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Agapostemon

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  • Dana Visalli
    I d like to check in again with this Agapostemon: I found I had collected what is probably the same bee during the summer. Using Bees of Northwestern America:
    Message 1 of 7 , Oct 12, 2012
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      I'd like to check in again with this Agapostemon:
       
       
      I found I had collected what is probably the same bee during the summer.
       
      Using 'Bees of Northwestern America: Agapostemon' which 'H' pointed out is a pdf online,
      it looks like it has to be texanus or femoratus, range-wise-- as several people on this list
      pointed out. 
       
      Here are the scutums of the two from that source, 13 is femoratus and 14-15 is texanus:
       
       
      and here is the best shot I've been able to get of my bee, beginning photography 101:
       
       
      Which one is it?  Seems like femoratus.
       
      Thanks,
       
      Dana
    • Jelle Devalez
      This is a different bee... I would say this is a metallic Osmia. Jelle
      Message 2 of 7 , Oct 12, 2012
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        This is a different bee... I would say this is a metallic Osmia.

        Jelle

        On Fri, Oct 12, 2012 at 6:34 PM, Dana Visalli <dana@...> wrote:
         

         
        I'd like to check in again with this Agapostemon:
         
         
        I found I had collected what is probably the same bee during the summer.
         
        Using 'Bees of Northwestern America: Agapostemon' which 'H' pointed out is a pdf online,
        it looks like it has to be texanus or femoratus, range-wise-- as several people on this list
        pointed out. 
         
        Here are the scutums of the two from that source, 13 is femoratus and 14-15 is texanus:
         
         
        and here is the best shot I've been able to get of my bee, beginning photography 101:
         
         
        Which one is it?  Seems like femoratus.
         
        Thanks,
         
        Dana


      • barbara.abraham@hamptonu.edu
        Not an Osmia - look at the pollen on its legs? Barb Barbara J. Abraham, Ph.D. Associate Professor SEEDS Ecology Chapter Advisor Department of Biological
        Message 3 of 7 , Oct 12, 2012
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          Not an Osmia – look at the pollen on its legs?

           

          Barb

           

          Barbara J. Abraham, Ph.D.

          Associate Professor

          SEEDS Ecology Chapter Advisor

          Department of Biological Sciences

          Hampton University

          Hampton, VA  23668

          757-727-5283

          barbara.abraham@...

           

          From: beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com [mailto:beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Jelle Devalez
          Sent: Friday, October 12, 2012 12:06 PM
          To: Dana Visalli
          Cc: Bee Monitoring
          Subject: Re: [beemonitoring] Agapostemon

           

           

          This is a different bee... I would say this is a metallic Osmia.

          Jelle

          On Fri, Oct 12, 2012 at 6:34 PM, Dana Visalli <dana@...> wrote:

           

           

          I'd like to check in again with this Agapostemon:

           

           

          I found I had collected what is probably the same bee during the summer.

           

          Using 'Bees of Northwestern America: Agapostemon' which 'H' pointed out is a pdf online,

          it looks like it has to be texanus or femoratus, range-wise-- as several people on this list

          pointed out. 

           

          Here are the scutums of the two from that source, 13 is femoratus and 14-15 is texanus:

           

           

          and here is the best shot I've been able to get of my bee, beginning photography 101:

           

           

          Which one is it?  Seems like femoratus.

           

          Thanks,

           

          Dana

           

          The information contained in this message is intended only for the recipient, and may otherwise be privileged and confidential. If the reader of this message is not the intended recipient, or an employee or agent responsible for delivering this message to the intended recipient, please be aware that any dissemination or copying of this communication is strictly prohibited. If you have received this communication in error, please immediately notify us by replying to the message and deleting it from your computer. This footnote also confirms that this email has been scanned for all viruses by the Hampton University Center for Information Technology Enterprise Systems service.
        • Jason Gibbs
          The close up picture, an Osmia, is not the same bee as the one on the flower, an Agapostemon. ... -- Jason Gibbs Post-Doctoral Associate Department of
          Message 4 of 7 , Oct 12, 2012
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            The close up picture, an Osmia, is not the same bee as the one on the flower, an Agapostemon.

