Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

RE: [beemonitoring] Bombus ID

Expand Messages
  • Rykken, Jessica
    Earlier this afternoon I posted a photo of a bumble bee for ID, and there is some question as to whether it is B. vosnesenskii or B. caliginosus. I ve been
    Message 1 of 6 , Mar 27, 2013
    • 0 Attachment
      Earlier this afternoon I posted a photo of a bumble bee for ID, and there is some question as to whether it is B. vosnesenskii or B. caliginosus.  I've been able to make contact with the photographer and found out she took the photo in her garden at the southern end of Puget Sound in Washington (so, sea level).  Does this help?

      Here is the photo again:
      http://www.flickr.com/photos/kitkaphotogirl/3809077249/sizes/l/in/photostream/


      Thanks again.

      Jessica

      Jessica Rykken
      Research Associate
      Museum of Comparative Zoology
      Harvard University
      26 Oxford St.
      Cambridge, MA 02138
      phone:  617-496-1221 or 413-665-0412
      fax:  617-495-5667
       

      From: beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com [beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com] on behalf of Doug Yanega [dyanega@...]
      Sent: Wednesday, March 27, 2013 2:09 PM
      To: beemon
      Subject: Re: [beemonitoring] Bombus ID

       

      On 3/27/13 10:39 AM, Rykken, Jessica wrote:
       

      Hi, I'm hoping to confirm an ID of a bumble bee photo on a Flickr site.

      The photo can be found here:  http://www.flickr.com/photos/kitkaphotogirl/3809077249/sizes/l/in/photostream/

      My best guess is Bombus vosnesenskii, but I want to be pretty sure.  Can anyone confirm my id, or offer an alternative? I think the photo was taken somewhere in the Pacific Northwest.
      I don't think one can rule out B. caliginosus; in fact, the pubescence seems a little long and wispy for vosnesenskii, but would be consistent with caliginosus.
      -- 
      Doug Yanega      Dept. of Entomology       Entomology Research Museum
      Univ. of California, Riverside, CA 92521-0314     skype: dyanega
      phone: (951) 827-4315 (disclaimer: opinions are mine, not UCR's)
                   http://cache.ucr.edu/~heraty/yanega.html
        "There are some enterprises in which a careful disorderliness
              is the true method" - Herman Melville, Moby Dick, Chap. 82

    • Dana Visalli
      Hi Jessica; I m an interested amateur......I put a key together for bumblebees in Washington state from the information I could find, and here s what it says
      Message 2 of 6 , Mar 27, 2013
      • 0 Attachment
         
        Hi Jessica;
         
        I'm an interested amateur......I put a key together for bumblebees in Washington state from the information I could find, and here's what it says for
        vosnesenskii and caliginosus.  You picked a tough pair to parse. 
         

        These last two species prove to be almost impossible to tell apart; the distinction is made by the length of the ‘cheek’ relative to its width, which is explained in Bumblebees of the Western United States.  Note they are both coastal species.
        31A. Cheeks usually longer than broad……B. caliginosus—Dark BB (coastal, not in the Methow, head & face yellow, scutum yellow, alar region black, scutellum black, T1-T3 black, T4 yellow, T5-6 black, cheeks as long as broad, side of thorax predominately black, easily confused with B. vosnesenskii & B. vandykei).
        31B. Cheeks as broad as long….B. vosnesenskii—Yellow-faced BB (coastal, not in Methow, face and head yellow, scutum yellow, alar region black, scutellum black, T1-3 black, T4 yellow, T5-6 black, cheek as long as broad, side of thorax predominately black, easily confused with B. calinginosus & vandykei—for an image of vosnesenskii see calinginosus)

        While I'm at it, I was delighted to see my first wild bee yesterday, on our earliest wildflower, Ranunculus glaberrimus, sagebrush butterup.  Looks like it's keying to Halictus....the terga are fringed with hairs.

        There's no key to western Halictus species available is there, short of driving to Ogden?

         
        Dana Visalli
         


         
         
         
        ----- Original Message -----
        To: beemon
        Sent: Wednesday, March 27, 2013 12:59 PM
        Subject: RE: [beemonitoring] Bombus ID

         

        Earlier this afternoon I posted a photo of a bumble bee for ID, and there is some question as to whether it is B. vosnesenskii or B. caliginosus.  I've been able to make contact with the photographer and found out she took the photo in her garden at the southern end of Puget Sound in Washington (so, sea level).  Does this help?

        Here is the photo again:
        http://www.flickr.com/photos/kitkaphotogirl/3809077249/sizes/l/in/photostream/


        Thanks again.

