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Re: [beemonitoring] An introduction of Orchard Bee Association and a collaboration request

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  • Dave Hunter
    Doug, that s a great question that I should have answered in the first email. I admit to being out of the loop on Osmia work, so forgive me if this is naive,
    Message 1 of 11 , Dec 13, 2011

      Doug, that’s a great question that I should have answered in the first email.

      I admit to being out of the loop on Osmia work, so forgive me if this is naive, but the first obvious question I have is this: given that three of the four species listed above are non-native, has it been adequately demonstrated to everyone's satisfaction that the introduction of these exotic bees will have no potentially disruptive effects on the numerous native Californian Osmia species?

       

      In our preliminary meeting last year, OBA specifically determined that only O. lignaria propinqua would be used in the west coast of the US orchards.  O. lignaria lignaria (native eastern states) and O. cornifrons (naturalized in most eastern US states) will be used in eastern orchards. 

       

      We believe research of these four species may be similar as they are all spring emerging bees.  No bees will be used outside their native or naturalized environment. 

       

      We already have several European members that use the O. cornuta and O. rufa.  We’re looking to collaborate efforts across the waters.

       

       

      Dave Hunter

      Description: cid:428334615@02052011-35DF

      O. 425.949.7954

      C. 206.851.1263

      www.crownbees.com

       Click below to hear the buzz!

      Description: Description: cid:image002.png@...4545C0Description: Description: cid:image003.png@...4545C0Description: Description: cid:image004.png@...4545C0

       

    • Doug Yanega
      ... That s very reassuring - the way the original posting was phrased, this was certainly not at all clear. It does raise one additional question, which the
      Message 2 of 11 , Dec 14, 2011
        Re: [beemonitoring] An introduction of Orchard Bee Associa
        Dave Hunter wrote:

        In our preliminary meeting last year, OBA specifically determined that only O. lignaria propinqua would be used in the west coast of the US orchards.  O. lignaria lignaria (native eastern states) and O. cornifrons (naturalized in m! ost eastern US states) will be used in eastern orchards.

        We believe research of these four species may be similar as they are all spring emerging bees.  No bees will be used outside their native or naturalized environment.

        We already have several European members that use the O. cornuta and O. rufa.  We're looking to collaborate efforts across the waters.

        That's very reassuring - the way the original posting was phrased, this was certainly not at all clear. It does raise one additional question, which the folks in Logan might also comment on:

        Are there attempts completed, underway, or planned, to perform any sort of systematic assessment of other native Osmia (especially in the western states) for potential commercial use as pollinators? With so many species, it's hard to imagine that *only* lignaria is a viable candidate, at least biologically - but I also realize that the investment of time and energy into performing assessment may make it seem more appealing to focus on customizing the "technology" a single species if only limited resources are available.

        Is that the case here?

        Peace,
        -- 
        

        Doug Yanega        Dept. of Entomology         Entomology Research Museum
        Univ. of California, Riverside, CA 92521-0314        skype: dyanega
        phone: (951) 827-4315 (standard disclaimer: opinions are mine, not UCR's)
                     http://cache.ucr.edu/~heraty/yanega.html
          "There are some enterprises in which a careful disorderliness
                is the true method" - Herman Melville, Moby Dick, Chap. 82
      • Cane, Jim
        Doug and others- I have been learning biologies, evaluating pollination values, figuring out nesting needs and practical affordable to supply these, and
        Message 3 of 11 , Dec 14, 2011

          Doug and others- I have been learning biologies, evaluating pollination values, figuring out nesting needs and practical affordable to supply these, and multiplying several Osmia species here.  These are: 1) Osmia aglaia for raspberry/blackberry pollination along its range west of the Cascades and Sierra Nevada Mtns in Oregon and Washington, 2) Osmia bruneri (closely similar bee) for this purpose and for native legumes for seed production in its range of the Intermountain West and Rockies, and 3) Osmia sanrafaelae for the latter purpose in the eastern Intermountain West where I have encountered it.  My many tries with Osmia ribifloris for blueberry pollination have been thrwarted by this bees’ insistence on pre-nesting dispersal (in a large screenhouse, it settles down and does nicely).  The task becomes most challenging once numbers are large (we’ve had as many as 20,000 of two of the species in management) because we have to work with them far away where at most I only have control over release.  In springs with atypical weather, like the last one, our population was greatly diminished because we were already committed to shipping, incubation and release dates.  And it gets expensive, with shipping charges alone of $500+.  At times I really do wonder if it is worth all of my bother, although it has been a good learning experience.

