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Fwd: Revision of ID list for questions on ID help

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  • Nicholas Stewart
    Whenever I find I m IDing more uncommon & rare species than I d usually expect, or have documented in the previous two years of the same project (2010 and
    Message 1 of 1 , Sep 23, 2012
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      Whenever I find I'm IDing more uncommon & rare species than I'd usually expect, or have documented in the previous two years of the same project (2010 and 2011), @ identical sites, under identical protocols My Red Flags go up! Though, @ the same time I remember that year-to-year community variation, species turnover, & high new species/rare species singleton accounts are fundamental expectations in terrestrial arthropod assemblages! 

      So, here's a list of some of the taxa Ive identified which are either exceptionally rare, uncommon, or which don't traditionally range into my sample regions (new species accounts for GA) - If anyone has ANY insight into these specific bees, wishes to receive more info or pictures if the specimen (or would like it mailed to see in person), has found similar findings or knows what I could be doing wrong, etc -- PLEASE hit me up!!! Without further ado, here're the most notable ones I want some insight into:


      Cemolobus ipomoeae:
      **(3) total specimens now!!! Rare...pssh! Haha!**
      • 2011(1) MALE
      • 2012 (2) MALE & FEMALE

      Tetraloniella/Exomalopsis/Anthophorula: 
       Leaning toward Exomalopsis with leanings for Tetraloniella (if the species description called for a smaller female - roughly 3/4 size of Apis rather than = to >) , based upon wing venation, bee dimensions, tergal banding, floral host...
      • 2012 (5) FEMALES, (1) MALE

      Svastra atripes & S. obliqua caliginous: 
      POSITIVE on these two (bottle caught off Helianthus for , but interesting sign of the health of the local habitats nonetheless
      • 2012 (5) FEMALES, (3) MALES [S. atripes]
      • 2012 (4) FEMALES, (2) MALES [S. obliqua]

      Megachile sculpturalis: 
      Again, POSTIVE - but first sign of species in N GA since study onset in 2009! ZERO (0) of these  monsters collected every other year of study, w/ Identically intensive sampling...obviously, just moved into N GA!
      • 2012 (47) FEMALES, (39) MALES

      Melitoma grisella:  
      Aberrant finding, these gorgeous tan velvet bees key to both this Apid species, whose biogeographyMatch collection in N GA far better than Diadasia, though morphologically are much less an ideal candidate...HELP!!
      • 2012 (1) FEMALE

      Megachile bahamensis:
      Un-Confident whilst fairly sure after innemerable determinations over 2010-now, using mostly ALL my Megachilid keys (nearly 50) I probably have ID'd this poor bee to a 2nd-Death...
      • 2010 (1) MALE

      Megachile albitarsis:
      • 2010 (2) MALES

      Megachile parallella:
      Giant & gorgeous 
      • 2012 (1) FEMALE

      Diadasia (rincolis ??): 
      One (1) of three (3) bees from the same site, date, devise type & color (Blue Level Pans, July, Hillside Orchard) which ALL seem to be this bee?!! Supposedly, They are xeric Neartic Apids which are oligo-lectic specialist on a few Cactusaceae from the Desert Southwest, only breaching the US just within  AZ-NM-CA border...
      Genus shouldn't be West of OK using their furthest known range; that one species is the widest ranging & most promising morphological candidate D. rincolis - after dozens of determination rechecks with same genus ID for the MALE, & giving up on the FEMALES IDs I couldn't be THAT consistently mistaken...I hope...
      • 2012 (2) FEMALES, (1) MALE

      Osmia taurus:
      Didn't know this was a bee to look for in Eastern US study collections, due to its (??); rarity, an invasive, or something else that eludes me presently. Nonetheless, 2012 so far has one of these stout, non-to-lightly metallic dark-brown-to-black hairy giant (for most E. US Osmia, even O. (Osmia) sp.) with distinctive clypeal 'horns' that trump any those I've seen in the other O. (Osmia) sp. we have
      • 2012 (1) FEMALE

      Osmia abundance:
      • 2010 ("traditional" Apple Bloom, spanning ~ mid-April thru early-May) --Collected (8) bees of (5) species 
      • 2011 (with 3-week premature Apple Bloom, ~ end-March thru mid-April)--(47) bees from (6) species
      • 2012 (nearly 6-weeks early ~ early-March thru late-March)--(288) bees (out of ~1/2 of the 2012 raw field samples I've been able to analyze thus far!!!) Estimate prob. 600-1000 bees from this year, Belonging to 9 species to date with ???? ultimately!!


      Thanks in advance for any help y'all may provide!!
      --
      Nick Stewart



      MANAGING NATIVE POLLINATOR ABUNDANCE:
      Efforts in Sustainable Native Pollination Services 

      Nicholas Glynn Stewart
      -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
         Project Designer, Lead Researcher, Primary Taxonomist  
      1000 University Center Lane
      Lawrenceville, GA 30043




      --



      MANAGING NATIVE POLLINATOR ABUNDANCE:
      Efforts in Sustainable Native Pollination Services 

      Nicholas Glynn Stewart
      -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
         Project Designer, Lead Researcher, Primary Taxonomist  
      1000 University Center Lane
      Lawrenceville, GA 30043

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