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groundnesting bee reuse of nests?

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  • nancy lee adamson
    Hi, folks, I was asked if groundnesting bees reuse their nests. The bits and pieces I ve found so far seem to imply that social bees tend to reuse the nests,
    Message 1 of 5 , Jan 9, 2012
      Hi, folks, 

      I was asked if groundnesting bees reuse their nests.  The bits and pieces I've found so far seem to imply that social bees tend to reuse the nests, while less likely for solitary bees.  Does this sound right? 

      If you can recommend any articles, I'd appreciate it.

      Thanks.

      Nancy Adamson




    • Doug Yanega
      ... It depends on your definition of re-use . Some ground-nesting bees will sometimes commandeer nests already inhabited by others (hostile takeovers), and
      Message 2 of 5 , Jan 9, 2012
        Nancy wrote:

        >I was asked if groundnesting bees reuse their nests. The bits and
        >pieces I've found so far seem to imply that social bees tend to
        >reuse the nests, while less likely for solitary bees. Does this
        >sound right?

        It depends on your definition of "re-use". Some ground-nesting bees
        will sometimes commandeer nests already inhabited by others (hostile
        takeovers), and social species will use the same nest for multiple
        generations, but I don't consider either of those to be "re-use"
        because there is no phase where the nest does not contain either
        adults or brood. I would only term it "re-use" if the nest goes
        through a period where it is *completely* vacant. In that sense, I'm
        not aware of ground-nesting species that re-use conspecific nests,
        whether social or solitary. However, there are some well-known cases
        of bees of one species using abandoend burrows of another: e.g., (1)
        very long-lasting mixed aggregations of Melitoma and Ancyloscelis
        where the latter appear to make use of old tunnels made by the
        former, and (2) Megachile neoxanthoptera, which will re-use old nests
        of Ptilothrix and Diadasina.

        Therefore, the closest things I can think of are cases in solitary
        bees, using nests of other species.

        Peace,
        --

        Doug Yanega Dept. of Entomology Entomology Research Museum
        Univ. of California, Riverside, CA 92521-0314 skype: dyanega
        phone: (951) 827-4315 (standard disclaimer: opinions are mine, not UCR's)
        http://cache.ucr.edu/~heraty/yanega.html
        "There are some enterprises in which a careful disorderliness
        is the true method" - Herman Melville, Moby Dick, Chap. 82
      • Jack Neff
        Reuse of ground nests by solitary bees probably is not extensive in most species but it does occur.  I found indications of nest reuse by Anthemurgus
        Message 3 of 5 , Jan 9, 2012
          Reuse of ground nests by solitary bees probably is not extensive in most species but it does occur.  I found indications of nest reuse by Anthemurgus passiflorae (American Museum Novitates 3138: 1-19, 1995 (pdfs available from the American Museum website) and it certainly occurs in Colletes kincaidii which nests in sandstone banks, and probably also in Macrotera opuntiae which also nests in stone (sort of).  Panurginus polytrichus (Kansas Entomological Society 76: 203-216; 2003) occasionally reuses nests.  Reuse of burrows as been reported in some Diphaglossines as well.   As is the case in Xylocopa, reuse of nests (at least the burrow, if not individual cells), is to be expected when nest construction costs are high.


          best

          Jack
           
          John L. Neff
          Central Texas Melittological Institute
          7307 Running Rope
          Austin,TX 78731 USA
          512-345-7219

          From: Doug Yanega <dyanega@...>
          To: beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Monday, January 9, 2012 4:10 PM
          Subject: Re: [beemonitoring] groundnesting bee reuse of nests?

           
          Nancy wrote:

          >I was asked if groundnesting bees reuse their nests. The bits and
          >pieces I've found so far seem to imply that social bees tend to
          >reuse the nests, while less likely for solitary bees. Does this
          >sound right?