           

          Yours

           

          jim

           

          ===============================

          James H. Cane

          USDA-ARS Bee Biology and Systematics Lab

          Utah State University, Logan, UT 84322 USA

          tel: 435-797-3879   FAX: 435-797-0461

          email: Jim.Cane@... 

          web page: www.ars.usda.gov/npa/beelab

           

          From: beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com [mailto:beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Doug Yanega
          Sent: Wednesday, December 14, 2011 11:33 AM
          To: beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: Re: [beemonitoring] An introduction of Orchard Bee Association and a collaboration request

           

           

          Dave Hunter wrote:

           

          In our preliminary meeting last year, OBA specifically determined that only O. lignaria propinqua would be used in the west coast of the US orchards.  O. lignaria lignaria (native eastern states) and O. cornifrons (naturalized in m! ost eastern US states) will be used in eastern orchards.

           

          We believe research of these four species may be similar as they are all spring emerging bees.  No bees will be used outside their native or naturalized environment.

           

          We already have several European members that use the O. cornuta and O. rufa.  We're looking to collaborate efforts across the waters.

           

          That's very reassuring - the way the original posting was phrased, this was certainly not at all clear. It does raise one additional question, which the folks in Logan might also comment on:

           

          Are there attempts completed, underway, or planned, to perform any sort of systematic assessment of other native Osmia (especially in the western states) for potential commercial use as pollinators? With so many species, it's hard to imagine that *only* lignaria is a viable candidate, at least biologically - but I also realize that the investment of time and energy into performing assessment may make it seem more appealing to focus on customizing the "technology" a single species if only limited resources are available.

           

          Is that the case here?

           

          Peace,

          -- 


          Doug Yanega        Dept. of Entomology         Entomology Research Museum
          Univ. of California, Riverside, CA 92521-0314        skype: dyanega
          phone: (951) 827-4315 (standard disclaimer: opinions are mine, not UCR's)
                       http://cache.ucr.edu/~heraty/yanega.html
            "There are some enterprises in which a careful disorderliness
                  is the true method" - Herman Melville, Moby Dick, Chap. 82

        • Cane, Jim
          Oops, a corrections in my last email. For Osmia aglaia, that is Oregon and California, not Oregon and Washington . Washington would be nice, as a lot of
          Message 4 of 11 , Dec 14, 2011

            Oops, a corrections in my last email.  For Osmia aglaia, that is Oregon and California, not “Oregon and Washington”.  Washington would be nice, as a lot of Rubus are grown there, but the Osmia aglaia has not been collected there.

             

            Yours,

             

            jim

             

            ===============================

            James H. Cane

            USDA-ARS Bee Biology and Systematics Lab

            Utah State University, Logan, UT 84322 USA

            tel: 435-797-3879   FAX: 435-797-0461

            email: Jim.Cane@... 

            web page: www.ars.usda.gov/npa/beelab

             

            From: beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com [mailto:beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Cane, Jim
            Sent: Wednesday, December 14, 2011 11:49 AM
            To: Doug Yanega; beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: [beemonitoring] RE: working with other Osmia

             

             

            Doug and others- I have been learning biologies, evaluating pollination values, figuring out nesting needs and practical affordable to supply these, and multiplying several Osmia species here.  These are: 1) Osmia aglaia for raspberry/blackberry pollination along its range west of the Cascades and Sierra Nevada Mtns in Oregon and Washington, 2) Osmia bruneri (closely similar bee) for this purpose and for native legumes for seed production in its range of the Intermountain West and Rockies, and 3) Osmia sanrafaelae for the latter purpose in the eastern Intermountain West where I have encountered it.  My many tries with Osmia ribifloris for blueberry pollination have been thrwarted by this bees’ insistence on pre-nesting dispersal (in a large screenhouse, it settles down and does nicely).  The task becomes most challenging once numbers are large (we’ve had as many as 20,000 of two of the species in management) because we have to work with them far away where at most I only have control over release.  In springs with atypical weather, like the last one, our population was greatly diminished because we were already committed to shipping, incubation and release dates.  And it gets expensive, with shipping charges alone of $500+.  At times I really do wonder if it is worth all of my bother, although it has been a good learning experience.

