Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Rosewater Won't Work

Expand Messages
  • Peter Bernhardt
    Bottles sold as rose, orange blossom, jasmine or lavender water must not be used as nectar substitutes as they do not contain appreciable amounts of flower
    Message 1 of 1 , Sep 5, 2012
    • 0 Attachment
      Bottles sold as rose, orange blossom, jasmine or lavender water must not be used as nectar "substitutes" as they do not contain appreciable amounts of flower nectar.  Depending on the scented "water" they are produced` by placing fresh flowers (and sometimes leaves and stems) in temperature controlled, cauldrons that drive off the scent molecules using steam distillation.  The distilled steam becomes the scented water and glycerol may be added to "fix" the scents in the water.  Nectar sugars and most amino acids have a far higher boiling point than scent molecules so you can't expect to find a heavy concentration of nutrients in a floral water.  In fact, roses do NOT secrete floral nectar at all. 

      We need to make a point that floral odors and floral nectar are usually produced by two different sets of glands in the same flower.  The scents secreted by a scent gland (osmophore) often "contaminate" nectar droplets inside a flower and that gives commercial honey its wonderful range of odors and tastes.  However, most foraging insects discriminate between nectar (edible) and scent (inedible) and do not ingest or deliberately collect scent (unless they are male euglossine bees, for example).   

      On the other hand, floral waters might be used to scent artificial flowers, colored tubes or even small, shallow, dishes filled with artificial or real nectar.  Perhaps they could be used to attract mosquitos to feeding sites in captivity.  Are there publications of experiments to show which floral scents attract mosquitos?

      Peter Bernhardt
    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.