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RE: [beemonitoring] method/device for volunteers to capture bees from specific flowers

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  • barbara.abraham@hamptonu.edu
    Dave, We use BioQuip plastic tubes #8915 15 dram 1 1/8 x 3 1/4 or #8912 12 dram 1 1/8 x 2 5/8 with snap tops. I am sure the large diameter helps. I have
    Message 1 of 5 , May 10, 2012
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      Dave,

       

      We use BioQuip plastic tubes #8915 15 dram 1 1/8” x 3 1/4” or #8912 12 dram 1 1/8” x 2 5/8” with snap tops. I am sure the large diameter helps. I have been happy with our capture rate (once the students learn how), but really have no idea what it is.  I think we do get most. The reason I use this method is to preserve the plants. Naïve students also have trouble with nets and do destroy many plants! And yes –NO stings so far (fingers crossed).

       

      You could also try an aspirator for the tiniest bees…or I am sure Sam has a home-made bee vac!

       

      Barb

       

      Barbara J. Abraham, Ph.D.

      Associate Professor

      SEEDS Ecology Chapter Advisor

      Department of Biological Sciences

      Hampton University

      Hampton, VA  23668

      757-727-5283

      barbara.abraham@...

       

      From: beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com [mailto:beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of david almquist
      Sent: Wednesday, May 09, 2012 9:11 PM
      To: beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: RE: [beemonitoring] method/device for volunteers to capture bees from specific flowers

       

       

      Interesting and thank you very much.  I'm surprised at the lack of stings over that much time and with that many students and specimens.  Do you have any idea of a ballpark percentage capture rate as far as effectiveness?  The reason that I'm asking is that I'm allright with a net, although that usually messes up the flower and/or plant, but when I've tried to use vials, my success rate has been relatively low, usually from scaring off the specimen before getting close enough and/or failing to actually get the specimen into the vial.  Also, what size snap caps do you use?
       
      Thanks again
       
      Dave 
       
       


      To: daidunno@...; beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com
      From: barbara.abraham@...
      Date: Wed, 9 May 2012 21:06:51 +0000
      Subject: RE: [beemonitoring] method/device for volunteers to capture bees from specific flowers

       

      David,

       

      I have been using plastic vials with snap-tops – putting the vial open end down over the bee and as it flies upward (or stays on the flower) snapping on the top from underneath. This works well with naïve students. I have been using the method for two summers and the five students and I who have been using the method have not been stung – even by bumblebees.  We have collected over 800 bees using this method, and the flowers aren’t usually harmed.

       

      Barb

       

      Barbara J. Abraham, Ph.D.

      Associate Professor

      SEEDS Ecology Chapter Advisor

      Department of Biological Sciences

      Hampton University

      Hampton, VA  23668

      757-727-5283

      barbara.abraham@...

       

      From: beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com [mailto:beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of david almquist
      Sent: Wednesday, May 09, 2012 4:43 PM
      To: beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: [beemonitoring] method/device for volunteers to capture bees from specific flowers

       

       

      I may try to have some volunteers, including field botanists and biologists but no entomologists, attempt to collect bees off of flowers of particular species.  I need to come up with something that will allow them to capture the bees from the specific flowers without much chance of their getting stung and then transfer the specimens to some sort of container, kill jar or similar.  I'd also like to have them do as little damage to the flowers as possible, as some of them are rare.
       
      So far, I think that my options are:
       
      small bee vacuums
      baggies and kill jars
      nets
      something that I can't recall the name of, but that looked like tongs or scissors with two small strainers attached to it or a strainer on one side and a "lid" on the other
       
      If anyone has any experience with, or thoughts on, non-entomologist volunteers using any of these techniques, I'd love to hear about it.
       
      Thanks
       
      Dave

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