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Re: [beemonitoring] Field margins - agricultural practices and bee populations

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  • Kimball Clark
    Michael, After dealing with Osmia lignaria since 08, surely their survival rate has some say in the health of their local habitat. I look at their affluence
    Message 1 of 8 , Feb 15, 2013
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      Michael,

      After dealing with Osmia lignaria since '08, surely their survival rate has some say in the health of their local habitat. I look at their affluence as a health-o-meter. Theresa Pitts-Singer (USDA) once eluded that if growers made their orchards suitable for bees, their crop would surely benefit. I believe that, but:

      My results with O. lignaria use reveal I am achieving a higher propagation return in backyard environments than in conventional agriculture—but I'm not going to definitively say this result is due to any (or a combination of) -icides. At this point I am hypothesizing the increased rate in backyards is due to a larger, closer water (and thus mud) abundance, and due to pollen diversity (a prolonged availability of food). Understand that many orchards grow a single crop whose blossoms fall at the same time, and pollen/nectar is substantially limited thereafter. In most orchards, It's either feast or famine for O. lignaria—not very healthy for a bee that doesn't typically prefer traveling far distances.

      Although I know some -icides are very bad for insects, I am skeptical to jump on the all out contra -icide bandwagon. There has been science presented to me (at least for O. lignaria) that reveals many -icides DON'T endanger them (that we know).

      Returning to what I had written in my first paragraph, I do believe growers can plan unique, diverse orchards that would be highly beneficial to bees. I certainly agree with Theresa in that bee prosperity does equate to crop prosperity. For O. lignaria: Shelter, Water (in abundance), Food (in abundance). Sound familiar?

      Sincerely,

      Kimball Clark
      Native Bee Nerd

      Buy bees at http://www.NativeBees.com
      View some of our work at http://www.research.nativebees.com
      Kaysville, UT • 801-458-0282







      On Feb 14, 2013, at 7:55 PM, Michael Eckenfels wrote:


      I'm curious if anyone has contrasted conventional agriculture with organic, pesticide-free practices in terms of bee density.  Seems that data could serve as a complimentary approach to the current efforts in determining pesticide effects on pollinators.

      Michael


      From: saraguitiprado <sara.guiti.prado@...>
      To: beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com 
      Sent: Thursday, February 14, 2013 10:39 AM
      Subject: [beemonitoring] Field margins - agricultural practices and bee populations

       
      Hi Everyone,

      I'm curious to see if anyone knows of any studies where the three way interaction between field margins, agricultural practices (i.e. chemicals, tilling, etc) and bee abundance and diversity has been assessed. 

      Are the bees foraging/living in the field margins still affected by agricultural practices? or is the field margin a complete refuge? Is the bee abundance and diversity found in the field margin as high as it could be, or is it not able to reach its maximum because of potential negative effects of chemical drift, tilling, etc.? 

      Thanks!





      Kimball Clark
      Kaysville, UT

      On Feb 14, 2013, at 7:55 PM, Michael Eckenfels wrote:

       

      I'm curious if anyone has contrasted conventional agriculture with organic, pesticide-free practices in terms of bee density.  Seems that data could serve as a complimentary approach to the current efforts in determining pesticide effects on pollinators.

      Michael


      From: saraguitiprado <sara.guiti.prado@...>
      To: beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Thursday, February 14, 2013 10:39 AM
      Subject: [beemonitoring] Field margins - agricultural practices and bee populations

       
      Hi Everyone,

      I'm curious to see if anyone knows of any studies where the three way interaction between field margins, agricultural practices (i.e. chemicals, tilling, etc) and bee abundance and diversity has been assessed.

      Are the bees foraging/living in the field margins still affected by agricultural practices? or is the field margin a complete refuge? Is the bee abundance and diversity found in the field margin as high as it could be, or is it not able to reach its maximum because of potential negative effects of chemical drift, tilling, etc.?

      Thanks!





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