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Carpenter Bee Behavior Question

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  • Richard Orr
    I took this short video yesterday at Fort Frederick State Park in Maryland. Does anyone have a clue as to what is going on with these Large Carpenter Bees?
    Message 1 of 7 , May 18, 2013
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      I took this short video yesterday at Fort Frederick State Park in Maryland.

      Does anyone have a clue as to what is going on with these Large Carpenter Bees?

       

      http://www.flickr.com/photos/dragonflyhunter/8749419363/in/photostream

       

      Be sure to view at full screen and in HD.

       

      Thanks,

       

       

      Richard Orr

      www.marylandinsects.com

      www.flickr.com/photos/dragonflyhunter/

       

       

    • Edward Barrows
      It looks like about 5 female and 2 male Xylocopa virginica virginica. Hypothesis: Females were feeding on the goose dropping, possibly obtaining salt. Two
      Message 2 of 7 , May 18, 2013
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        It looks like about 5 female and 2 male Xylocopa virginica virginica.   Hypothesis: Females were feeding on the goose dropping, possibly obtaining salt.  Two males hovered over the females, contacting females and each other.  The small be is a male of unknown species which chased a male XVV.  The bees concentrated in the area because food, and likely other bees, attracted them.  Other hypotheses, anyone?  Edd Barrows



        On Sat, May 18, 2013 at 8:12 AM, Richard Orr <odonata457@...> wrote:


        I took this short video yesterday at Fort Frederick State Park in Maryland.

        Does anyone have a clue as to what is going on with these Large Carpenter Bees?

         

        http://www.flickr.com/photos/dragonflyhunter/8749419363/in/photostream

         

        Be sure to view at full screen and in HD.

         

        Thanks,

         

         

        Richard Orr

        www.marylandinsects.com

        www.flickr.com/photos/dragonflyhunter/

         

         




      • Charles Guevara
           Bravo to bee attraction to salts...I sense this the terrific factor . For years my son and I  have noted the simple spring-summer (we never tried it in
        Message 3 of 7 , Jul 27, 2013
           Bravo to bee attraction to salts...I sense this the terrific factor . For years my son and I  have noted the simple spring-summer (we never tried it in the fall season) attraction  of varieties of bee species to human urine on tree stumps.  Sorry if this offends forum sensibilities...but a darn 'quick and easy' means to observe a meadows bee species mix...is to observe a tree stump or rock which has been 'treated with an application' of this body fluid.  I have seen ove six types of bees all at the same time landed and enthralled by this circumstance here in central NY.
         
           It would be quite intresting (sorry to press on with this subject...but I.m sincere) to compare this 'protocol' to other 'survey trap protocols' in the same meadow or orchard.  I hope my two images reach the forum.  all the best, charlie guevara

        From: Edward Barrows <barrowse@...>
        To: Richard Orr <odonata457@...>
        Cc: beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com; Edward Barrows <barrowse@...>
        Sent: Saturday, May 18, 2013 5:20 PM
        Subject: Re: [beemonitoring] Carpenter Bee Behavior Question



        It looks like about 5 female and 2 male Xylocopa virginica virginica.   Hypothesis: Females were feeding on the goose dropping, possibly obtaining salt.  Two males hovered over the females, contacting females and each other.  The small be is a male of unknown species which chased a male XVV.  The bees concentrated in the area because food, and likely other bees, attracted them.  Other hypotheses, anyone?  Edd Barrows



        On Sat, May 18, 2013 at 8:12 AM, Richard Orr <odonata457@...> wrote:


        I took this short video yesterday at Fort Frederick State Park in Maryland.
        Does anyone have a clue as to what is going on with these Large Carpenter Bees?
         
         
        Be sure to view at full screen and in HD.
         