             

            Yours

             

            jim

             

            ===============================

            James H. Cane

            USDA-ARS Bee Biology and Systematics Lab

            Utah State University, Logan, UT 84322 USA

            tel: 435-797-3879   FAX: 435-797-0461

            email: Jim.Cane@... 

            web page: www.ars.usda.gov/npa/beelab

             

            From: beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com [mailto:beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Doug Yanega
            Sent: Wednesday, December 14, 2011 11:33 AM
            To: beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: Re: [beemonitoring] An introduction of Orchard Bee Association and a collaboration request

             

             

            Dave Hunter wrote:

             

            In our preliminary meeting last year, OBA specifically determined that only O. lignaria propinqua would be used in the west coast of the US orchards.  O. lignaria lignaria (native eastern states) and O. cornifrons (naturalized in m! ost eastern US states) will be used in eastern orchards.

             

            We believe research of these four species may be similar as they are all spring emerging bees.  No bees will be used outside their native or naturalized environment.

             

            We already have several European members that use the O. cornuta and O. rufa.  We're looking to collaborate efforts across the waters.

             

            That's very reassuring - the way the original posting was phrased, this was certainly not at all clear. It does raise one additional question, which the folks in Logan might also comment on:

             

            Are there attempts completed, underway, or planned, to perform any sort of systematic assessment of other native Osmia (especially in the western states) for potential commercial use as pollinators? With so many species, it's hard to imagine that *only* lignaria is a viable candidate, at least biologically - but I also realize that the investment of time and energy into performing assessment may make it seem more appealing to focus on customizing the "technology" a single species if only limited resources are available.

             

            Is that the case here?

             

            Peace,

            -- 


            Doug Yanega        Dept. of Entomology         Entomology Research Museum
            Univ. of California, Riverside, CA 92521-0314        skype: dyanega
            phone: (951) 827-4315 (standard disclaimer: opinions are mine, not UCR's)
                         http://cache.ucr.edu/~heraty/yanega.html
              "There are some enterprises in which a careful disorderliness
                    is the true method" - Herman Melville, Moby Dick, Chap. 82

          • Kenneth W McCravy
            Hi, I ve heard it stated that bees are the most important group of pollinators. Can anyone suggest published studies comparing bees with other groups of
            Message 5 of 11 , Dec 15, 2011
              Hi,

              I've heard it stated that bees are the most important group of pollinators. Can anyone suggest published studies comparing bees with other groups of pollinators in terms of efficiency, number of plant species pollinated, or other measures, and how this might vary geographically (maybe patterns related to latitude or altitude)?

              Thanks!
              Ken

              Kenneth W. McCravy, Ph.D.
              Professor
              Department of Biological Sciences
              Western Illinois University
              1 University Circle
              Macomb, IL 61455
              Phone: (309) 298-2160
              Fax: (309) 298-2270
              Email: KW-McCravy@...
            • Robert Jean
              Ken, The following is a good paper on pollinator efficiency; however it shows the generalist flies to be as effective as the specialist Andrena erigeniae on
              Message 6 of 11 , Dec 15, 2011
                Ken,
                The following is a good paper on pollinator efficiency; however it shows the generalist flies to be as effective as the specialist Andrena erigeniae on flowers of Claytonia virginica (Spring beauty). Motten, A. F., D. R. Campbell, et al. (1981). "Pollination effectiveness of specialist and generalist visitors to a North Carolina population of Claytonia virginica." Ecology 62(5): 1278-1287. No info on geographic variation here though
                Rob Jean


                From: Kenneth W McCravy <KW-McCravy@...>
                To: beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com
                Sent: Thursday, December 15, 2011 2:19 PM
                Subject: [beemonitoring] Bees vs. other pollinators

                 
                Hi,

                I've heard it stated that bees are the most important group of pollinators. Can anyone suggest published studies comparing bees with other groups of pollinators in terms of efficiency, number of plant species pollinated, or other measures, and how this might vary geographically (maybe patterns related to latitude or altitude)?

                Thanks!
                Ken

                Kenneth W. McCravy, Ph.D.
                Professor
                Department of Biological Sciences
                Western Illinois University
                1 University Circle
                Macomb, IL 61455
                Phone: (309) 298-2160
                Fax: (309) 298-2270
                Email: KW-McCravy@...


              • Stoner, Kimberly
                I have attached a couple of review articles on the importance of dipteran pollinators. These have references to some comparisons between bees and flies.
                Message 7 of 11 , Dec 15, 2011

                I have attached a couple of review articles on the importance of dipteran pollinators.  These have references to some comparisons between bees and flies.  Hopefully you will be able to open them – if not, let me know and I’ll send the references.

