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Intact large paper hive 'post mortem' possible? please advise?

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  • Charles
    Hello all, In my central NY (finger lakes region) I had a large paper hive hive in my unheated barn wood shed. This paper elliptical-tea drop shaped hive had
    Message 1 of 6 , Jun 29, 2013
    • 0 Attachment
      Hello all, In my central NY (finger lakes region) I had a large paper hive hive in my unheated barn wood shed. This paper elliptical-tea drop shaped hive had no exits to the interior of my high ceiling shed, but a very active entrance/exit area papered on the exterior of the wood planks. I have images of this approximately 2' paper globe.

      I had great plans for that colony of 'native bees which greatly resembled honey bees to my eye as they entered and exited that nest 12 feet above ground level. I have images of these bees. I was thinking about sectioning trivial areas of that paper hive..and adding various paper replacements...and synthetic fiber replacements...I wanted to see if the structure would be actively maintained if I induced those changes.

      After Spring'13..it became obvious this hive is now a 'dead' non inhabited structure.

      My questions and request for coments:

      1) If I carefully take down this structure...can I find suggestions of what happened that this colony never made it through the winter? By now would dead inhabitants have all been 'recycled' by molds or ants, or what? Will I possibly find a totally unpopulated structure or do other insects move into such a structure?

      2) Should I carefully place this entity in a screen support and hang it outside my shed at a similar height...would birds, of other types of bees make use of it?

      3) Is this failed hive to be considered a potential contaigeon to the myriad of pollinators which service my orchard and berries, and flowers?

      4) Is this 2' hive with a predictable internal architecture ..are the component functional areas of a hive similar for hives of a given species?

      I am getting carried away with this. J.Scott Turners concepts of: 'the extended organism/ the physiology of animal built structures', had me wanting to induce those alterations to this hive...had it made it through the winter.

      Plenty of wasps and hornets and yellow-jackets still utilize my large shed. I hope all are doing well this summer season. charlie guevara
    • Matthias Buck
      Hi Charles, What you found in your barn is a yellowjacket nest. They are wasps but similar to bumble bees their colonies only last for a season, and their
      Message 2 of 6 , Jun 29, 2013
      • 0 Attachment
        Hi Charles,

        What you found in your barn is a yellowjacket nest. They are wasps but similar to bumble bees their colonies only last for a season, and their nests are never occupied again. No worries about diseases.

        I hope this helps,

                         Matthias


        On Sat, Jun 29, 2013 at 10:34 AM, Charles <icecilliate123@...> wrote:
         

        Hello all, In my central NY (finger lakes region) I had a large paper hive hive in my unheated barn wood shed. This paper elliptical-tea drop shaped hive had no exits to the interior of my high ceiling shed, but a very active entrance/exit area papered on the exterior of the wood planks. I have images of this approximately 2' paper globe.

        I had great plans for that colony of 'native bees which greatly resembled honey bees to my eye as they entered and exited that nest 12 feet above ground level. I have images of these bees. I was thinking about sectioning trivial areas of that paper hive..and adding various paper replacements...and synthetic fiber replacements...I wanted to see if the structure would be actively maintained if I induced those changes.

        After Spring'13..it became obvious this hive is now a 'dead' non inhabited structure.

        My questions and request for coments:

        1) If I carefully take down this structure...can I find suggestions of what happened that this colony never made it through the winter? By now would dead inhabitants have all been 'recycled' by molds or ants, or what? Will I possibly find a totally unpopulated structure or do other insects move into such a structure?

        2) Should I carefully place this entity in a screen support and hang it outside my shed at a similar height...would birds, of other types of bees make use of it?

        3) Is this failed hive to be considered a potential contaigeon to the myriad of pollinators which service my orchard and berries, and flowers?

        4) Is this 2' hive with a predictable internal architecture ..are the component functional areas of a hive similar for hives of a given species?

        I am getting carried away with this. J.Scott Turners concepts of: 'the extended organism/ the physiology of animal built structures', had me wanting to induce those alterations to this hive...had it made it through the winter.

        Plenty of wasps and hornets and yellow-jackets still utilize my large shed. I hope all are doing well this summer season. charlie guevara




        --
        Dr. Matthias Buck
        Invertebrate Zoology
        Royal Alberta Museum
        12845-102nd Avenue
        Edmonton, Alberta
        Canada, T5N 0M6
        Phone: (780) 453-9122
        www.royalalbertamuseum.ca
      • Charles Guevara
           Thanks for the education, Matthias.  Odd how I sense the bees I observed did not look like yellow jackets to me..and I certainly have encounters with
        Message 3 of 6 , Jun 29, 2013
        • 0 Attachment
             Thanks for the education, Matthias.  Odd how I sense the bees I observed did not look like yellow jackets to me..and I certainly have encounters with yellow-jackets.  I'll have to look at the images I captured last year.  all the best, charlie guevara

          From: Matthias Buck <buckmb@...>
          To: Charles <icecilliate123@...>
          Cc: "beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com" <beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com>
          Sent: Saturday, June 29, 2013 12:49 PM
          Subject: Re: [beemonitoring] Intact large paper hive 'post mortem' possible? please advise?



