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Fwd: May Gibbs online story now started on State Library of NSW website

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  • Peter Bernhardt
    Dear Colleagues: The State Library of New South Wales, Australia) is in the process of digitizing the illustrations of children s author and cartoonist, May
    Message 1 of 4 , Mar 16, 2012
      Dear Colleagues:

      The State Library of New South Wales, Australia) is in the process of digitizing the illustrations of children's author and cartoonist, May Gibbs (1877-1969).  

      http://www.sl.nsw.gov.au/discover_collections/society_art/gibbs/index.html

      Although she was born in Kent, May Gibbs lived most of her life in Western Australia and in new South Wales.  The main characters in her stores are anthropomorphic flowers and fruits based on genera native to Australia (Eucalyptus, Acacia, Banksia, Boronia etc.).  What may be of particular interest to educators in the northern hemisphere is that she had a keen eye for the insects found on leaves and flowers.  Entomologists have been able to identify illustrations of her beetles and ants down to genus.  This includes the cases made by bag worm moths (go to link). 
       
      The state library has received most of the funds to digitize all her illustrations so this link should grow and grow.  I have one of her books in which a gumnut baby rides a bee and suddenly realized it was Amegilla bombiformis.  One wonders if our organizations should become involved in an illustrative project that would make anthophilous insects more accessible (and less menacing) to children?

      Sincerely, Peter Bernhardt


    • Charles Guevara
         Hi all, for what it is worth, I enjoy this forums energy and shared experiences.  I have been out in rural central NY/fingerlakes region. for two years
      Message 2 of 4 , Mar 18, 2012

           Hi all, for what it is worth, I enjoy this forums energy and shared experiences.  I have been out in rural central NY/fingerlakes region. for two years now..specifically today: 3/18/12 here in a farmfield in Weedsport,NY/fingerlakes region..at about 5:pm, while on a hike with my dog...I first noticed a large 'bumbel-bee'.  the crocuses flowers 'opened' last week, robin-redbreasts (Turdus migratorious ?) first appeared on 3/7/12.
         
           I attempted to use my point&shoot camera to image capture this large Bombus species...but it aggressively flew off the ground level plants it was searching ( no flowers in this large foder-crop field )...it began to fly about me at head level for three rotations, then it flew up to a great height and left the field my dog and I were traversing.
         
           Three days ago, when I uplifted a dense-tree canopy moulding tree limb, there was a quite sombulent metalic-green 'small bee' nestled  in the soil beneath the rotting tree segment. 
         
           I wonder if records are kept for first appearance of : 'Bumbel-bees'?  charlie guevara
        From: Peter Bernhardt <bernhap2@...>
        To: Bee United <beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com>; pollinator@...; Pollinator List-serv <pollinator@...>; Kyra N. Krakos <knkrakos@...>; irenejohnpalmer <irenejohnpalmer@...>
        Sent: Friday, March 16, 2012 10:30 AM
        Subject: [beemonitoring] Fwd: May Gibbs online story now started on State Library of NSW website



        Dear Colleagues:

        The State Library of New South Wales, Australia) is in the process of digitizing the illustrations of children's author and cartoonist, May Gibbs (1877-1969).  

        http://www.sl.nsw.gov.au/discover_collections/society_art/gibbs/index.html

        Although she was born in Kent, May Gibbs lived most of her life in Western Australia and in new South Wales.  The main characters in her stores are anthropomorphic flowers and fruits based on genera native to Australia (Eucalyptus, Acacia, Banksia, Boronia etc.).  What may be of particular interest to educators in the northern hemisphere is that she had a keen eye for the insects found on leaves and flowers.  Entomologists have been able to identify illustrations of her beetles and ants down to genus.  This includes the cases made by bag worm moths (go to link). 
         
        The state library has received most of the funds to digitize all her illustrations so this link should grow and grow.  I have one of her books in which a gumnut baby rides a bee and suddenly realized it was Amegilla bombiformis.  One wonders if our organizations should become involved in an illustrative project that would make anthophilous insects more accessible (and less menacing) to children?

        Sincerely, Peter Bernhardt






      • Liz Day
        ... now..specifically today: 3/18/12 here in a farmfield in Weedsport,NY/fingerlakes region..at about 5:pm, while on a hike with my dog...I first noticed a
        Message 3 of 4 , Mar 19, 2012
          > rural central NY/fingerlakes region. for two years
          now..specifically today: 3/18/12 here in a farmfield in
          Weedsport,NY/fingerlakes region..at about 5:pm, while on a hike with
          my dog...I first noticed a large 'bumbel-bee'. ..

          > I attempted to use my point&shoot camera to image capture this
          large Bombus species...but it aggressively flew off the ground level
          plants it was searching ( no flowers in this large foder-crop field
          )...it began to fly about me at head level for three rotations, then
          it flew up to a great height and left the field....

          Among the first species to come out are bimaculatus and terricola (if
          present)..... I don't know dates for your area, so these may have
          already emerged and you may be seeing something else... photos are
          needed for ID. Here in Indiana, Xylocopa are also out. They're big.

          I had always thought that that "approach&circle" (or flying back and
          forth) behavior was simply the bee looking to see what you are;
          perhaps your clothing colors suggest a possible flower, or maybe it
          is wondering if you're a threat...
          thoughts anyone?

          Liz Day
          Indianapolis IN USA
        • David Inouye
          That behavior sounds like Xylocopa to me. David ... now..specifically today: 3/18/12 here in a farmfield in Weedsport,NY/fingerlakes region..at about 5:pm,
          Message 4 of 4 , Mar 19, 2012
            That behavior sounds like Xylocopa to me.

            David

            At 12:14 PM 3/19/2012, Liz Day wrote:
             

            > rural central NY/fingerlakes region. for two years
            now..specifically today: 3/18/12 here in a farmfield in
            Weedsport,NY/fingerlakes region..at about 5:pm, while on a hike with
            my dog...I first noticed a large 'bumbel-bee'. ..

            > I attempted to use my point&shoot camera to image capture this
            large Bombus species...but it aggressively flew off the ground level
            plants it was searching ( no flowers in this large foder-crop field
            )...it began to fly about me at head level for three rotations, then
            it flew up to a great height and left the field....

            Among the first species to come out are bimaculatus and terricola (if
            present)..... I don't know dates for your area, so these may have
            already emerged and you may be seeing something else... photos are
            needed for ID. Here in Indiana, Xylocopa are also out. They're big.

            I had always thought that that "approach&circle" (or flying back and
            forth) behavior was simply the bee looking to see what you are;
            perhaps your clothing colors suggest a possible flower, or maybe it
            is wondering if you're a threat...
            thoughts anyone?

            Liz Day
            Indianapolis IN USA

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