        Thanks,
         
         
        Richard Orr
         
         







      • Frye, Jennifer
        Hi all, I have been looking into the potential impacts of mosquito control larvicides to non-target organisms, including native bees (not honeybees). I have
        Message 4 of 7 , Nov 4, 2013
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          Hi all,

           

          I have been looking into the potential impacts of mosquito control larvicides to non-target organisms, including native bees (not honeybees).  I have heard it argued that because mosquito control activities are usually conducted at night (or at least at dusk), that the risk to bees is reduced because they are no longer foraging at that time.  The counter argument is that native bees may still be exposed to chemicals because they often spend the night at rest on flowers or plants.  I have seen Bombus males perched on flowers after dusk, and I can envision that male bees of solitary species do the same thing.  My question is do females do this as well?  Do solitary female bees that are actively laying eggs and provisioning their nests, tunnels, etc. with food resources also spend the evenings perched on vegetation, or are they more likely to be hanging out in their tunnels, tree cavities, or other nesting places? If anyone has observations or data on this topic, or any papers that address this issue that they could share, I would be very appreciative.

           

          Thanks very much for your help!

           

          Sincerely,

          Jen Frye

           

          Jennifer Frye

          Invertebrate Ecologist

          Wildlife and Heritage Service

          Maryland Department of Natural Resources

          P.O. Box 68

          909 Wye Mills Road

          Wye Mills , MD 21679

          Office: 410-827-8612 x102

          E-mail: jfrye@...

           

        • Odo Natasaki
          Jen, From my observations on the popular bees that go to provided cavity nest boxes, the females are always observed in their channels each night and through
          Message 5 of 7 , Nov 4, 2013
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            Jen,

            From my observations on the "popular" bees that go to provided cavity nest
            boxes, the females are always observed in their channels each night and
            through incliment weather. This would include many species of Osmia,
            Anthidium, Megachile etc. I have pulled out very many see-through covered
            trays from my bee boxes for over 25 years, and the females are almost
            always there. If they have been preyed upon or if predators move into the
            provisioning such as ants, the females of course won't be there. It makes
            for good photography in the morning when it's still cold and they haven't
            left for foraging yet.

            Cheers,

            Gord Hutchings



            > Hi all,
            >
            > I have been looking into the potential impacts of mosquito control
            > larvicides to non-target organisms, including native bees (not honeybees).
            > I have heard it argued that because mosquito control activities are
            > usually conducted at night (or at least at dusk), that the risk to bees is
            > reduced because they are no longer foraging at that time. The counter
            > argument is that native bees may still be exposed to chemicals because
            > they often spend the night at rest on flowers or plants. I have seen
            > Bombus males perched on flowers after dusk, and I can envision that male
            > bees of solitary species do the same thing. My question is do females do
            > this as well? Do solitary female bees that are actively laying eggs and
            > provisioning their nests, tunnels, etc. with food resources also spend the
            > evenings perched on vegetation, or are they more likely to be hanging out
            > in their tunnels, tree cavities, or other nesting places? If anyone has
            > observations or data on this topic, or any papers that address this issue
            > that they could share, I would be very appreciative.
            >
            > Thanks very much for your help!
            >
            > Sincerely,
            > Jen Frye
            >
            > Jennifer Frye
            > Invertebrate Ecologist
            > Wildlife and Heritage Service
            > Maryland Department of Natural Resources
            > P.O. Box 68
            > 909 Wye Mills Road
            > Wye Mills, MD 21679
            > Office: 410-827-8612 x102
            > E-mail: jfrye@...<mailto:jfrye@...>
            >
            >


            }\(-.-)/{
            https://sites.google.com/site/hutchingsbeeservice/announcement
          • Jack Neff
            Females of non-parasitic species usually spend their nights in their nests so exposure to short lived pesticides applied at night should be minimal.  The main
            Message 6 of 7 , Nov 4, 2013
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              Females of non-parasitic species usually spend their nights in their nests so exposure to short lived pesticides applied at night should be minimal.  The main exceptions would be the few nocturnal specie. Occasionally a late foraging diurnal female will be caught out after dark and will have to spend the night on a flower or grasping a stem but that is not common.  Parasitic females often do spend their nights in exposed places so they will be at risk.

              best

              Jack
               
              John L. Neff
              Central Texas Melittological Institute
              7307 Running Rope
              Austin,TX 78731 USA
              512-345-7219


              On Monday, November 4, 2013 2:21 PM, "Frye, Jennifer" <jfrye@...> wrote:
               