          It depends on your definition of "re-use". Some ground-nesting bees
          will sometimes commandeer nests already inhabited by others (hostile
          takeovers), and social species will use the same nest for multiple
          generations, but I don't consider either of those to be "re-use"
          because there is no phase where the nest does not contain either
          adults or brood. I would only term it "re-use" if the nest goes
          through a period where it is *completely* vacant. In that sense, I'm
          not aware of ground-nesting species that re-use conspecific nests,
          whether social or solitary. However, there are some well-known cases
          of bees of one species using abandoend burrows of another: e.g., (1)
          very long-lasting mixed aggregations of Melitoma and Ancyloscelis
          where the latter appear to make use of old tunnels made by the
          former, and (2) Megachile neoxanthoptera, which will re-use old nests
          of Ptilothrix and Diadasina.

          Therefore, the closest things I can think of are cases in solitary
          bees, using nests of other species.

          Peace,
          --

          Doug Yanega Dept. of Entomology Entomology Research Museum
          Univ. of California, Riverside, CA 92521-0314 skype: dyanega
          phone: (951) 827-4315 (standard disclaimer: opinions are mine, not UCR's)
          http://cache.ucr.edu/~heraty/yanega.html
          "There are some enterprises in which a careful disorderliness
          is the true method" - Herman Melville, Moby Dick, Chap. 82


        • Cane, Jim
          Folks- something that can resemble reuse of ground nests is females adopting emergence holes of the season, rather than starting a nest hole from scratch. It
          Message 4 of 5 , Jan 9, 2012

            Folks- something that can resemble reuse of ground nests is females adopting emergence holes of the season, rather than starting a nest hole from scratch.  It is especially common to see with the many thousands of Nomia melanderi in their big aggregations.  I can send a pdf if you like. 

             

            Yours

             

            jim

             

            ===============================

            James H. Cane

            USDA-ARS Bee Biology and Systematics Lab

            Utah State University, Logan, UT 84322 USA

            tel: 435-797-3879   FAX: 435-797-0461

            email: Jim.Cane@... 

            web page: www.ars.usda.gov/npa/beelab

             

          • Laurence Packer
            Greetings Things can get complicated. Quite a few bees overwinter beneath the natal nest in hibernacula that are extensions of the natal nest. When these bees
            Message 5 of 5 , Jan 9, 2012
              Greetings

              Things can get complicated.
              Quite a few bees overwinter beneath the natal nest in hibernacula that are extensions of the natal nest.
              When these bees burrow up to the surface the following spring they may well be going through parts of what was the previous year's nest.
              If they use parts of this as their own nest the following year, this might be considered as re-using the original nest.
              In reality, I suspect that it would be rather rare for a daughter female to somehow find herself occupying much of the nest burrow from the year before.
              However, this behaviour does help explain the microscale nest clustering that is commonly observed.
              That said, Doug's work on the ruddy driveway bee has demonstrated a remarkable "homing" accuracy even when females overwinter away from the natal nest aggregation.

              Endlessly fascinating these little creatures.

              cheers

              laurence

              --- On Mon, 1/9/12, Cane, Jim <Jim.Cane@...> wrote:

              From: Cane, Jim <Jim.Cane@...>
              Subject: RE: [beemonitoring] groundnesting bee reuse of emergence holes
              To: "Jack Neff" <jlnatctmi@...>, "Doug Yanega" <dyanega@...>, "beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com" <beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com>
              Received: Monday, January 9, 2012, 7:45 PM

               

              Folks- something that can resemble reuse of ground nests is females adopting emergence holes of the season, rather than starting a nest hole from scratch.  It is especially common to see with the many thousands of Nomia melanderi in their big aggregations.  I can send a pdf if you like. 

               

              Yours

               

              jim

               

              ===============================

              James H. Cane

              USDA-ARS Bee Biology and Systematics Lab

              Utah State University, Logan, UT 84322 USA

              tel: 435-797-3879   FAX: 435-797-0461

              email: Jim.Cane@... 

              web page: www.ars.usda.gov/npa/beelab

               

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