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RE: [beemonitoring] Bees and Roadkill

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  • david almquist
    Or put huge sticky-trap panels on some vehicles and extrapolate from there. I ve always found the number of 20 million leps in one week just in the state of
    Message 1 of 8 , Feb 11, 2013
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      Or put huge sticky-trap panels on some vehicles and extrapolate from there.

      I've always found the number of 20 million leps in one week just in the state of Illinois in this article, cited in the one that you sent, to be incredible if tney are anywhere near the ballpark with their extrapolations. 
      http://images.peabody.yale.edu/lepsoc/jls/2000s/2001/2001-55(2)63-McKenna.pdf 


      To: beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com
      From: sdroege@...
      Date: Mon, 11 Feb 2013 08:29:13 -0500
      Subject: [beemonitoring] Bees and Roadkill

       


      All:

      I just came across a small study of road-killed insects in Japan:


      While I think there are some possible errors in their calculations of mortality/ km  (they estimate 5000+ insects per KM, but don't account for days not sampled or loss due to scavenging, capture by car, size of insect, or non-detectability by observer)  it none the less documents that many more insects are killed along roads than I would have expected.

      This study documented only moderate numbers of Hymenoptera in their totals, but their citations indicate that Hymenoptera can make up much larger portions depending on the habitat along the road.

      This study is also intriguing in that the researchers simply walked along the edge of the road and picked up dead insects...which I would have thought would have been difficult to do (and probably represents a gross underestimate of the real kill).  

      I think that similar projects would make wonderful student projects, but suggest the following:

      Address the scavenging loss by using marked or known dead insects in sections of roads.

      Address detection rates by having 1 observer seed an area with dead insects and having another count them, using several size classes.

      sam

      Sam Droege  sdroege@...                      
      w 301-497-5840 h 301-390-7759 fax 301-497-5624
      USGS Patuxent Wildlife Research Center
      BARC-EAST, BLDG 308, RM 124 10300 Balt. Ave., Beltsville, MD  20705
      Http://www.pwrc.usgs.gov
                                                     
      A little road not made of man,
      Enabled of the eye,
      Accessible to thill of bee,
      Or cart of butterfly.

      If town it have, beyond itself,
      'T is that I cannot say;
      I only sigh,--no vehicle
      Bears me along that way.
        --Dickinson




      --
      Bees are Not Optional
      蜂はオプションではありません

    • <barbara.abraham@...>
      Another source of error is scavenging on dead insects. Once I was driving down a gravel road in Iowa and noticed tettigoniid grasshoppers (mainly Orchelimum
      Message 2 of 8 , Feb 11, 2013
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        Another source of error is scavenging on dead insects. Once I was driving down a gravel road in Iowa and noticed tettigoniid grasshoppers (mainly Orchelimum vulgare, which I was studying) feasting on acridid roadkill – most large female acridids had a scavenger!

         

        Barbara J. Abraham, Ph.D.

        Associate Professor

        SEEDS Ecology Chapter Advisor

        Department of Biological Sciences

        Hampton University

        Hampton, VA  23668

        757-727-5283

        barbara.abraham@...

         

        From: beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com [mailto:beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Droege, Sam
        Sent: Monday, February 11, 2013 8:29 AM
        To: Bee United
        Subject: [beemonitoring] Bees and Roadkill

         

         


        All:

         

        I just came across a small study of road-killed insects in Japan:

         

         

        While I think there are some possible errors in their calculations of mortality/ km  (they estimate 5000+ insects per KM, but don't account for days not sampled or loss due to scavenging, capture by car, size of insect, or non-detectability by observer)  it none the less documents that many more insects are killed along roads than I would have expected.

         

        This study documented only moderate numbers of Hymenoptera in their totals, but their citations indicate that Hymenoptera can make up much larger portions depending on the habitat along the road.

         

        This study is also intriguing in that the researchers simply walked along the edge of the road and picked up dead insects...which I would have thought would have been difficult to do (and probably represents a gross underestimate of the real kill).  

         

        I think that similar projects would make wonderful student projects, but suggest the following:

         

        Address the scavenging loss by using marked or known dead insects in sections of roads.

