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Re: Elementary, my dear Watson.

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  • Eli Wyman
    What s EXTRA funny is that the props department guys came to us (Jerry Rozen, John Ascher, and myself) at the AMNH and asked us (mainly Jerry) for advice and
    Message 1 of 4 , May 20 5:12 PM
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      What's EXTRA funny is that the props department guys came to us (Jerry Rozen, John Ascher, and myself) at the AMNH and asked us (mainly Jerry) for advice and talked about how they prided themselves on being as scientifically accurate as possible. They had somehow heard about Jerry's work on the nests of Osmia avosetta and wanted to use that species in an upcoming episode. They borrowed a pinned specimen, but wanted to use a live one (a bit tough since they live in Turkey). I suggested that they try ordering some Osmia cornifrons, which I'm guessing they didn't do. All I can say is we gave them very sound and accurate information about bees and they apparently decided to ignore all of it. Can't wait to see this one!

      Eli
    • hadel go
      here s the dialogue if i heard correctly: Sherlock: You remember the rare bee I was given for proving that Jarold Lyden had been poisoned? Watson: The bee in
      Message 2 of 4 , May 20 6:05 PM
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        here's the dialogue if i heard correctly:

        Sherlock: You remember the rare bee I was given for proving that Jarold Lyden had been poisoned?
        Watson: The bee in the box sure...
        S: Osmia avosetta is its own species which means it should not be able to reproduce with other kinds of bees and yet nature is infinitely wily...
        W: So box bee got another bee pregnant?
        S: Quite so... which means they should be reclassified as an entirely new species, the first newborn of which is about to crawl its way to sunlight.
        **they show a short clip of this "new" bee emerging from a cell in Sherlock's observation hive, it looks like a honeybee drone.**
        W: Oh my god...
        S: As the discoverer of the species the privilege of naming the creatures fall to me.  Allow me to introduce you to Euglossa watsonii.
        W: You named a bee after me?  You named a bee after me!
        **another clip of a bee emerging, it looks like a honeybee worker.**
        S: There should be dozens more within the hour.  If you like I can come get you once they're all here.
        W: It's alright.  I think I'll just watch.
        **end of show**

        i cringed.  but at least O avosetta got mentioned in a prime time hit show...  right?
      • Brian Dykstra
        About the Sherlock Homes Bee(s): Anita, Eli and others, The show ending was far some scientifically accurate. This collage is not Osmia avosetta, but is a
        Message 3 of 4 , May 20 6:44 PM
        About the Sherlock Homes Bee(s):
        Anita, Eli and others, 
        The show ending was far some scientifically accurate.  This collage is not Osmia avosetta, but is a visual take on the shows science.  As I noted in my Ethnobeeology FB post, Sherlock Holmes has a long and varied history with beekeeping, which has been revived recently in books and now television.



        On Mon, May 20, 2013 at 3:30 AM, Anita M. Collins <frozenbeedoc@...> wrote:
         

         Did anyone catch last week's episode of Elementary?  At the end of the show, Sherlock is sitting on the roof contemplating two VERY tall observation hives.  Apis, I supposed.  However he revealed that he had crossed an Apis with an Osmia and gotten a hybrid Euglossinae which he was naming after Watson.   ;o)  LOL!
        Anita
         
        If we knew what we were doing, it wouldn't be called research.
        Albert Einstein


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