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Exomalopsis males added to guide

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  • Michael Orr
    Hello, At long last, the Exomalopsis guide has been completed for both genders for the entire US. The species pair of E. birkmanni and E. solani is one of the
    Message 1 of 1 , Jan 17, 2012
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      Hello,


      At long last, the Exomalopsis guide has been completed for both genders for the entire US. The species pair of E. birkmanni and E. solani is one of the more problematic in the covered species and it isn't entirely clear that they're two distinct species, as differences appear almost entirely based upon color. The species E. tibialis is another problematic one, largely due to its rarity. I have yet to see any females of this species, although the male I have seen seems distinct. In light of this I have scored the male and left the female unscored currently.

      Any comments or questions should be directed to michael.christopher.orr@....


      Characters:
      Male, legs, hair color 
      All Light - All light, with NO dark brown or black hairs (analis, birkmanni, hurdi, similis, solani, solidaginis) 
      Some Dark Hairs Present - With at least some degree of DARK hairs present on the legs, this usually most apparent on the hind leg (analis, dimidiata, snowi, tibialis) 

      Male, thorax, tegula, color 
      Light - Yellow to orangish, and usually transparent (analis, similis, snowi, solani, solidaginis, tibialis) 
      Dark - Dark brownish, usually translucent or opaque (birkmanni, hurdi, similis, solani, solidaginis) 

      Male, thorax, propodeum, pitting along the basal edge which borders the metanotum 
      Absent - Neither pitting nor hairs are present medially (dimidiata, hurdi, solidaginis) 
      Present, Sparse  - Pitting relatively sparse and variable, average pit interspaces greater than their own diameter, and USUALLY without hairs at the middle (birkmanni, dimidiata, hurdi, solani) 
      Present, Dense - Pitting dense and roughly evenly spaced, with average pit interspaces less than their own diameter, and with hairs present medially (analis, similis, snowi, solani, tibialis) 

      Male, abdomen, tergites, pattern of pale hairs 
      Largely absent - With dense, long hairs of variable color present basally, these hairs normally projecting back over the unpitted apical rim (birkmanni, dimidiata, hurdi, solani, solidaginis) 
      Present - With hair covering the surface of the terga nearly entirely, light densely appressed hairs near the base and middle forming a complete latitudinal band BUT with black hairs along the rims (snowi, tibialis) 
      Present - With a latitudinal strip of pale, appressed hairs which are flanked AT LEAST basally by dark hairs and sometimes also apically (analis, similis, tibialis) 


      Male, abdomen, T7, hair color - Be sure that you are looking at HAIR COLOR and not what it may APPEAR to be due to integumental color 
      All Pale - Hairs entirely light or with only a few dark hairs, whitish to orangish in color (analis, birkmanni, similis, solani, solidaginis) 
      Primarily Dark - Primarily dark hairs particularly laterally, sometimes with some limited light hairs medially (analis, hurdi, snowi, tibialis)  

      Male, E. analis vs E. similis 
      E. analis - The patch of longer hairs along the posterior edge or rim of the scutellum is composed of both dark and light hairs, sometimes the dark hairs only grayish rather than black, these are in addition to the shorter black hairs present basally - The hairs along the upper, posterior edge of the hind tibia are, in comparison to E. similis, SHORTER near the apex, usually extending off the segment by less than the width of the tibia when viewed in profile - Almost always at least a few of the hairs on the outer face of the hind tibia are black, this most common near the anterior edge 
      E. similis - The patch of longer hairs along the posterior edge or rim of the scutellum is composed of lighter, yellowish-brown hairs which are far lighter than the shorter black hairs present basally - The hairs along the posterior edge of the hind tibia are LONGER compared to E. analis near the apex, usually extending off the tibia by more than its width in profile - The hairs on the outer face of the hind tibia are all light, white to off-white 

      Male, E. birkmanni vs E. solani - Caution, this is a hard-to-distinguish species pair - According to both Timberlake in his 1980 publication and the author of this guide E. birkmanni is likely just a subspecies or variant of E. solani 
      E. birkmanni - In direct comparison, the hairs of the body are yellowish - According to Timberlake the wings of this species are darker - This species is less common, recorded in Texas and throughout Mexico 
      E. solani - In direct comparison, the hairs of the body are whitish - According to Timberlake the wings of this species are lighter - This is the most common North American species of the group, present from Arizona to Texas and up to Utah while also widespread in Mexico  

      Male, E. snowi vs other species 
      E. snowi - Mandible integumental color yellowish - Scape integumental color yellowish, golden to orangish
      Other species - Mandible integumental color reddish-brown to black - Scape integumental color brownish like the surrounding integument of the head

      Male, E. hurdi vs other species 
      E. hurdi - The apical two-thirds to three-fourths of the posterior edge of the hind tibia there is lined with light, extremely dense hair, clearly denser than elsewhere on the hind tibia - This hair patch is distinct enough that it is even obvious when matted 
      Other species - LACKING an extremely dense patch of pale hairs on the posterior edge of the hind tibia, the hairs here appearing sparse and about equal in density to elsewhere on the hind tibia although they may be pale 


      -Michael Orr
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