          Hi Charles,

          What you found in your barn is a yellowjacket nest. They are wasps but similar to bumble bees their colonies only last for a season, and their nests are never occupied again. No worries about diseases.

          I hope this helps,

                           Matthias


          On Sat, Jun 29, 2013 at 10:34 AM, Charles <icecilliate123@...> wrote:
           
          Hello all, In my central NY (finger lakes region) I had a large paper hive hive in my unheated barn wood shed. This paper elliptical-tea drop shaped hive had no exits to the interior of my high ceiling shed, but a very active entrance/exit area papered on the exterior of the wood planks. I have images of this approximately 2' paper globe.

          I had great plans for that colony of 'native bees which greatly resembled honey bees to my eye as they entered and exited that nest 12 feet above ground level. I have images of these bees. I was thinking about sectioning trivial areas of that paper hive..and adding various paper replacements...and synthetic fiber replacements...I wanted to see if the structure would be actively maintained if I induced those changes.

          After Spring'13..it became obvious this hive is now a 'dead' non inhabited structure.

          My questions and request for coments:

          1) If I carefully take down this structure...can I find suggestions of what happened that this colony never made it through the winter? By now would dead inhabitants have all been 'recycled' by molds or ants, or what? Will I possibly find a totally unpopulated structure or do other insects move into such a structure?

          2) Should I carefully place this entity in a screen support and hang it outside my shed at a similar height...would birds, of other types of bees make use of it?

          3) Is this failed hive to be considered a potential contaigeon to the myriad of pollinators which service my orchard and berries, and flowers?

          4) Is this 2' hive with a predictable internal architecture ..are the component functional areas of a hive similar for hives of a given species?

          I am getting carried away with this. J.Scott Turners concepts of: 'the extended organism/ the physiology of animal built structures', had me wanting to induce those alterations to this hive...had it made it through the winter.

          Plenty of wasps and hornets and yellow-jackets still utilize my large shed. I hope all are doing well this summer season. charlie guevara




          --
          Dr. Matthias Buck
          Invertebrate Zoology
          Royal Alberta Museum
          12845-102nd Avenue
          Edmonton, Alberta
          Canada, T5N 0M6
          Phone: (780) 453-9122
          http://www.royalalbertamuseum.ca/




        • Pehling, David J
          Remember that there are MANY yellowjacket species in N.A. with various coloration. From the size of your nest, if it were in WA. state, I would most suspect
          Message 4 of 6 , Jun 30, 2013
          • 0 Attachment
            Remember that there are MANY yellowjacket species in N.A. with various coloration.  From the size of your nest, if it were in WA. state, I would most suspect Dolichovespula maculata, a large black and white "yellowjacket".

            Dane Pehling
            WSU Extension Snohomish County

            Sent from my iPad

            On Jun 29, 2013, at 10:00 AM, "Charles Guevara" <icecilliate123@...> wrote:

             

               Thanks for the education, Matthias.  Odd how I sense the bees I observed did not look like yellow jackets to me..and I certainly have encounters with yellow-jackets.  I'll have to look at the images I captured last year.  all the best, charlie guevara

            From: Matthias Buck <buckmb@...>
            To: Charles <icecilliate123@...>
            Cc: "beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com" <beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com>
            Sent: Saturday, June 29, 2013 12:49 PM
            Subject: Re: [beemonitoring] Intact large paper hive 'post mortem' possible? please advise?



            Hi Charles,

            What you found in your barn is a yellowjacket nest. They are wasps but similar to bumble bees their colonies only last for a season, and their nests are never occupied again. No worries about diseases.

            I hope this helps,

                             Matthias


            On Sat, Jun 29, 2013 at 10:34 AM, Charles <icecilliate123@...> wrote:
             
            Hello all, In my central NY (finger lakes region) I had a large paper hive hive in my unheated barn wood shed. This paper elliptical-tea drop shaped hive had no exits to the interior of my high ceiling shed, but a very active entrance/exit area papered on the exterior of the wood planks. I have images of this approximately 2' paper globe.

            I had great plans for that colony of 'native bees which greatly resembled honey bees to my eye as they entered and exited that nest 12 feet above ground level. I have images of these bees. I was thinking about sectioning trivial areas of that paper hive..and adding various paper replacements...and synthetic fiber replacements...I wanted to see if the structure would be actively maintained if I induced those changes.

