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An intriguing Anthophorula story

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  • Sam Droege
    All: While looking at Anthophorula specimens in the Smithsonian Natural History Museum, I came across 2 specimens collected from Virginia. This was
    Message 1 of 3 , Mar 7, 2008
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      All:

      While looking at Anthophorula specimens in the Smithsonian Natural History Museum, I came across 2 specimens collected from Virginia.  This was interesting as the nearest known previous collections were in Indiana (A. asteris) and Mississippi (A. micheneri).  

      Pictures of  these specimens are up at:  

      http://tech.ph.groups.yahoo.com/group/beemonitoring/photos/
      (note that one specimen has no hind legs and the abdomen has been glued back on)

      These specimens were collected by Dr. Richard Duffield (Howard University, D.C.) who collected them on the 10th of October in 1983 on the vast Qauntico Marine Base.  The specimens were collected off of Gerardia setacea (now Agalinis setacea) and the specimens were originally identified by George Eickwort as Exomalopsis micheneri (the name was later changed to Anthophorula micheneri).   The Smithsonian also had a specimen from Mississippi of A. micheneri that was collected on the 14th of October, 1944 in Hattiesburg by Charles Michener and was a match to these specimens.  Michener’s article on the bees he collected around Hattiesburg, MS in 1944-1945 gives dates for this species from September 24-October 24 and all were collected off of A. purpurea.  Interestingly, the specimen at the Smithsonian from Falfurrias, TX in the same box (1907 – date not otherwise discernable) is fairly clearly not this species.

      So this is very interesting.  Perhaps people need to look more closely at Agalinis (Gerardia) populations in the future to see if this species is around.  I think we often taper off our collecting in October.  Agalinis is an eastern plant occurring from the Great Plains eastward.  A. setacea is an uncommon species (at least in the Mid-Atlantic area).  I have collected off Agalinis plants in the past (Agalinis purpurea) and haven’t run into this species, but perhaps a greater effort need be made.  Because this species has been recorded only a few times (does anyone have any records from Mississippi after 1944?) it should be thought of as a species of concern.  

      sam

                                                     
      Sam Droege  Sam_Droege@...                      
      w 301-497-5840 h 301-390-7759 fax 301-497-5624
      USGS Patuxent Wildlife Research Center
      BARC-EAST, BLDG 308, RM 124 10300 Balt. Ave., Beltsville, MD  20705
      Http://www.pwrc.usgs.gov


      The rose of Sharon
      Bloomed by the roadside:
      A horse ate the flowers.


           -Basho
    • Jack Neff
      Sam: In roughly 30 years of following bees at the Brackenridge Field Lab, I encountered Anthophorula micheneri only once (actually multiple instances one year
      Message 2 of 3 , Mar 7, 2008
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        Sam: In roughly 30 years of following bees at the
        Brackenridge Field Lab, I encountered Anthophorula
        micheneri only once (actually multiple instances one
        year on Agalinis heterophylla). It was quite a
        surprise since I'd seen only one other Texas record
        (not your Falfurrias bee) and previously we had a
        student who worked on Agalinis pollination at BFL who
        never encountered the thing. I haven't seen it since
        despite repeated searchs. With an appearance in
        Virginia it seems to be a curiously widespread but
        elusive bee.

        Jack
        --- Sam Droege <sdroege@...> wrote:

        > All:
        >
        > While looking at Anthophorula specimens in the
        > Smithsonian Natural History
        > Museum, I came across 2 specimens collected from
        > Virginia. This was
        > interesting as the nearest known previous
        > collections were in Indiana (A.
        > asteris) and Mississippi (A. micheneri).
        >
        > Pictures of these specimens are up at:
        >
        >
        http://tech.ph.groups.yahoo.com/group/beemonitoring/photos/
        > (note that one specimen has no hind legs and the
        > abdomen has been glued
        > back on)
        >
        > These specimens were collected by Dr. Richard
        > Duffield (Howard University,
        > D.C.) who collected them on the 10th of October in
        > 1983 on the vast
        > Qauntico Marine Base. The specimens were collected
        > off of Gerardia
        > setacea (now Agalinis setacea) and the specimens
        > were originally
        > identified by George Eickwort as Exomalopsis
        > micheneri (the name was later
        > changed to Anthophorula micheneri). The
        > Smithsonian also had a specimen
        > from Mississippi of A. micheneri that was collected
        > on the 14th of
        > October, 1944 in Hattiesburg by Charles Michener and
        > was a match to these
        > specimens. Michener?s article on the bees he
        > collected around
        > Hattiesburg, MS in 1944-1945 gives dates for this
        > species from September
        > 24-October 24 and all were collected off of A.
        > purpurea. Interestingly,
        > the specimen at the Smithsonian from Falfurrias, TX
        > in the same box (1907
        > ? date not otherwise discernable) is fairly clearly
        > not this species.
        >
        > So this is very interesting. Perhaps people need to
        > look more closely at
        > Agalinis (Gerardia) populations in the future to see
        > if this species is
        > around. I think we often taper off our collecting
        > in October. Agalinis
        > is an eastern plant occurring from the Great Plains
        > eastward. A. setacea
        > is an uncommon species (at least in the Mid-Atlantic
        > area). I have
        > collected off Agalinis plants in the past (Agalinis
        > purpurea) and haven?t
        > run into this species, but perhaps a greater effort
        > need be made. Because
        > this species has been recorded only a few times
        > (does anyone have any
        > records from Mississippi after 1944?) it should be
        > thought of as a species
        > of concern.
        >
        > sam
        >
        >
        > Sam Droege Sam_Droege@...
        > w 301-497-5840 h 301-390-7759 fax 301-497-5624
        > USGS Patuxent Wildlife Research Center
        > BARC-EAST, BLDG 308, RM 124 10300 Balt. Ave.,
        > Beltsville, MD 20705
        > Http://www.pwrc.usgs.gov
        >
        > The rose of Sharon
        > Bloomed by the roadside:
        > A horse ate the flowers.
        >
        > -Basho