              Hi all,
               
              I have been looking into the potential impacts of mosquito control larvicides to non-target organisms, including native bees (not honeybees).  I have heard it argued that because mosquito control activities are usually conducted at night (or at least at dusk), that the risk to bees is reduced because they are no longer foraging at that time.  The counter argument is that native bees may still be exposed to chemicals because they often spend the night at rest on flowers or plants.  I have seen Bombus males perched on flowers after dusk, and I can envision that male bees of solitary species do the same thing.  My question is do females do this as well?  Do solitary female bees that are actively laying eggs and provisioning their nests, tunnels, etc. with food resources also spend the evenings perched on vegetation, or are they more likely to be hanging out in their tunnels, tree cavities, or other nesting places? If anyone has observations or data on this topic, or any papers that address this issue that they could share, I would be very appreciative.
               
              Thanks very much for your help!
               
              Sincerely,
              Jen Frye
               
              Jennifer Frye
              Invertebrate Ecologist
              Wildlife and Heritage Service
              Maryland Department of Natural Resources
              P.O. Box 68
              909 Wye Mills Road
              Wye Mills , MD 21679
              Office: 410-827-8612 x102
              E-mail: jfrye@...
               


            • Frye, Jennifer
              Thanks to all who responded to my question. In addition to the online responses to the listserv, I received a couple of additional emails. Another person
              Message 7 of 7 , Nov 5, 2013
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                Thanks to all who responded to my question.  In addition to the online responses to the listserv, I received a couple of additional emails.  Another person shared their observations of ground nesting bees that I thought might be of interest - ground nesting female bees usually do stay in their nests overnight, and some ground nesting females of the family Apidae have even been observed building small tunnels to overnight in even before they begin building their actual nests.  This is good stuff.  Thanks to all for sharing your observations.

                 

                Cheers!

                Jen Frye

                 

                Jennifer Frye

                Invertebrate Ecologist

                Wildlife and Heritage Service

                Maryland Department of Natural Resources

                P.O. Box 68

                909 Wye Mills Road

                Wye Mills , MD 21679

                Office: 410-827-8612 x102

                E-mail: jfrye@...

                 

                 

                 


                From: Jack Neff [mailto:jlnatctmi@...]
                Sent: Monday, November 04, 2013 3:44 PM
                To: Frye, Jennifer; beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com
                Subject: Re: [beemonitoring] Where do female bees go at night?

                 

                Females of non-parasitic species usually spend their nights in their nests so exposure to short lived pesticides applied at night should be minimal.  The main exceptions would be the few nocturnal specie. Occasionally a late foraging diurnal female will be caught out after dark and will have to spend the night on a flower or grasping a stem but that is not common.  Parasitic females often do spend their nights in exposed places so they will be at risk.

                 

                best

                 

                Jack

                 

                John L. Neff
                Central Texas Melittological Institute
                7307 Running Rope
                Austin , TX 78731 USA
                512-345-7219

                 

                On Monday, November 4, 2013 2:21 PM, "Frye, Jennifer" <jfrye@...> wrote:

                 

                Hi all,

                 

                I have been looking into the potential impacts of mosquito control larvicides to non-target organisms, including native bees (not honeybees).  I have heard it argued that because mosquito control activities are usually conducted at night (or at least at dusk), that the risk to bees is reduced because they are no longer foraging at that time.  The counter argument is that native bees may still be exposed to chemicals because they often spend the night at rest on flowers or plants.  I have seen Bombus males perched on flowers after dusk, and I can envision that male bees of solitary species do the same thing.  My question is do females do this as well?  Do solitary female bees that are actively laying eggs and provisioning their nests, tunnels, etc. with food resources also spend the evenings perched on vegetation, or are they more likely to be hanging out in their tunnels, tree cavities, or other nesting places? If anyone has observations or data on this topic, or any papers that address this issue that they could share, I would be very appreciative.

                 

                Thanks very much for your help!

                 

                Sincerely,

                Jen Frye

                 

                Jennifer Frye

                Invertebrate Ecologist

                Wildlife and Heritage Service

                Maryland Department of Natural Resources

                P.O. Box 68

                909 Wye Mills Road

                Wye Mills , MD 21679

                Office: 410-827-8612 x102

                E-mail: jfrye@...

                 

                 

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