            After Spring'13..it became obvious this hive is now a 'dead' non inhabited structure.

            My questions and request for coments:

            1) If I carefully take down this structure...can I find suggestions of what happened that this colony never made it through the winter? By now would dead inhabitants have all been 'recycled' by molds or ants, or what? Will I possibly find a totally unpopulated structure or do other insects move into such a structure?

            2) Should I carefully place this entity in a screen support and hang it outside my shed at a similar height...would birds, of other types of bees make use of it?

            3) Is this failed hive to be considered a potential contaigeon to the myriad of pollinators which service my orchard and berries, and flowers?

            4) Is this 2' hive with a predictable internal architecture ..are the component functional areas of a hive similar for hives of a given species?

            I am getting carried away with this. J.Scott Turners concepts of: 'the extended organism/ the physiology of animal built structures', had me wanting to induce those alterations to this hive...had it made it through the winter.

            Plenty of wasps and hornets and yellow-jackets still utilize my large shed. I hope all are doing well this summer season. charlie guevara




            --
            Dr. Matthias Buck
            Invertebrate Zoology
            Royal Alberta Museum
            12845-102nd Avenue
            Edmonton, Alberta
            Canada, T5N 0M6
            Phone: (780) 453-9122
            http://www.royalalbertamuseum.ca/




          • Charles Guevara
               I m appreciative of Matthias , and your prompt replies and education for me...thanks, David!   charlie guevara ________________________________ From:
            Message 5 of 6 , Jun 30, 2013
               I'm appreciative of Matthias , and your prompt replies and education for me...thanks, David!   charlie guevara

            From: "Pehling, David J" <pehling@...>
            To: Charles Guevara <icecilliate123@...>
            Cc: Matthias Buck <buckmb@...>; "beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com" <beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com>
            Sent: Sunday, June 30, 2013 11:06 AM
            Subject: Re: [beemonitoring] Intact large paper hive 'post mortem' possible? please advise?
            Remember that there are MANY yellowjacket species in N.A. with various coloration.  From the size of your nest, if it were in WA. state, I would most suspect Dolichovespula maculata, a large black and white "yellowjacket".

            Dane Pehling
            WSU Extension Snohomish County
            Sent from my iPad
            On Jun 29, 2013, at 10:00 AM, "Charles Guevara" <icecilliate123@...> wrote:
             
               Thanks for the education, Matthias.  Odd how I sense the bees I observed did not look like yellow jackets to me..and I certainly have encounters with yellow-jackets.  I'll have to look at the images I captured last year.  all the best, charlie guevara

            From: Matthias Buck <buckmb@...>
            To: Charles <icecilliate123@...>
            Cc: "beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com" <beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com>
            Sent: Saturday, June 29, 2013 12:49 PM
            Subject: Re: [beemonitoring] Intact large paper hive 'post mortem' possible? please advise?

            Hi Charles,
            What you found in your barn is a yellowjacket nest. They are wasps but similar to bumble bees their colonies only last for a season, and their nests are never occupied again. No worries about diseases.
            I hope this helps,
                             Matthias
            On Sat, Jun 29, 2013 at 10:34 AM, Charles <icecilliate123@...> wrote:
             
            Hello all, In my central NY (finger lakes region) I had a large paper hive hive in my unheated barn wood shed. This paper elliptical-tea drop shaped hive had no exits to the interior of my high ceiling shed, but a very active entrance/exit area papered on the exterior of the wood planks. I have images of this approximately 2' paper globe. I had great plans for that colony of 'native bees which greatly resembled honey bees to my eye as they entered and exited that nest 12 feet above ground level. I have images of these bees. I was thinking about sectioning trivial areas of that paper hive..and adding various paper replacements...and synthetic fiber replacements...I wanted to see if the structure would be actively maintained if I induced those changes. After Spring'13..it became obvious this hive is now a 'dead' non inhabited structure. My questions and request for coments: 1) If I carefully take down this structure...can I find suggestions of what happened that this colony never made it through the winter? By now would dead inhabitants have all been 'recycled' by molds or ants, or what? Will I possibly find a totally unpopulated structure or do other insects move into such a structure? 2) Should I carefully place this entity in a screen support and hang it outside my shed at a similar height...would birds, of other types of bees make use of it? 3) Is this failed hive to be considered a potential contaigeon to the myriad of pollinators which service my orchard and berries, and flowers? 4) Is this 2' hive with a predictable internal architecture ..are the component functional areas of a hive similar for hives of a given species? I am getting carried away with this. J.Scott Turners concepts of: 'the extended organism/ the physiology of animal built structures', had me wanting to induce those alterations to this hive...had it made it through the winter. Plenty of wasps and hornets and yellow-jackets still utilize my large shed. I hope all are doing well this summer season. charlie guevara
            -- Dr. Matthias Buck Invertebrate Zoology Royal Alberta Museum 12845-102nd Avenue Edmonton, Alberta Canada, T5N 0M6 Phone: (780) 453-9122 http://www.royalalbertamuseum.ca/
          • Charles Guevara
            Opps on second image. ________________________________ From: Charles Guevara To: Pehling, David J Cc: Matthias
            Message 6 of 6 , Jun 30, 2013
            • 1 Attachment
            • 837 KB
            Opps on second image.

