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Re: [beemonitoring] A presentation on Lithurgus crysurus

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  • Jack Neff
    Lithurgus chrysurus is a carpenter bee in the sense that, like most Xylocopa spp., it excavates its nests in wood (although wood boring bee would probably be
    Message 1 of 44 , Sep 5, 2012
      Lithurgus chrysurus is a carpenter bee in the sense that, like most Xylocopa spp., it excavates its nests in wood (although wood boring bee would probably be more accurate since what they do has little to do with carpentry).  However, that was not the reason for my comment.  To reiterate, the term carpenter bee has long been used as a common name for various Xylocopa species.  In fact, "carpenter bee" is the registered common name of Xylocopa virginica in the American Entomological Society's list of "official" common names.  Loosely using carpenter bee for an unrelated group is only likely to sew confusion.  Abandoning traditional definitions, we might as well start calling all the various other megachilids and halictids which excavate their nests in wood carpenter bees as well.  Carpenter bee is one of our few well established common names for a narrowly defined group of bees (with honey bee, bumble bee, leafcutter bee).  Why mess things up.

      best

      Jack 
       
      John L. Neff
      Central Texas Melittological Institute
      7307 Running Rope
      Austin,TX 78731 US and
      512-345-7219

      From: Brian Dykstra <brianjdykstra@...>
      To: Jack Neff <jlnatctmi@...>; Anita M. Collins <frozenbeedoc@...>; "beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com" <beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Wednesday, September 5, 2012 2:25 AM
      Subject: Re: [beemonitoring] A presentation on Lithurgus crysurus

      More on Lithurgus:
       "O'Toole and Raw (2004) described Lithurgus as megachilid "carpenter" bees.  They do not cut leaf pieces like ohters of the family, rather they make holes in tree branches."(Hannan and Maeta 2007).  The article goes on to say that Lithurgus collaris seals completed nests with wood dust. The quote above refers to the book 'Bees of the World' by O'Toole and Raw (2004).

      Nesting Biology and the Nest Architecture of Lithurgus (Lithurgus) collaris Smith (Hymenoptera: Megachilidae) on Iriomote Island, Southwestern Subtropical Archipelago, Japan

      Md. Abdul Hannan and Yasuo Maeta
      Journal of the Kansas Entomological Society
      Vol. 80, No. 3 (Jul., 2007), pp. 213-222
      Published by: Kansas (Central States) Entomological Society
      Article Stable URL:http://www.jstor.org/stable/25086383

      On Tue, Sep 4, 2012 at 6:42 AM, Jack Neff <jlnatctmi@...> wrote:
       
      Anita:  I think using the term "carpenter bee" as a common name for a Lithurgus is unfortunate as that common name has, for many years, been rather firmly been attached to Xylocopa.  Made up common names often add to identity confusion rather than clarifying things and think this does that just that.

      best

      Jack
       
      John L. Neff
      Central Texas Melittological Institute
      7307 Running Rope
      Austin,TX 78731 USA
      512-345-7219

      From: Anita M. Collins <frozenbeedoc@...>
      To: beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Monday, September 3, 2012 1:58 PM
      Subject: [beemonitoring] A presentation on Lithurgus crysurus

       
       Recently we found a nest site for this exotic carpenter bee.  At Sam's urging I am posting a PowerPoint at www.slideshare.net/anitacollins1806.  Take a look at the aggregate nest site, an opened nest, and the background on this bee in PA.
       If you use the photos, please acknowledge Lehigh Gap Nature Center.  This is a unique nature center established by volunteers on a Super Fund Site. 
       
      Anita Collins
       
      If we knew what we were doing, it wouldn't be called research.
      Albert Einstein





    • Brian Dykstra
      Visit this Utah State University extension website to participate in coming up with common names for native bees http://extension.usu.edu/aitc/bees/name.htm
      Message 44 of 44 , Sep 24, 2012
        Visit this Utah State University extension website to participate in coming up with common names for native bees


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