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RE: [beemonitoring] cardboard tubes, various sizes and intro.

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  • Wilson, Michael E
    Thanks to all for the for the numerous tips. With the extra router bits and drilling we will be in good shape. However, if I can just find a 5/16th router bit
    Message 1 of 9 , Feb 11, 2008
      Thanks to all for the for the numerous tips.
      With the extra router bits and drilling we will be in
      good shape. However, if I can just
      find a 5/16th router bit we will be even better.
      This looks to be very close to the 7.5mm recommended for
      Osmia lignaria. It would be nice to have that size for
      our routed boards, but no one online seems to carry a 5/16th.

      Thanks again,
      Michael Wilson


      -----Original Message-----
      From: beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com on behalf of Jack Neff
      Sent: Fri 2/8/2008 10:36 AM
      To: beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: Re: [beemonitoring] cardboard tubes, various sizes and intro.

      Michael: You probably won't be able to get the range
      of straws you mention (2-10 mm) without spending some
      serious coin as most sizes would have to be custom
      manufactured. For relatively small lots, an easy
      technique is simply using a handheld drill to bore
      single holes in pieces of pine molding cut to
      appropriate lengths. (see Krombein, 1967 "Trapnesting
      Wasps and Bees...." Parting strip works fine for the
      smallest sizes (2-4 mm), 3/4x3/4 for the intermediate
      sizes and 1x1 for the largest. Extra long drill bits
      are available in all but the smallest sizes. In the
      real world, a 12 cm, 8 mm nest is unlikely to be fully
      utilized so shorter holes are usually readily
      accepted. If of decent quality (no knots), the
      individual are easily split to inspect the nests, and
      unlike straws, can be opened and closed many times.
      This is also an advantage over routed nests although
      the latter are much cheaper on a per nest basis..

      best

      Jack Neff
      --- Michael Wilson <mwilso14@...> wrote:

      > Hi,
      >
      > My name is Michael Wilson. I'm a graduate student at
      > the University of
      > Tennessee, Knoxville and am doing a study on native
      > bees in our area,
      > primarily at cucurbit plantings. I'm glad to have
      > found this group and
      > have enjoyed reviewing the material.
      >
      > Part of my project is to put out various size trap
      > nests in different
      > areas to asses 'stick nesting' bee presence.
      > Ideally, I would like a
      > wide variety of diameter of cardboard tubes from 2mm
      > - 10mm to use as
      > explained in Practical Pollination Biology. I have
      > some reed inter
      > nodes, but not as many as I would like. We also
      > routed out some boards
      > to stack, but only have 2 different sizes of router
      > bits to choose
      > from and have been unable to find more bit sizes.
      >
      > Question:
      > Is there a reasonable place to buy a wide variety of
      > cardboard tube
      > diameters?
      >
      > The places I've seen on the internet either require
      > bulk (very bulk)
      > purchasing or only have the size for the Blue
      > Orchard Bees. I may
      > drill sticks and blocks or try and find some more
      > reeds if I can't get
      > a variety of tubes. Are there other options?
      >
      > Also, anyone know when putting out nests in my area,
      > (East Tennessee)
      > will be too late to get some species? I'm thinking
      > as long as I have
      > everything out by the end of February I'll be OK.
      >
      > Thanks,
      > Michael Wilson
      >
      >


      John L. Neff
      Central Texas Melittological Institute
      7307 Running Rope
      Austin,TX 78731 USA
      512-345-7219


      ____________________________________________________________________________________
      Be a better friend, newshound, and
      know-it-all with Yahoo! Mobile. Try it now. http://mobile.yahoo.com/;_ylt=Ahu06i62sR8HDtDypao8Wcj9tAcJ
    • Wilson, Michael E
      Found it! http://www.houseoftools.com/product.htm?pid=17287 thanks to this website http://www.cvseeds.bc.ca/bees.htm ... From: beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com on
      Message 2 of 9 , Feb 11, 2008
        Found it!
        http://www.houseoftools.com/product.htm?pid=17287

        thanks to this website
        http://www.cvseeds.bc.ca/bees.htm


        -----Original Message-----
        From: beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com on behalf of Wilson, Michael E
        Sent: Mon 2/11/2008 7:51 AM
        To: beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: RE: [beemonitoring] cardboard tubes, various sizes and intro.