         

        Address detection rates by having 1 observer seed an area with dead insects and having another count them, using several size classes.

         

        sam

         

        Sam Droege  sdroege@...                      
        w 301-497-5840 h 301-390-7759 fax 301-497-5624
        USGS Patuxent Wildlife Research Center
        BARC-EAST, BLDG 308, RM 124 10300 Balt. Ave., Beltsville, MD  20705
        Http://www.pwrc.usgs.gov
                                                       
        A little road not made of man,
        Enabled of the eye,
        Accessible to thill of bee,
        Or cart of butterfly.

        If town it have, beyond itself,
        'T is that I cannot say;
        I only sigh,--no vehicle
        Bears me along that way.
          --Dickinson

         

         

         

         

        --

        Bees are Not Optional

        蜂はオプションではありません

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      • kimberly huntzinger
        I ve been wondering about bumble bee kill along bike paths due to those pesky cyclists ;-) because I have noticed quite a few dead bumbles when I run those
        Message 3 of 8 , Feb 11, 2013
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          I've been wondering about bumble bee kill along bike paths due to those pesky cyclists ;-) because I have noticed quite a few dead bumbles when I run those same paths.  Runners aren't going fast enough to mortally injure the bees that hit us, plus we are softer than bikers (especially lacking is the helmet)...and sweeter...at least I am, I say sorry to the bees that I accidentally bumb into.

          Sent from my iPad

          On Feb 11, 2013, at 6:29 AM, "Droege, Sam" <sdroege@...> wrote:

           


          All:

          I just came across a small study of road-killed insects in Japan:


          While I think there are some possible errors in their calculations of mortality/ km  (they estimate 5000+ insects per KM, but don't account for days not sampled or loss due to scavenging, capture by car, size of insect, or non-detectability by observer)  it none the less documents that many more insects are killed along roads than I would have expected.

          This study documented only moderate numbers of Hymenoptera in their totals, but their citations indicate that Hymenoptera can make up much larger portions depending on the habitat along the road.

          This study is also intriguing in that the researchers simply walked along the edge of the road and picked up dead insects...which I would have thought would have been difficult to do (and probably represents a gross underestimate of the real kill).  

          I think that similar projects would make wonderful student projects, but suggest the following:

          Address the scavenging loss by using marked or known dead insects in sections of roads.

          Address detection rates by having 1 observer seed an area with dead insects and having another count them, using several size classes.

          sam

          Sam Droege  sdroege@...                      
          w 301-497-5840 h 301-390-7759 fax 301-497-5624
          USGS Patuxent Wildlife Research Center
          BARC-EAST, BLDG 308, RM 124 10300 Balt. Ave., Beltsville, MD  20705
          Http://www.pwrc.usgs.gov
                                                         
          A little road not made of man,
          Enabled of the eye,
          Accessible to thill of bee,
          Or cart of butterfly.

          If town it have, beyond itself,
          'T is that I cannot say;
          I only sigh,--no vehicle
          Bears me along that way.
            --Dickinson




          --
          Bees are Not Optional
          蜂はオプションではありません

        • Weber, Don
          Sam, This recalls when I observed house sparrows in a parking lot in Gatlinburg Tennessee years ago, hopping up onto car radiators in back of their front
          Message 4 of 8 , Feb 11, 2013
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            Sam,

            This recalls when I observed house sparrows in a parking lot in Gatlinburg Tennessee years ago, hopping up onto car radiators in back of their front grills, scavenging dead insects.  Many road-killed insects are trapped and killed and carried away on various parts of the car, perhaps fewer, now that they are more streamlined.  You’d have to have two roadblocks to determine how many for a given stretch of road.  Sounds like an experiment in the making.

            DW

             

            ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

            Donald C. Weber, Research Entomologist & Lead Scientist

            USDA Agricultural Research Service

            Invasive Insect Biocontrol & Behavior Laboratory

            Bldg. 011A, Rm. 107, BARC-West Beltsville, MD 20705  USA

            Don.Weber@...

