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Re: [beemonitoring] ID?

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  • Leo Shapiro
    Now there s an excellent question, especially since this was not a century ago, before biologists knew any better!
    Message 1 of 10 , Apr 22, 2012
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      Now there's an excellent question, especially since this was not a century ago, before biologists knew any better!

      On Apr 22, 2012, at 12:33 AM, david almquist wrote:


      Introduced why?
       

      To: inouye@...; beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com
      From: ascher@...
      Date: Sat, 21 Apr 2012 20:05:06 +0000
      Subject: RE: [beemonitoring] ID?

       

      I think it's an Anthophora plumipes female, one of the exotic species introduced by Suzanne Batra et al. of the USDA.

      John





    • Leo Shapiro
      I have a little colony with nests in the ground in a large space (open on two sides but heavily shaded) under my house in MD, just a few miles from where, I
      Message 2 of 10 , Apr 22, 2012
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        I have a little colony with nests in the ground in a large space (open on two sides but heavily shaded) under my house in MD, just a few miles from where, I suspect, they were originally released (Beltsville?). I have never seen a black one. 

        Sam, why not get hold of some Japanese, MD, and European samples and have a look at their DNA? Or has this been done?

        Leo


        On Apr 21, 2012, at 10:06 PM, Sam Droege wrote:

        All: 

        Indeed it is A. plumipes...and they are not  black like many of the European/British individuals.  Their point of origin was Japan where they are lighter and were initially called A. pilipes.   Likely they should be split back to their original names.  This species is now quite common in the D.C. area and populations are growing rapidly.  At my house they have managed to build numerous nests in the mud walls of my house.,   

        Note that there are no records for Philadelphia or Baltimore yet! 

        sam 

        Sam Droege  sdroege@...                      
        w 301-497-5840 h 301-390-7759 fax 301-497-5624
        USGS Patuxent Wildlife Research Center
        BARC-EAST, BLDG 308, RM 124 10300 Balt. Ave., Beltsville, MD  20705
        Http://www.pwrc.usgs.gov

        The frog in the well knows nothing of the great ocean.
          -Japanese Proverb




        From:David Inouye <inouye@...>
        To:John Ascher <ascher@...>, "beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com" <beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com>
        Date:04/21/2012 05:11 PM
        Subject:RE: [beemonitoring] ID?
        Sent by:beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com





         

        Thanks John (and Doug).  For what it's worth, Wikipedia says that females can be black or brown.  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anthophora_plumipes

        At 04:05 PM 4/21/2012, John Ascher wrote:

        I think it's an Anthophora plumipes female, one of the exotic species introduced by Suzanne Batra et al. of the USDA.

        John



        From: beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com [beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com] on behalf of David Inouye [inouye@...]
        Sent:
         Saturday, April 21, 2012 3:00 PM
        To:
         beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com
        Subject:
         [beemonitoring] ID?


         

        A gardener sent this photo, taken in Maryland.  Know what it is?  Looks like it has some spider web or something like that on a wing. 

        <mime-attachment.jpeg> 




      • Doug Yanega
        John et al.: Is it possible the bee in David s photo is Anthophora furcata? The thoracic coloration of furcata, I noticed, matches the photo a bit better, in
        Message 3 of 10 , Apr 23, 2012
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          John et al.:

          Is it possible the bee in David's photo is Anthophora furcata? The
          thoracic coloration of furcata, I noticed, matches the photo a bit
          better, in having pale hairs at the front and back edges, and the
          pale facial hairs wouldn't be visible from the angle in David's photo:

          http://www.biology.ualberta.ca/bsc/ejournal/pgs_03/pgs_03.html

          http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7156/6522038695_f8378965ce_z.jpg
          --

          Doug Yanega Dept. of Entomology Entomology Research Museum
          Univ. of California, Riverside, CA 92521-0314 skype: dyanega
          phone: (951) 827-4315 (standard disclaimer: opinions are mine, not UCR's)
          http://cache.ucr.edu/~heraty/yanega.html
          "There are some enterprises in which a careful disorderliness
          is the true method" - Herman Melville, Moby Dick, Chap. 82
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