        Thanks to all for the for the numerous tips.
        With the extra router bits and drilling we will be in
        good shape. However, if I can just
        find a 5/16th router bit we will be even better.
        This looks to be very close to the 7.5mm recommended for
        Osmia lignaria. It would be nice to have that size for
        our routed boards, but no one online seems to carry a 5/16th.

        Thanks again,
        Michael Wilson


        -----Original Message-----
        From: beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com on behalf of Jack Neff
        Sent: Fri 2/8/2008 10:36 AM
        To: beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: Re: [beemonitoring] cardboard tubes, various sizes and intro.

        Michael: You probably won't be able to get the range
        of straws you mention (2-10 mm) without spending some
        serious coin as most sizes would have to be custom
        manufactured. For relatively small lots, an easy
        technique is simply using a handheld drill to bore
        single holes in pieces of pine molding cut to
        appropriate lengths. (see Krombein, 1967 "Trapnesting
        Wasps and Bees...." Parting strip works fine for the
        smallest sizes (2-4 mm), 3/4x3/4 for the intermediate
        sizes and 1x1 for the largest. Extra long drill bits
        are available in all but the smallest sizes. In the
        real world, a 12 cm, 8 mm nest is unlikely to be fully
        utilized so shorter holes are usually readily
        accepted. If of decent quality (no knots), the
        individual are easily split to inspect the nests, and
        unlike straws, can be opened and closed many times.
        This is also an advantage over routed nests although
        the latter are much cheaper on a per nest basis..

        best

        Jack Neff
        --- Michael Wilson <mwilso14@...> wrote:

        > Hi,
        >
        > My name is Michael Wilson. I'm a graduate student at
        > the University of
        > Tennessee, Knoxville and am doing a study on native
        > bees in our area,
        > primarily at cucurbit plantings. I'm glad to have
        > found this group and
        > have enjoyed reviewing the material.
        >
        > Part of my project is to put out various size trap
        > nests in different
        > areas to asses 'stick nesting' bee presence.
        > Ideally, I would like a
        > wide variety of diameter of cardboard tubes from 2mm
        > - 10mm to use as
        > explained in Practical Pollination Biology. I have
        > some reed inter
        > nodes, but not as many as I would like. We also
        > routed out some boards
        > to stack, but only have 2 different sizes of router
        > bits to choose
        > from and have been unable to find more bit sizes.
        >
        > Question:
        > Is there a reasonable place to buy a wide variety of
        > cardboard tube
        > diameters?
        >
        > The places I've seen on the internet either require
        > bulk (very bulk)
        > purchasing or only have the size for the Blue
        > Orchard Bees. I may
        > drill sticks and blocks or try and find some more
        > reeds if I can't get
        > a variety of tubes. Are there other options?
        >
        > Also, anyone know when putting out nests in my area,
        > (East Tennessee)
        > will be too late to get some species? I'm thinking
        > as long as I have
        > everything out by the end of February I'll be OK.
        >
        > Thanks,
        > Michael Wilson
        >
        >


        John L. Neff
        Central Texas Melittological Institute
        7307 Running Rope
        Austin,TX 78731 USA
        512-345-7219


        ____________________________________________________________________________________
        Be a better friend, newshound, and
        know-it-all with Yahoo! Mobile. Try it now. http://mobile.yahoo.com/;_ylt=Ahu06i62sR8HDtDypao8Wcj9tAcJ
      • Wilson, Michael E
        Sorry, that bit is 5/16 radius, not diameter. Has anyone had luck with a daddo blade on a table saw to make square holes? The website I posted mentioned that.
        Message 3 of 9 , Feb 11, 2008
          Sorry, that bit is 5/16" radius, not diameter.

          Has anyone had luck with a daddo blade on a table saw to make square holes?
          The website I posted mentioned that. It would be an easy way to make a
          variety of sized holes, except they would be square on 4 sides instead of just two.
          Daddo blades come in stacks, so you could just remove blades in the stack to make it
          smaller. I'll have to measure to see if mine can get close to 5/16".

