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exotic plants/bees

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  • Riddle,T Charles
    I have been looking at bees on crape myrtle which is widely planted and may be seen as invasive by some. I have collected a surprising diversity of bees from
    Message 1 of 2 , Aug 9, 2013
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      I have been looking at bees on crape myrtle which is widely planted and may be seen as invasive by some. I have collected a surprising diversity of bees from certain cultivars. My thinking is if the bee uses crape myrtle the bee probably is generalist enough to have some value as a crop pollinator. Further, you can review the known flower records for the animal and see where the potential lies. Many of the “bad” invasives which take over  seem to be wind pollinated. Many are in the nursery trade and I do not see any bee pollinators on them. At the least I would like to see plants used which support pollinators. There should be some ecological criteria for landscape plants and support of bee pollinators seems to be a good place to start.

       

      However, if a good bee pollinator for a plant like crape myrtle (Megachile sculpturalis?)  were introduced the plant could become much more invasive.

       

      The work of people like Sam Droege to me is much underappreciated because a historical record has got to be compiled. Otherwise, changes cannot be documented whether they are caused by pesticide misuse, spread of invasives/exotics or whatever.

       

      T. Charles Riddle

      Biologist

      University of Florida

      Nfrec Quincy

       

    • MICHAEL RIISAGER
      Sam Droege is truly an un(der)sung hero! I attended a workshop run by him in Baltimore in 2011, introducing members of the MD Natural History Society to the
      Message 2 of 2 , Aug 9, 2013
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        Sam Droege is truly an un(der)sung hero!  I attended a workshop run by him in Baltimore in 2011, introducing members of the MD Natural History Society to the elements of identifying native bee genera. Clear, concise, accurate and modest, Sam sparked a new interest in me - native bees. Sam also has collated all sorts of documentary support and bibliography.
         
        Thanks for mentioning him! Incidentally, I resonate with the opinions expressed.
         
        Michael Riisager 
         

        To: beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com
        From: tcri@...
        Date: Fri, 9 Aug 2013 20:15:42 +0000
        Subject: [beemonitoring] exotic plants/bees

         

        I have been looking at bees on crape myrtle which is widely planted and may be seen as invasive by some. I have collected a surprising diversity of bees from certain cultivars. My thinking is if the bee uses crape myrtle the bee probably is generalist enough to have some value as a crop pollinator. Further, you can review the known flower records for the animal and see where the potential lies. Many of the “bad” invasives which take over  seem to be wind pollinated. Many are in the nursery trade and I do not see any bee pollinators on them. At the least I would like to see plants used which support pollinators. There should be some ecological criteria for landscape plants and support of bee pollinators seems to be a good place to start.

         

        However, if a good bee pollinator for a plant like crape myrtle (Megachile sculpturalis?)  were introduced the plant could become much more invasive.

         

        The work of people like Sam Droege to me is much underappreciated because a historical record has got to be compiled. Otherwise, changes cannot be documented whether they are caused by pesticide misuse, spread of invasives/exotics or whatever.

         

        T. Charles Riddle

        Biologist

        University of Florida

        Nfrec Quincy

         


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