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Fw: Carolina jessamine

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  • Carol Jelich
    I have a Carolina jessamine (Gelsemium sempervirens) in my garden and this is the first year that it has bloomed. It is covered with yellow blossoms. I
    Message 1 of 4 , Apr 23 5:38 AM
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      I have a Carolina jessamine (Gelsemium sempervirens) in my garden and this is the first year that it has bloomed.  It is covered with yellow blossoms.  I looked it up online to find out more about it, and one thing I see is that it is toxic to non-native bees such as honeybees.  (I live in Maryland).
       
      Looking at various anecdotal reports, I see that some say that bees avoid it, especially if other pollen sources are available, others say that dead honeybees pile up below the vine.  Also toxic to critters, including human ones.
       
      So, should I remove this plant?
       
      Thanks,
       
      Carol
    • Robinson Wainwright Sudan
      In my experience, large-bodied Bombus and Xylocopa seem to be attracted to it. And from a purely aesthetic point of view, I think it s a lovely plant. Sent
      Message 2 of 4 , Apr 23 5:52 AM
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        In my experience, large-bodied Bombus and Xylocopa seem to be attracted to it.  And from a purely aesthetic point of view, I think it's a lovely plant.  

        Sent from my iPhone

        On Apr 23, 2013, at 7:37 AM, "Carol Jelich" <jrj_csj@...> wrote:

         

        I have a Carolina jessamine (Gelsemium sempervirens) in my garden and this is the first year that it has bloomed.  It is covered with yellow blossoms.  I looked it up online to find out more about it, and one thing I see is that it is toxic to non-native bees such as honeybees.  (I live in Maryland).
         
        Looking at various anecdotal reports, I see that some say that bees avoid it, especially if other pollen sources are available, others say that dead honeybees pile up below the vine.  Also toxic to critters, including human ones.
         
        So, should I remove this plant?
         
        Thanks,
         
        Carol

      • Cane, Jim
        Carol- the native blueberry pollinator, Habropoda laboriosa, is in your region, and will regularly use this plant for nectar if blueberry bloom is pending or
        Message 3 of 4 , Apr 23 7:51 AM
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          Carol- the native blueberry pollinator, Habropoda laboriosa, is in your region, and will regularly use this plant for nectar if blueberry bloom is pending or past.  Moeover, studies in southern Georgia by John Pascarella showed that Jessamine can be an important pollen plant for Habropoda as well, and recommending planting it where blueberries are cultivated to boost bee populations.

           

          yours

           

          Jim

           

          ===============================

          James H. Cane

          USDA-ARS Pollinating Insect Research Unit

          Utah State University, Logan, UT 84322 USA

          tel: 435-797-3879   FAX: 435-797-0461

          email: Jim.Cane@... 

          web page: www.ars.usda.gov/npa/beelab

          publications: http://digitalcommons.usu.edu/piru/

          Gardening for Bees: http://extension.usu.edu/files/publications/factsheet/plants-pollinators09.pdf

           





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        • pollinator2001
          ... I m skeptical about the dead bees piling up. It is mildly toxic; but the worst I ve seen is some dead brood, and that is only on the years when it has a
          Message 4 of 4 , Apr 23 8:43 AM
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            --- In beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com, "Carol Jelich" <jrj_csj@...> wrote:
            >
            > I have a Carolina jessamine (Gelsemium sempervirens) in my garden and this is the first year that it has bloomed. It is covered with yellow blossoms. I looked it up online to find out more about it, and one thing I see is that it is toxic to non-native bees such as honeybees. (I live in Maryland).
            >
            > Looking at various anecdotal reports, I see that some say that bees avoid it, especially if other pollen sources are available, others say that dead honeybees pile up below the vine. Also toxic to critters, including human ones.


            I'm skeptical about the dead bees piling up. It is mildly toxic; but the worst I've seen is some dead brood, and that is only on the years when it has a heavy bloom. Most years, I think bees either ignore it, or it's such a minor source that it is safely diluted.

            The only thing I'd be concerned about is kids who think this is a kind of honeysuckle and sip the nectar from the flowers. It can make them sick.

            Dave
            Retired pollination contractor
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