          Thanks,
          Michael Wilson


          -----Original Message-----
          From: beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com on behalf of Wilson, Michael E
          Sent: Mon 2/11/2008 8:48 AM
          To: beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: RE: [beemonitoring] cardboard tubes, various sizes and intro.

          Found it!
          http://www.houseoftools.com/product.htm?pid=17287

          thanks to this website
          http://www.cvseeds.bc.ca/bees.htm


          -----Original Message-----
          From: beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com on behalf of Wilson, Michael E
          Sent: Mon 2/11/2008 7:51 AM
          To: beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: RE: [beemonitoring] cardboard tubes, various sizes and intro.

          Thanks to all for the for the numerous tips.
          With the extra router bits and drilling we will be in
          good shape. However, if I can just
          find a 5/16th router bit we will be even better.
          This looks to be very close to the 7.5mm recommended for
          Osmia lignaria. It would be nice to have that size for
          our routed boards, but no one online seems to carry a 5/16th.

          Thanks again,
          Michael Wilson


          -----Original Message-----
          From: beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com on behalf of Jack Neff
          Sent: Fri 2/8/2008 10:36 AM
          To: beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: Re: [beemonitoring] cardboard tubes, various sizes and intro.

          Michael: You probably won't be able to get the range
          of straws you mention (2-10 mm) without spending some
          serious coin as most sizes would have to be custom
          manufactured. For relatively small lots, an easy
          technique is simply using a handheld drill to bore
          single holes in pieces of pine molding cut to
          appropriate lengths. (see Krombein, 1967 "Trapnesting
          Wasps and Bees...." Parting strip works fine for the
          smallest sizes (2-4 mm), 3/4x3/4 for the intermediate
          sizes and 1x1 for the largest. Extra long drill bits
          are available in all but the smallest sizes. In the
          real world, a 12 cm, 8 mm nest is unlikely to be fully
          utilized so shorter holes are usually readily
          accepted. If of decent quality (no knots), the
          individual are easily split to inspect the nests, and
          unlike straws, can be opened and closed many times.
          This is also an advantage over routed nests although
          the latter are much cheaper on a per nest basis..

          best

          Jack Neff
          --- Michael Wilson <mwilso14@...> wrote:

          > Hi,
          >
          > My name is Michael Wilson. I'm a graduate student at
          > the University of
          > Tennessee, Knoxville and am doing a study on native
          > bees in our area,
          > primarily at cucurbit plantings. I'm glad to have
          > found this group and
          > have enjoyed reviewing the material.
          >
          > Part of my project is to put out various size trap
          > nests in different
          > areas to asses 'stick nesting' bee presence.
          > Ideally, I would like a
          > wide variety of diameter of cardboard tubes from 2mm
          > - 10mm to use as
          > explained in Practical Pollination Biology. I have
          > some reed inter
          > nodes, but not as many as I would like. We also
          > routed out some boards
          > to stack, but only have 2 different sizes of router
          > bits to choose
          > from and have been unable to find more bit sizes.
          >
          > Question:
          > Is there a reasonable place to buy a wide variety of
          > cardboard tube
          > diameters?
          >
          > The places I've seen on the internet either require
          > bulk (very bulk)
          > purchasing or only have the size for the Blue
          > Orchard Bees. I may
          > drill sticks and blocks or try and find some more
          > reeds if I can't get
          > a variety of tubes. Are there other options?
          >
          > Also, anyone know when putting out nests in my area,
          > (East Tennessee)
          > will be too late to get some species? I'm thinking
          > as long as I have
          > everything out by the end of February I'll be OK.
          >
          > Thanks,
          > Michael Wilson
          >
          >


          John L. Neff
          Central Texas Melittological Institute
          7307 Running Rope
          Austin,TX 78731 USA
          512-345-7219