            From: Charles Guevara <icecilliate123@...>
            To: "Pehling, David J" <pehling@...>
            Cc: Matthias Buck <buckmb@...>; "beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com" <beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com>
            Sent: Sunday, June 30, 2013 12:16 PM
            Subject: Re: [beemonitoring] Intact large paper hive 'post mortem' possible? please advise? [1 Attachment]

            [Attachment(s) from Charles Guevara included below]

               I'm appreciative of Matthias , and your prompt replies and education for me...thanks, David!   charlie guevara

            From: "Pehling, David J" <pehling@...>
            To: Charles Guevara <icecilliate123@...>
            Cc: Matthias Buck <buckmb@...>; "beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com" <beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com>
            Sent: Sunday, June 30, 2013 11:06 AM
            Subject: Re: [beemonitoring] Intact large paper hive 'post mortem' possible? please advise?
            Remember that there are MANY yellowjacket species in N.A. with various coloration.  From the size of your nest, if it were in WA. state, I would most suspect Dolichovespula maculata, a large black and white "yellowjacket".

            Dane Pehling
            WSU Extension Snohomish County
            Sent from my iPad
            On Jun 29, 2013, at 10:00 AM, "Charles Guevara" <icecilliate123@...> wrote:
             
               Thanks for the education, Matthias.  Odd how I sense the bees I observed did not look like yellow jackets to me..and I certainly have encounters with yellow-jackets.  I'll have to look at the images I captured last year.  all the best, charlie guevara

            From: Matthias Buck <buckmb@...>
            To: Charles <icecilliate123@...>
            Cc: "beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com" <beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com>
            Sent: Saturday, June 29, 2013 12:49 PM
            Subject: Re: [beemonitoring] Intact large paper hive 'post mortem' possible? please advise?

            Hi Charles,
            What you found in your barn is a yellowjacket nest. They are wasps but similar to bumble bees their colonies only last for a season, and their nests are never occupied again. No worries about diseases.
            I hope this helps,
                             Matthias
            On Sat, Jun 29, 2013 at 10:34 AM, Charles <icecilliate123@...> wrote:
             
            Hello all, In my central NY (finger lakes region) I had a large paper hive hive in my unheated barn wood shed. This paper elliptical-tea drop shaped hive had no exits to the interior of my high ceiling shed, but a very active entrance/exit area papered on the exterior of the wood planks. I have images of this approximately 2' paper globe. I had great plans for that colony of 'native bees which greatly resembled honey bees to my eye as they entered and exited that nest 12 feet above ground level. I have images of these bees. I was thinking about sectioning trivial areas of that paper hive..and adding various paper replacements...and synthetic fiber replacements...I wanted to see if the structure would be actively maintained if I induced those changes. After Spring'13..it became obvious this hive is now a 'dead' non inhabited structure. My questions and request for coments: 1) If I carefully take down this structure...can I find suggestions of what happened that this colony never made it through the winter? By now would dead inhabitants have all been 'recycled' by molds or ants, or what? Will I possibly find a totally unpopulated structure or do other insects move into such a structure? 2) Should I carefully place this entity in a screen support and hang it outside my shed at a similar height...would birds, of other types of bees make use of it? 3) Is this failed hive to be considered a potential contaigeon to the myriad of pollinators which service my orchard and berries, and flowers? 4) Is this 2' hive with a predictable internal architecture ..are the component functional areas of a hive similar for hives of a given species? I am getting carried away with this. J.Scott Turners concepts of: 'the extended organism/ the physiology of animal built structures', had me wanting to induce those alterations to this hive...had it made it through the winter. Plenty of wasps and hornets and yellow-jackets still utilize my large shed. I hope all are doing well this summer season. charlie guevara
            -- Dr. Matthias Buck Invertebrate Zoology Royal Alberta Museum 12845-102nd Avenue Edmonton, Alberta Canada, T5N 0M6 Phone: (780) 453-9122 http://www.royalalbertamuseum.ca/

            Attachment(s) from Charles Guevara
            1 of 1 Photo(s)


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