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Re: [beemonitoring] Agapostemon

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  • Dana Visalli
    Many thanks to the advisory board; so many green metallic bees, so little time. I ll work on them over the winter. Dana ... From: John Ascher To: Jack Neff ;
    Message 1 of 7 , Oct 12, 2012
    • 0 Attachment
       
      Many thanks to the advisory board; so many green metallic bees, so little time. 
      I'll work on them over the winter.
       
      Dana
       
      ----- Original Message -----
      Sent: Friday, October 12, 2012 10:24 AM
      Subject: RE: [beemonitoring] Agapostemon

      The bee with the closeup of the mesosoma is a female Osmia (Melanosmia) sensu lato in the Chenosmia group.

       

      John S. Ascher, PhD
      Research Scientist
      Division of Invertebrate Zoology
      American Museum of Natural History
      Central Park W @ 79th St.
      New York, NY 10024-5192
      212-496-3447 work
      917-407-0378 cell

      From: beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com [beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com] on behalf of Jack Neff [jlnatctmi@...]
      Sent: Friday, October 12, 2012 12:28 PM
      To: Dana Visalli; Bee Monitoring
      Subject: Re: [beemonitoring] Agapostemon


      The bee with the closeup of the mesosoma is clearly not an Agapostemon (the shape and sculpture of the propodeal area is all wrong).  Since their aren't supposed to be any augochlorines in the NW, a metallic Osmia is a good guess.  The Calochortus bee remains an Agapostemon

      best

      Jack
       
      John L. Neff
      Central Texas Melittological Institute
      7307 Running Rope
      Austin,TX 78731 USA
      512-345-7219

      From: Dana Visalli <dana@...>
      To: Bee Monitoring <beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Friday, October 12, 2012 10:34 AM
      Subject: [beemonitoring] Agapostemon

       
       
      I'd like to check in again with this Agapostemon:
       
      I found I had collected what is probably the same bee during the summer.
       
      Using 'Bees of Northwestern America: Agapostemon' which 'H' pointed out is a pdf online,
      it looks like it has to be texanus or femoratus, range-wise-- as several people on this list
      pointed out. 
       
      Here are the scutums of the two from that source, 13 is femoratus and 14-15 is texanus:
       
      and here is the best shot I've been able to get of my bee, beginning photography 101:
       
      Which one is it?  Seems like femoratus.
       
      Thanks,
       
      Dana


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