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Re: [beemonitoring] Sources for Plant Nectar

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  • Jack Neff
    Obtaining sufficient floral nectar for experiments with mosquitos will probably be difficult.  Nectar composition varies widely and the plants that produce
    Message 1 of 4 , Sep 4 8:34 AM
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      Obtaining sufficient floral nectar for experiments with mosquitos will probably be difficult.  Nectar composition varies widely and the plants that produce large, relatively easily collectible amounts of nectar are mainly bird or bat pollinated and not the kind of things mosquitos would be likely to be visiting.  One might have some luck  using centrifuge techniques to collect siognificant volumes of nectar from flowers with very small amounts of nectar (sub microliter).  Dafni et al, 2005 " Practical Pollination Biology",  Enviroquest , Ltd and Kearns and Inouye, 1993 "Techniques for Pollination Biologists", University of California Press, cover various nectar collection techniques including centrifugation.

      best

      Jack
       
      John L. Neff
      Central Texas Melittological Institute
      7307 Running Rope
      Austin,TX 78731 USA
      512-345-7219

      From: Sam Droege <sdroege@...>
      To: Dr. Roger Seeber <seeberrg@...>; beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com
      Cc: Joseph Horzempa <joseph.horzempa@...>
      Sent: Tuesday, September 4, 2012 10:08 AM
      Subject: [beemonitoring] Sources for Plant Nectar

       
      All:

      I have been contacted by a mosquito researcher (see email correspondence below) regarding the availability of plant nectars for feeding mosquitos.  They have used artificial solutions in the past, but are interested in the possibility of obtaining real nectar.  I am not sure such things are available so if anyone knows they can send a message to the requesters (copied), but I think the topic is of general enough interest to send to the whole list (beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com) so please do.  I would also suppose their might be enough differences in plant nectars that the choice of nectar could be significant...sounds like a meaty discussion to me.

      Thanks
      sam

                                                    
      Sam Droege  sdroege@...                     
      w 301-497-5840 h 301-390-7759 fax 301-497-5624
      USGS Patuxent Wildlife Research Center
      BARC-EAST, BLDG 308, RM 124 10300 Balt. Ave., Beltsville, MD  20705
      Http://www.pwrc.usgs.gov
                                                    
      The mosquito was heard to complain
      That the Chemist had poisoned his brain
      The cause of his sorrow
      Was paradichloro-
      Diphenyltrichloroethane
        -Unknown




      From:"Dr. Roger Seeber" <seeberrg@...>
      To:Sam Droege <sdroege@...>
      Cc:Joseph Horzempa <joseph.horzempa@...>
      Date:09/04/2012 10:38 AM
      Subject:Re: help





      Sam,

      It looks like it really doesn't matter.  We are working on the sugar feeding of Mosquitos
      and after a much harder time then I thought it would be I find that they are generalists according to
      the info I got from Ohio State.  We can use artificial mixes but it would really be much more
      convincing to me if we could get the "real" thing.  So I would say any plant that might grow
      locally.
      thanks for your efforts.
      Roger

      Sam Droege wrote:

      Hi Roger

      I don't know myself, but I run a large listerv with all sorts of people who can answer that question.


      Can you tell me what species or groups of species of plants you would like nectar for and would it will be use for?  That would help narrow the answer's down.


      sam





      From: "Dr. Roger Seeber" <seeberrg@...>
      To: sdroege@...
      Date: 09/04/2012 09:30 AM
      Subject: help






      Mr. Droege,

      I got your contact info from Penny Miller of the Good zoo in response to
      a question I posed to her.
      I am Roger Seeber, a Biology professor at West Liberty Univ. near
      Wheeling WV.
      Myself and another professor here are looking into working on mosquito
      research
      and I was wondering if there was any place that you couild order
      extracted plant nectar.
      Not the man made stuff that you find on the internet.
      I have no idea if this is even possible to gather but I thought I would ask.
      Any advice would be great.
      Thanks

      Roger







    • Cane, Jim
      Jack is right, I would not want to hand collect enough nectar for feeding for most plants. If you resort to centrifugation, keep the RPMs down, as I found
      Message 2 of 4 , Sep 4 1:26 PM
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        Jack is right, I would not want to hand collect enough nectar for feeding for most plants.  If you resort to centrifugation, keep the RPMs down, as I found with alfalfa buds that you can also extract phloem sap!  If I were to manually collect nectar from one readily available plant, it would be a summer squash, esp zucchini.  Each flower has a veritable lake of nectar in it (up to 120 ul) that is readily removed with a syringe (ideally with a blunt-tipped one).  Mature buds can be bagged the night before so you aren’t competing with bees early the next morning.  If you live in a place where bat-pollinated flowers can be grown or grow, then there are some other options like this (e.g. agave and some bat-pollinated vines).  But for sheer convenience, squash.

         

        yours

         

        Jim

         

        ===============================

        James H. Cane

        USDA-ARS Bee Biology and Systematics Lab

        Utah State University, Logan, UT 84322 USA

        tel: 435-797-3879   FAX: 435-797-0461

        email: Jim.Cane@... 

        web page: www.ars.usda.gov/npa/beelab

        publications: http://digitalcommons.usu.edu/piru/

         





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      • David Inouye
        I have a database with a list of species of flowers from which mosquitoes have been recorded, if that s of use. David At 09:08 AM 9/4/2012, you wrote: All: I
        Message 3 of 4 , Sep 4 3:01 PM
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          I have a database with a list of species of flowers from which mosquitoes have been recorded, if that's of use.

          David

          At 09:08 AM 9/4/2012, you wrote:
           

          All:

          I have been contacted by a mosquito researcher (see email correspondence below) regarding the availability of plant nectars for feeding mosquitos.  They have used artificial solutions in the past, but are interested in the possibility of obtaining real nectar.  I am not sure such things are available so if anyone knows they can send a message to the requesters (copied), but I think the topic is of general enough interest to send to the whole list (beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com) so please do.  I would also suppose their might be enough differences in plant nectars that the choice of nectar could be significant...sounds like a meaty discussion to me.

          Thanks
          sam

                                                       
          Sam Droege  sdroege@...                    
          w 301-497-5840 h 301-390-7759 fax 301-497-5624
          USGS Patuxent Wildlife Research Center
          BARC-EAST, BLDG 308, RM 124 10300 Balt. Ave., Beltsville, MD  20705
          Http://www.pwrc.usgs.gov
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