Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Book Recommendation?

Expand Messages
  • Julie Tennis
    Greetings all! :) I would like to get a key for identifying native bees of western North America. Do you have any suggestions? Thank you, *Julie Tennis*
    Message 1 of 6 , Jul 30, 2013
    • 0 Attachment
      Greetings all!  :)

      I would like to get a key for identifying native bees of western North America.  Do you have any suggestions?

      Thank you,

      Julie Tennis
      Writer, Educator, Beekeeper

      julietennis@...
    • Brian Dykstra
      Julie, This is one easy to access resource: The Biology and External Morphology of Bees with a Synopsis of the Genera of Northwestern. America . 1969. by W.
      Message 2 of 6 , Jul 30, 2013
      • 0 Attachment
        Julie,
        This is one easy to access resource: 'The Biology and External Morphology of Bees with a Synopsis of the Genera of Northwestern. America'. 1969. by W. P. Stephen; G. E. Bohart; P. F. Torchio. The book can be downloaded or read on line here:
        http://scholarsarchive.library.oregonstate.edu/xmlui/bitstream/handle/1957/2080/THEBIOLOGYANDEXTERNALM.pdf
        By the way, I like your BeeMentor.com site.
        Take care,
      • Jack Neff
        Julie:  Sorry to disappoint you but no such book exists, at least if you want to take things to the species level.  For some groups like Andrena, Anthophora
        Message 3 of 6 , Jul 30, 2013
        • 0 Attachment
          Julie:  Sorry to disappoint you but no such book exists, at least if you want to take things to the species level.  For some groups like Andrena, Anthophora etc. you can try your luck with the Discover Life Keys.  If you live in California some of the older publications of the California Insect Survey can be very helpful for a few groups, particularly megachilids.  For others you'll need to go the primary literature (the various revisions of the panurgines, eucerines, hylaeines and so forth.  For a few big groups (Dialictus, Nomada, Epeolus) you're basically out of luck for now as the western species of these groups have not been revised.  Michener (2007) "The Bees of the World"  is an excellent treatment which includes keys to virtually all the genera and subgenera of bees of the world, but can be a bit challenging for the novice.  It also includes many references to the primary literature.   Unfortunately parts are already out of date in this fast moving field.

          best

          Jack


          John L. Neff
          Central Texas Melittological Institute
          7307 Running Rope
          Austin,TX 78731 USA
          512-345-7219


          From: Julie Tennis <julietennis@...>
          To: beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Tuesday, July 30, 2013 12:40 PM
          Subject: [beemonitoring] Book Recommendation?

           
          Greetings all!  :)

          I would like to get a key for identifying native bees of western North America.  Do you have any suggestions?

          Thank you,

          Julie Tennis
          Writer, Educator, Beekeeper

          julietennis@...


        • Jack Neff
          Stephen et al (1969) is an excellent introduction to biology of western US bees but the systematics are antediluvian. best Jack   John L. Neff Central Texas
          Message 4 of 6 , Jul 30, 2013
          • 0 Attachment
            Stephen et al (1969) is an excellent introduction to biology of western US bees but the systematics are antediluvian.

            best

            Jack
             
            John L. Neff
            Central Texas Melittological Institute
            7307 Running Rope
            Austin,TX 78731 USA
            512-345-7219


            From: Brian Dykstra <brianjdykstra@...>
            To: Julie Tennis <julietennis@...>
            Cc: "beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com" <beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com>
            Sent: Tuesday, July 30, 2013 2:13 PM
            Subject: Re: [beemonitoring] Book Recommendation?

             
            Julie,
            This is one easy to access resource: 'The Biology and External Morphology of Bees with a Synopsis of the Genera of Northwestern. America'. 1969. by W. P. Stephen; G. E. Bohart; P. F. Torchio. The book can be downloaded or read on line here:
            http://scholarsarchive.library.oregonstate.edu/xmlui/bitstream/handle/1957/2080/THEBIOLOGYANDEXTERNALM.pdf
            By the way, I like your BeeMentor.com site.
            Take care,


          • Rob Irwin
            I ve been trying to identify native California bees for a while, and also Stephen et al (1969) to be incredibly useful when starting out. And although the
            Message 5 of 6 , Aug 4, 2013
            I've been trying to identify native California bees for a while, and
            also Stephen et al (1969) to be incredibly useful when starting out.

            And although the systematics are antediluvian, you can find the modern
            names with some elbow grease. I checked each family, subfamily, and
            genus presented on page 32 against the Hymenopteran Name Server
            (http://osuc.biosci.ohio-state.edu/ ). Attached is a scan of my
            chicken scratch reconciling the systematics on page 32 with the modern
            names.

            So, if you run through the keys in Stephen et al., you need to check the
            genus against the fixed systematics, or just enter it into the
            Hymenopteran Name Server and find out what its modern name is.

            Once you get familiar with Stephen et al's keys, its not such a big leap
            to try the DiscoverLife.org bee keys.

            Rob Irwin
          • Jack Neff
            I was probably being overly harsh on Stephen et al.  Its a good key for the genera of bees of the Northwestern America (at least if one updates the
            Message 6 of 6 , Aug 5, 2013
            • 0 Attachment
              I was probably being overly harsh on Stephen et al.  Its a good key for the genera of bees of the Northwestern America (at least if one updates the systematics).  However, for me, identifying bees is taking them to species and as yet there is no western equivalent of Mitchell.  One certainly has to be able to get things to genus first, but in a group like the bees where many of the genera are gigantic, genus-level ids are only a baby step. 

              best

              Jack
               
              John L. Neff
              Central Texas Melittological Institute
              7307 Running Rope
              Austin,TX 78731 USA
              512-345-7219


              From: Rob Irwin <robsbugs@...>
              To: beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Sunday, August 4, 2013 4:07 PM
              Subject: [beemonitoring] Re: Book Recommendation? [1 Attachment]

               
              I've been trying to identify native California bees for a while, and
              also Stephen et al (1969) to be incredibly useful when starting out.

              And although the systematics are antediluvian, you can find the modern
              names with some elbow grease. I checked each family, subfamily, and
              genus presented on page 32 against the Hymenopteran Name Server
              (http://osuc.biosci.ohio-state.edu/ ). Attached is a scan of my
              chicken scratch reconciling the systematics on page 32 with the modern
              names.

              So, if you run through the keys in Stephen et al., you need to check the
              genus against the fixed systematics, or just enter it into the
              Hymenopteran Name Server and find out what its modern name is.

              Once you get familiar with Stephen et al's keys, its not such a big leap
              to try the DiscoverLife.org bee keys.

              Rob Irwin



            Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.