            On 12 October 2012 12:11, <barbara.abraham@...> wrote:
             

            Not an Osmia – look at the pollen on its legs?

             

            Barb

             

            Barbara J. Abraham, Ph.D.

            Associate Professor

            SEEDS Ecology Chapter Advisor

            Department of Biological Sciences

            Hampton University

            Hampton, VA  23668

            757-727-5283

            barbara.abraham@...

             

            From: beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com [mailto:beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Jelle Devalez
            Sent: Friday, October 12, 2012 12:06 PM
            To: Dana Visalli
            Cc: Bee Monitoring
            Subject: Re: [beemonitoring] Agapostemon

             

             

            This is a different bee... I would say this is a metallic Osmia.

            Jelle

            On Fri, Oct 12, 2012 at 6:34 PM, Dana Visalli <dana@...> wrote:

             

             

            I'd like to check in again with this Agapostemon:

             

             

            I found I had collected what is probably the same bee during the summer.

             

            Using 'Bees of Northwestern America: Agapostemon' which 'H' pointed out is a pdf online,

            it looks like it has to be texanus or femoratus, range-wise-- as several people on this list

            pointed out. 

             

            Here are the scutums of the two from that source, 13 is femoratus and 14-15 is texanus:

             

             

            and here is the best shot I've been able to get of my bee, beginning photography 101:

             

             

            Which one is it?  Seems like femoratus.

             

            Thanks,

             

            Dana

             

            The information contained in this message is intended only for the recipient, and may otherwise be privileged and confidential. If the reader of this message is not the intended recipient, or an employee or agent responsible for delivering this message to the intended recipient, please be aware that any dissemination or copying of this communication is strictly prohibited. If you have received this communication in error, please immediately notify us by replying to the message and deleting it from your computer. This footnote also confirms that this email has been scanned for all viruses by the Hampton University Center for Information Technology Enterprise Systems service.




            --
            Jason Gibbs
            Post-Doctoral Associate
            Department of Entomology
            Cornell University
            3119 Comstock Hall
            Ithaca, New York, USA
            14853

          • Jack Neff
            The bee with the closeup of the mesosoma is clearly not an Agapostemon (the shape and sculpture of the propodeal area is all wrong).  Since their aren t
            Message 5 of 7 , Oct 12, 2012
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              The bee with the closeup of the mesosoma is clearly not an Agapostemon (the shape and sculpture of the propodeal area is all wrong).  Since their aren't supposed to be any augochlorines in the NW, a metallic Osmia is a good guess.  The Calochortus bee remains an Agapostemon

              best

              Jack
               
              John L. Neff
              Central Texas Melittological Institute
              7307 Running Rope
              Austin,TX 78731 USA
              512-345-7219

              From: Dana Visalli <dana@...>
              To: Bee Monitoring <beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com>
              Sent: Friday, October 12, 2012 10:34 AM
              Subject: [beemonitoring] Agapostemon

               
               
              I'd like to check in again with this Agapostemon:
               
               
              I found I had collected what is probably the same bee during the summer.
               
              Using 'Bees of Northwestern America: Agapostemon' which 'H' pointed out is a pdf online,
              it looks like it has to be texanus or femoratus, range-wise-- as several people on this list
              pointed out. 
               
              Here are the scutums of the two from that source, 13 is femoratus and 14-15 is texanus:
               
               
              and here is the best shot I've been able to get of my bee, beginning photography 101:
               
               
              Which one is it?  Seems like femoratus.
               
              Thanks,
               
              Dana


            • John Ascher
              The bee with the closeup of the mesosoma is a female Osmia (Melanosmia) sensu lato in the Chenosmia group. John S. Ascher, PhD Research Scientist Division of
              Message 6 of 7 , Oct 12, 2012
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                The bee with the closeup of the mesosoma is a female Osmia (Melanosmia) sensu lato in the Chenosmia group.