        Jessica

        Jessica Rykken
        Research Associate
        Museum of Comparative Zoology
        Harvard University
        26 Oxford St.
        Cambridge, MA 02138
        phone:  617-496-1221 or 413-665-0412
        fax:  617-495-5667
         

        From: beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com [beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com] on behalf of Doug Yanega [dyanega@...]
        Sent: Wednesday, March 27, 2013 2:09 PM
        To: beemon
        Subject: Re: [beemonitoring] Bombus ID

         

        On 3/27/13 10:39 AM, Rykken, Jessica wrote:
         

        Hi, I'm hoping to confirm an ID of a bumble bee photo on a Flickr site.

        The photo can be found here:  http://www.flickr.com/photos/kitkaphotogirl/3809077249/sizes/l/in/photostream/

        My best guess is Bombus vosnesenskii, but I want to be pretty sure.  Can anyone confirm my id, or offer an alternative? I think the photo was taken somewhere in the Pacific Northwest.
        I don't think one can rule out B. caliginosus; in fact, the pubescence seems a little long and wispy for vosnesenskii, but would be consistent with caliginosus.
        -- 
        Doug Yanega      Dept. of Entomology       Entomology Research Museum
        Univ. of California, Riverside, CA 92521-0314     skype: dyanega
        phone: (951) 827-4315 (disclaimer: opinions are mine, not UCR's)
                     http://cache.ucr.edu/~heraty/yanega.html
          "There are some enterprises in which a careful disorderliness
                is the true method" - Herman Melville, Moby Dick, Chap. 82

      • Doug Yanega
        ... The bee in that photo looks much more like a male Andrena. The head is large, entirely dark, and the abdominal bands look to be thin and non-appressed.
        Message 3 of 6 , Mar 27, 2013
        • 0 Attachment
          On 3/27/13 2:24 PM, Dana Visalli wrote:
           

          While I'm at it, I was delighted to see my first wild bee yesterday, on our earliest wildflower, Ranunculus glaberrimus, sagebrush butterup.  Looks like it's keying to Halictus....the terga are fringed with hairs.

          There's no key to western Halictus species available is there, short of driving to Ogden?

          The bee in that photo looks much more like a male Andrena. The head is large, entirely dark, and the abdominal bands look to be thin and non-appressed. There are very few west coast Halictus species, all fairly easily told apart; ligatus, farinosus, and rubicundus are the only non-metallic species.

          Peace,
          -- 
          Doug Yanega      Dept. of Entomology       Entomology Research Museum
          Univ. of California, Riverside, CA 92521-0314     skype: dyanega
          phone: (951) 827-4315 (disclaimer: opinions are mine, not UCR's)
                       http://cache.ucr.edu/~heraty/yanega.html
            "There are some enterprises in which a careful disorderliness
                  is the true method" - Herman Melville, Moby Dick, Chap. 82
        • <Gordon.Hutchings@...>
          Well, on the note of seeing one s first native bees... Besides several bumble bees including Bombus melanopygus, I ve seen my first Andrena males in my area of
          Message 4 of 6 , Mar 27, 2013
          • 0 Attachment
            Well, on the note of seeing one's first native bees...
             
            Besides several bumble bees including Bombus melanopygus, I've seen my first Andrena males in my area of southern Vancouver Island this past weekend. I saw my first Osmia lignaria propinqua male on Feb. 23rd for what it's worth.
             
            Gord Hutchings


            From: beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com [mailto:beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Doug Yanega
            Sent: Wednesday, 27, March, 2013 15:18 PM
            To: beemon
            Subject: Re: [beemonitoring] Bombus ID

             

            On 3/27/13 2:24 PM, Dana Visalli wrote:
             

            While I'm at it, I was delighted to see my first wild bee yesterday, on our earliest wildflower, Ranunculus glaberrimus, sagebrush butterup.  Looks like it's keying to Halictus....the terga are fringed with hairs.

            There's no key to western Halictus species available is there, short of driving to Ogden?

            The bee in that photo looks much more like a male Andrena. The head is large, entirely dark, and the abdominal bands look to be thin and non-appressed. There are very few west coast Halictus species, all fairly easily told apart; ligatus, farinosus, and rubicundus are the only non-metallic species.

            Peace,
            -- 
            Doug Yanega      Dept. of Entomology       Entomology Research Museum
            Univ. of California, Riverside, CA 92521-0314     skype: dyanega
            phone: (951) 827-4315 (disclaimer: opinions are mine, not UCR's)
                         http://cache.ucr.edu/~heraty/yanega.html
              "There are some enterprises in which a careful disorderliness
                    is the true method" - Herman Melville, Moby Dick, Chap. 82

          Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.