        John L. Neff
        Central Texas Melittological Institute
        7307 Running Rope
        Austin,TX 78731 USA
        512-345-7219


        ____________________________________________________________________________________
        Looking for last minute shopping deals?
        Find them fast with Yahoo! Search. http://tools.search.yahoo.com/newsearch/category.php?category=shopping
      • Sam Droege
        Jack: That s very interesting, as all the other records that I could find on the KU database were central Texas and I wasn t quite sure what to make of them.
        Message 3 of 3 , Mar 7, 2008
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          Jack:

          That's very interesting, as all the other records that I could find on the KU database were central Texas and I wasn't quite sure what to make of them.  I will have to remind people to look for this bad boy this fall....there is an awful lot of Agalinis between here and Mississippi to look at.

          sam

                                                         
          Sam Droege  Sam_Droege@...                      
          w 301-497-5840 h 301-390-7759 fax 301-497-5624
          USGS Patuxent Wildlife Research Center
          BARC-EAST, BLDG 308, RM 124 10300 Balt. Ave., Beltsville, MD  20705
          Http://www.pwrc.usgs.gov


           Oh! I sigh for the land of the cypress and pine,
          Of the laurel, the rose, and the gay woodbine,
          Where the long, gray moss decks the rugged oak tree, -
          That sun-bright land is the land for me.
            - Samuel Dickson



          Jack Neff <jlnatctmi@...>
          Sent by: beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com

          03/07/2008 05:29 PM

          Please respond to
          beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com

          To
          beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com
          cc
          Subject
          Re: [beemonitoring] An intriguing Anthophorula story





          Sam: In roughly 30 years of following bees at the
          Brackenridge Field Lab, I encountered Anthophorula
          micheneri only once (actually multiple instances one
          year on Agalinis heterophylla). It was quite a
          surprise since I'd seen only one other Texas record
          (not your Falfurrias bee) and previously we had a
          student who worked on Agalinis pollination at BFL who
          never encountered the thing. I haven't seen it since
          despite repeated searchs. With an appearance in
          Virginia it seems to be a curiously widespread but
          elusive bee.

          Jack
          --- Sam Droege <
          sdroege@...> wrote:

          > All:
          >
          > While looking at Anthophorula specimens in the
          > Smithsonian Natural History
          > Museum, I came across 2 specimens collected from
          > Virginia. This was
          > interesting as the nearest known previous
          > collections were in Indiana (A.
          > asteris) and Mississippi (A. micheneri).
          >
          > Pictures of these specimens are up at:
          >
          >

          http://tech.ph.groups.yahoo.com/group/beemonitoring/photos/
          > (note that one specimen has no hind legs and the
          > abdomen has been glued
          > back on)
          >
          > These specimens were collected by Dr. Richard
          > Duffield (Howard University,
          > D.C.) who collected them on the 10th of October in
          > 1983 on the vast
          > Qauntico Marine Base. The specimens were collected
          > off of Gerardia
          > setacea (now Agalinis setacea) and the specimens
          > were originally
          > identified by George Eickwort as Exomalopsis
          > micheneri (the name was later
          > changed to Anthophorula micheneri). The
          > Smithsonian also had a specimen
          > from Mississippi of A. micheneri that was collected
          > on the 14th of
          > October, 1944 in Hattiesburg by Charles Michener and
          > was a match to these
          > specimens. Michener?s article on the bees he
          > collected around
          > Hattiesburg, MS in 1944-1945 gives dates for this
          > species from September
          > 24-October 24 and all were collected off of A.
          > purpurea. Interestingly,
          > the specimen at the Smithsonian from Falfurrias, TX
          > in the same box (1907
          > ? date not otherwise discernable) is fairly clearly
          > not this species.
          >
          > So this is very interesting. Perhaps people need to
          > look more closely at
          > Agalinis (Gerardia) populations in the future to see
          > if this species is
          > around. I think we often taper off our collecting
          > in October. Agalinis
          > is an eastern plant occurring from the Great Plains
          > eastward. A. setacea
          > is an uncommon species (at least in the Mid-Atlantic
          > area). I have
          > collected off Agalinis plants in the past (Agalinis
          > purpurea) and haven?t
          > run into this species, but perhaps a greater effort
          > need be made. Because
          > this species has been recorded only a few times
          > (does anyone have any
          > records from Mississippi after 1944?) it should be
          > thought of as a species
          > of concern.
          >
          > sam
          >
          >
          > Sam Droege
          Sam_Droege@...
          > w 301-497-5840 h 301-390-7759 fax 301-497-5624
          > USGS Patuxent Wildlife Research Center
          > BARC-EAST, BLDG 308, RM 124 10300 Balt. Ave.,
          > Beltsville, MD 20705
          >
          Http://www.pwrc.usgs.gov
          >
          > The rose of Sharon
          > Bloomed by the roadside:
          > A horse ate the flowers.
          >
          > -Basho

          John L. Neff
          Central Texas Melittological Institute
          7307 Running Rope
          Austin,TX 78731 USA
          512-345-7219

          __________________________________________________________
          Looking for last minute shopping deals?
          Find them fast with Yahoo! Search.
          http://tools.search.yahoo.com/newsearch/category.php?category=shopping


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