra@...>
            To: "beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com" <beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com>
            Sent: Tuesday, August 27, 2013 5:52 PM
            Subject: [beemonitoring] Photographing bees & no kill identification - a tool [1 Attachment]
            [Attachment(s) from Brian Dykstra included below]
            Dear all,

            I wanted to catch, photograph, and release bees, wasps and other insects for identification, after net capture in the field.  I had help from a colleague in creating a plexiglass container with a slide top and a foam plunger.  What we created is similar to the queen marking cage & plunger used by some in honey bee keeping practices, except our has a square shape and a glass top for ease in quality photography without distortion.  We made an optional screen slide for the top to for collecting pollen with toothpicks.    

            I am finding this small hand held device useful for identifying some Hymenoptera in a nearby field.  Attached here is a collage of some recent photos of the device in use.  I encourage 'bee monitors' to consider developing their own prototypes or useful "bee holders". 

            As more local/regional bee field guides (physical and online) are created, tools like this may aid novice 'bee watchers', much like field guides and binoculars aided the popularity of birding.  Capture and release tools like this may provide all the level of taxonomic clarity novice bee watchers desire, as well as aid non-destructive citizen science projects.

            Thanks for reading
            Sincerely,

            Brian J. Dykstra
            Attachment(s) from Brian Dykstra
            1 of 1 Photo(s)
            --
            Bees are Not Optional
            Ong là không bắt buộc


            T'ai Roulston
            Curator, State Arboretum of Virginia
            Research Assoc. Prof., Dept of Envi. Sci.
            University of Virginia
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