                 

                John S. Ascher, PhD
                Research Scientist
                Division of Invertebrate Zoology
                American Museum of Natural History
                Central Park W @ 79th St.
                New York, NY 10024-5192
                212-496-3447 work
                917-407-0378 cell

                From: beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com [beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com] on behalf of Jack Neff [jlnatctmi@...]
                Sent: Friday, October 12, 2012 12:28 PM
                To: Dana Visalli; Bee Monitoring
                Subject: Re: [beemonitoring] Agapostemon


                The bee with the closeup of the mesosoma is clearly not an Agapostemon (the shape and sculpture of the propodeal area is all wrong).  Since their aren't supposed to be any augochlorines in the NW, a metallic Osmia is a good guess.  The Calochortus bee remains an Agapostemon

                best

                Jack
                 
                John L. Neff
                Central Texas Melittological Institute
                7307 Running Rope
                Austin,TX 78731 USA
                512-345-7219

                From: Dana Visalli <dana@...>
                To: Bee Monitoring <beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com>
                Sent: Friday, October 12, 2012 10:34 AM
                Subject: [beemonitoring] Agapostemon

                 
                 
                I'd like to check in again with this Agapostemon:
                 
                 
                I found I had collected what is probably the same bee during the summer.
                 
                Using 'Bees of Northwestern America: Agapostemon' which 'H' pointed out is a pdf online,
                it looks like it has to be texanus or femoratus, range-wise-- as several people on this list
                pointed out. 
                 
                Here are the scutums of the two from that source, 13 is femoratus and 14-15 is texanus:
                 
                 
                and here is the best shot I've been able to get of my bee, beginning photography 101:
                 
                 
                Which one is it?  Seems like femoratus.
                 
                Thanks,
                 
                Dana


              • Dana Visalli
                Many thanks to the advisory board; so many green metallic bees, so little time. I ll work on them over the winter. Dana ... From: John Ascher To: Jack Neff ;
                Message 7 of 7 , Oct 12, 2012
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                  Many thanks to the advisory board; so many green metallic bees, so little time. 
                  I'll work on them over the winter.
                   
                  Dana
                   
                  ----- Original Message -----
                  Sent: Friday, October 12, 2012 10:24 AM
                  Subject: RE: [beemonitoring] Agapostemon

                  The bee with the closeup of the mesosoma is a female Osmia (Melanosmia) sensu lato in the Chenosmia group.

                   

                  John S. Ascher, PhD
                  Research Scientist
                  Division of Invertebrate Zoology
                  American Museum of Natural History
                  Central Park W @ 79th St.
                  New York, NY 10024-5192
                  212-496-3447 work
                  917-407-0378 cell

                  From: beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com [beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com] on behalf of Jack Neff [jlnatctmi@...]
                  Sent: Friday, October 12, 2012 12:28 PM
                  To: Dana Visalli; Bee Monitoring
                  Subject: Re: [beemonitoring] Agapostemon


                  The bee with the closeup of the mesosoma is clearly not an Agapostemon (the shape and sculpture of the propodeal area is all wrong).  Since their aren't supposed to be any augochlorines in the NW, a metallic Osmia is a good guess.  The Calochortus bee remains an Agapostemon

                  best

                  Jack
                   
                  John L. Neff
                  Central Texas Melittological Institute
                  7307 Running Rope
                  Austin,TX 78731 USA
                  512-345-7219

                  From: Dana Visalli <dana@...>
                  To: Bee Monitoring <beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com>
                  Sent: Friday, October 12, 2012 10:34 AM
                  Subject: [beemonitoring] Agapostemon

                   
                   
                  I'd like to check in again with this Agapostemon:
                   
                  I found I had collected what is probably the same bee during the summer.
                   
                  Using 'Bees of Northwestern America: Agapostemon' which 'H' pointed out is a pdf online,
                  it looks like it has to be texanus or femoratus, range-wise-- as several people on this list
                  pointed out. 
                   
                  Here are the scutums of the two from that source, 13 is femoratus and 14-15 is texanus:
                   
                  and here is the best shot I've been able to get of my bee, beginning photography 101:
                   
                  Which one is it?  Seems like femoratus.
                   
                  Thanks,
                   
                  Dana


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