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Re: [beemonitoring] Ceratina dupla vs. Ceratina calcarata females

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  • John S. Ascher
    FYI, I wasn t intending to reply to this whole list but only to Sam. ... -- John S. Ascher, Ph.D. Bee Database Project Manager Division of Invertebrate Zoology
    Message 1 of 3 , Aug 18, 2006
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      FYI, I wasn't intending to reply to this whole list but only to Sam.


      >
      > Sam:
      >
      > Are you sure this applies to all populations (e.g., dupla floridana)?
      >
      > I wasn't confident in the characters on the poster by the Canadians. The
      > punctures seemed to vary a lot.
      >
      > On another subject, I find it easy to distinguish Megachile brevis vs.
      > mendica and question their being indistinguishable. I find Mitchell's
      > characters of the tergal apex useful and rarely have problems. I can even
      > tell texana vs. mendica most of the time, although some specimens are
      > genuinely puzzling.
      >
      > John
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >> Given the prevalance of these two species, I thought it worth sending
      >> out
      >> a quick note about discriminating the females. Expanding on Sandra
      >> Rehan
      >> work on discriminating Ceratina dupla from C. calcarata I recently found
      >> another character that will help separate the two, this requires more
      >> experience but is useful for discriminating inbetween specimens.
      >>
      >> I have added the following to the Ceratina guide:
      >>
      >> With experience and a good series of both species the propodeal triangle
      >> can be used to discriminate among ambiguous specimens. In dupla the
      >> basal
      >> striations extend usually rather uniformly about two-thirds of the way
      >> to
      >> edge across the entire width, these striations are usually dense enough
      >> that it is difficult to discriminate individual members. In calcarata
      >> the
      >> basal striations extend about two-thirds or more of the way in the
      >> center
      >> but this proportion decreases to the sides, thus leaving a non-uniform,
      >> unstriated portion of the rim of the triangle; the striations can be
      >> more
      >> widely spaced and usually are clearly separable from their neighbors,
      >> additionally the entire triangle tends to be longer in comparison to
      >> dupla.
      >
      >
      > --
      > John S. Ascher, Ph.D.
      > Bee Database Project Manager
      > Division of Invertebrate Zoology
      > American Museum of Natural History
      > Central Park West @ 79th St.
      > New York, NY 10024-5192
      > work phone: 212-496-3447
      > mobile phone: 917-407-0378
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > Yahoo! Groups Links
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >


      --
      John S. Ascher, Ph.D.
      Bee Database Project Manager
      Division of Invertebrate Zoology
      American Museum of Natural History
      Central Park West @ 79th St.
      New York, NY 10024-5192
      work phone: 212-496-3447
      mobile phone: 917-407-0378
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