                 

                Kim Stoner

                 

                From: beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com [mailto:beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Robert Jean
                Sent: Thursday, December 15, 2011 3:06 PM
                To: Kenneth W McCravy; beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com
                Subject: Re: [beemonitoring] Bees vs. other pollinators

                 

                 

                Ken,

                The following is a good paper on pollinator efficiency; however it shows the generalist flies to be as effective as the specialist Andrena erigeniae on flowers of Claytonia virginica (Spring beauty). Motten, A. F., D. R. Campbell, et al. (1981). "Pollination effectiveness of specialist and generalist visitors to a North Carolina population of Claytonia virginica." Ecology 62(5): 1278-1287. No info on geographic variation here though

                Rob Jean

                 


                From: Kenneth W McCravy <KW-McCravy@...>
                To: beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com
                Sent: Thursday, December 15, 2011 2:19 PM
                Subject: [beemonitoring] Bees vs. other pollinators

                 

                Hi,

                I've heard it stated that bees are the most important group of pollinators. Can anyone suggest published studies comparing bees with other groups of pollinators in terms of efficiency, number of plant species pollinated, or other measures, and how this might vary geographically (maybe patterns related to latitude or altitude)?

                Thanks!
                Ken

                Kenneth W. McCravy, Ph.D.
                Professor
                Department of Biological Sciences
                Western Illinois University
                1 University Circle
                Macomb, IL 61455
                Phone: (309) 298-2160
                Fax: (309) 298-2270
                Email: KW-McCravy@...

                 

              • Cane, Jim
                Bob, Ken and others- I agree, that is a splendid study, a great one for teaching and discussion. Something that most folks overlook in that paper, however,
                Message 8 of 11 , Dec 15, 2011

                  Bob, Ken and others- I agree, that is a splendid study, a great one for teaching and discussion.  Something that most folks overlook in that paper, however, but Motten reports, is that the specialist bee deposits more pollen than the fly when either is coming from a pistillate flower (that is, pollen carryover is great with the specialist).  It is a nice nuance, I think.

                   

                  At the community level (or sometimes even at the level of a floral guild), the challenge becomes demonstrating that a species 9and sex sometimes) of floral visitor indeed pollinates (even more work to quantify), a very daunting task if you have many plant species in a local community.  Jordi Bosch and colleagues in Barcelona Spain are gradually working up such a data set, but it is taking many field seasons to assemble.

                   

                  yours

                   

                  jim

                   

                  ===============================

                  James H. Cane

                  USDA-ARS Bee Biology and Systematics Lab

                  Utah State University, Logan, UT 84322 USA

                  tel: 435-797-3879   FAX: 435-797-0461

                  email: Jim.Cane@... 

                  web page: www.ars.usda.gov/npa/beelab

                   

                  From: beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com [mailto:beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Robert Jean
                  Sent: Thursday, December 15, 2011 1:06 PM
                  To: Kenneth W McCravy; beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com
                  Subject: Re: [beemonitoring] Bees vs. other pollinators

                   

                   

                  Ken,

                  The following is a good paper on pollinator efficiency; however it shows the generalist flies to be as effective as the specialist Andrena erigeniae on flowers of Claytonia virginica (Spring beauty). Motten, A. F., D. R. Campbell, et al. (1981). "Pollination effectiveness of specialist and generalist visitors to a North Carolina population of Claytonia virginica." Ecology 62(5): 1278-1287. No info on geographic variation here though

                  Rob Jean

                   


                  From: Kenneth W McCravy <KW-McCravy@...>
                  To: beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com
                  Sent: Thursday, December 15, 2011 2:19 PM
                  Subject: [beemonitoring] Bees vs. other pollinators

                   

                  Hi,

                  I've heard it stated that bees are the most important group of pollinators. Can anyone suggest published studies comparing bees with other groups of pollinators in terms of efficiency, number of plant species pollinated, or other measures, and how this might vary geographically (maybe patterns related to latitude or altitude)?

                  Thanks!
                  Ken

                  Kenneth W. McCravy, Ph.D.
                  Professor
                  Department of Biological Sciences
                  Western Illinois University
                  1 University Circle
                  Macomb, IL 61455
                  Phone: (309) 298-2160
                  Fax: (309) 298-2270
                  Email: KW-McCravy@...

                   

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