             

            From: beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com [mailto:beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Droege, Sam
            Sent: Monday, February 11, 2013 8:29
            To: Bee United
            Subject: [beemonitoring] Bees and Roadkill

             

             


            All:

             

            I just came across a small study of road-killed insects in Japan:

             

             

            While I think there are some possible errors in their calculations of mortality/ km  (they estimate 5000+ insects per KM, but don't account for days not sampled or loss due to scavenging, capture by car, size of insect, or non-detectability by observer)  it none the less documents that many more insects are killed along roads than I would have expected.

             

            This study documented only moderate numbers of Hymenoptera in their totals, but their citations indicate that Hymenoptera can make up much larger portions depending on the habitat along the road.

             

            This study is also intriguing in that the researchers simply walked along the edge of the road and picked up dead insects...which I would have thought would have been difficult to do (and probably represents a gross underestimate of the real kill).  

             

            I think that similar projects would make wonderful student projects, but suggest the following:

             

            Address the scavenging loss by using marked or known dead insects in sections of roads.

             

            Address detection rates by having 1 observer seed an area with dead insects and having another count them, using several size classes.

             

            sam

             

            Sam Droege  sdroege@...                      
            w 301-497-5840 h 301-390-7759 fax 301-497-5624
            USGS Patuxent Wildlife Research Center
            BARC-EAST, BLDG 308, RM 124 10300 Balt. Ave., Beltsville, MD  20705
            Http://www.pwrc.usgs.gov
                                                           
            A little road not made of man,
            Enabled of the eye,
            Accessible to thill of bee,
            Or cart of butterfly.

            If town it have, beyond itself,
            'T is that I cannot say;
            I only sigh,--no vehicle
            Bears me along that way.
              --Dickinson

             

             

             

             

            --

            Bees are Not Optional

            蜂はオプションではありません





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          • pollinator2001
            ... Fire ants will quickly dispose of dead insects in the South of the US. Dave Green, Ret. pollination contractor Coastal SC
            Message 5 of 8 , Feb 11, 2013
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              --- In beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com, wrote:
              >
              > Another source of error is scavenging on dead insects. Once I was driving down a gravel road in Iowa and noticed tettigoniid grasshoppers (mainly Orchelimum vulgare, which I was studying) feasting on acridid roadkill â€" most large female acridids had a scavenger!


              Fire ants will quickly dispose of dead insects in the South of the US.

              Dave Green, Ret. pollination contractor
              Coastal SC
            • <Gordon.Hutchings@...>
              I ve seen the early and evening crew of ravens cleaning up roadkill in many places in the north. The majority of specimens were odonata, bumble bees, beetles
              Message 6 of 8 , Feb 11, 2013
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                I've seen the early and evening crew of ravens cleaning up roadkill in many places in the north. The majority of specimens were odonata, bumble bees, beetles and large flies, but these volumes changed in the accompanying habitat adjacent to the road such as open field, forest or wetland. Even forest fire areas produced more buprestids than anything else. Of course I collected several specimens and was always surprised at the species I collected on the road when all day I hadn't seen them in their particular habitat.
                 
                Gord Hutchings


                From: beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com [mailto:beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of pollinator2001
                Sent: Monday, 11, February, 2013 16:08 PM
                To: beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com
                Subject: [beemonitoring] Re: Bees and Roadkill

                 



                --- In beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com, wrote:

                >
                > Another source of error is scavenging on dead insects.
                Once I was driving down a gravel road in Iowa and noticed tettigoniid grasshoppers (mainly Orchelimum vulgare, which I was studying) feasting on acridid roadkill â€" most large female acridids had a scavenger!

                Fire ants will quickly dispose of dead insects in the South of the US.

                Dave Green, Ret. pollination contractor
                Coastal SC

              • Liz Day
                ... I have seen this too with a Mockingbird that had obviously learned to watch each car as it came in and that grabbed butterflies off my grill before I could
                Message 7 of 8 , Feb 12, 2013
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                  >This recalls when I observed house sparrows in a parking lot in
                  >Gatlinburg Tennessee years ago, hopping up onto car radiators in
                  >back of their front grills, scavenging dead insects.

                  I have seen this too with a Mockingbird that had obviously learned to
                  watch each car as it came in and that grabbed butterflies off my
                  grill before I could even get out of my car. I don't know how one
                  would count the bees that ended up this way.

                  Liz Day
                  Indianapolis, USA
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