          ____________________________________________________________________________________
          Be a better friend, newshound, and
          know-it-all with Yahoo! Mobile. Try it now. http://mobile.yahoo.com/;_ylt=Ahu06i62sR8HDtDypao8Wcj9tAcJ
        • Sam Droege
          Michael: If you are willing to spend about $100-$150.00, there are many companies that will custom make a router bits for your in any profile you like....just
          Message 4 of 9 , Feb 11, 2008
            Michael:

            If you are willing to spend about $100-$150.00, there are many companies that will custom make a router bits for your in any profile you like....just google "custom router bits" for a look see.

            sam

            Sam Droege  Sam_Droege@...                      
            w 301-497-5840 h 301-390-7759 fax 301-497-5624
            USGS Patuxent Wildlife Research Center
            BARC-EAST, BLDG 308, RM 124 10300 Balt. Ave., Beltsville, MD  20705
            Http://www.pwrc.usgs.gov


            An ardent young golfer named Preen,
            Swung his club at some bees on the green;
            In response to his misses,
            They slipped him sharp kisses,
            Which he thought was exceedingly mean.


            V. Tepedino


            "Wilson, Michael E" <mwilso14@...>
            Sent by: beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com

            02/11/2008 08:48 AM

            Please respond to
            beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com

            To
            <beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com>
            cc
            Subject
            RE: [beemonitoring] cardboard tubes, various sizes and intro.





            Found it!
            http://www.houseoftools.com/product.htm?pid=17287

            thanks to this website

            http://www.cvseeds.bc.ca/bees.htm

            -----Original Message-----
            From:
            beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com on behalf of Wilson, Michael E
            Sent: Mon 2/11/2008 7:51 AM
            To:
            beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: RE: [beemonitoring] cardboard tubes, various sizes and intro.

            Thanks to all for the for the numerous tips.
            With the extra router bits and drilling we will be in
            good shape. However, if I can just
            find a 5/16th router bit we will be even better.
            This looks to be very close to the 7.5mm recommended for
            Osmia lignaria. It would be nice to have that size for
            our routed boards, but no one online seems to carry a 5/16th.

            Thanks again,
            Michael Wilson

            -----Original Message-----
            From:
            beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com on behalf of Jack Neff
            Sent: Fri 2/8/2008 10:36 AM
            To:
            beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: Re: [beemonitoring] cardboard tubes, various sizes and intro.

            Michael: You probably won't be able to get the range
            of straws you mention (2-10 mm) without spending some
            serious coin as most sizes would have to be custom
            manufactured. For relatively small lots, an easy
            technique is simply using a handheld drill to bore
            single holes in pieces of pine molding cut to
            appropriate lengths. (see Krombein, 1967 "Trapnesting
            Wasps and Bees...." Parting strip works fine for the
            smallest sizes (2-4 mm), 3/4x3/4 for the intermediate
            sizes and 1x1 for the largest. Extra long drill bits
            are available in all but the smallest sizes. In the
            real world, a 12 cm, 8 mm nest is unlikely to be fully
            utilized so shorter holes are usually readily
            accepted. If of decent quality (no knots), the
            individual are easily split to inspect the nests, and
            unlike straws, can be opened and closed many times.
            This is also an advantage over routed nests although
            the latter are much cheaper on a per nest basis..

            best

            Jack Neff
            --- Michael Wilson <
            mwilso14@...> wrote:

            > Hi,
            >
            > My name is Michael Wilson. I'm a graduate student at
            > the University of
            > Tennessee, Knoxville and am doing a study on native
            > bees in our area,
            > primarily at cucurbit plantings. I'm glad to have
            > found this group and
            > have enjoyed reviewing the material.
            >
            > Part of my project is to put out various size trap
            > nests in different
            > areas to asses 'stick nesting' bee presence.
            > Ideally, I would like a
            > wide variety of diameter of cardboard tubes from 2mm
            > - 10mm to use as
            > explained in Practical Pollination Biology. I have
            > some reed inter
            > nodes, but not as many as I would like. We also
            > routed out some boards
            > to stack, but only have 2 different sizes of router
            > bits to choose
            > from and have been unable to find more bit sizes.
            >
            > Question:
            > Is there a reasonable place to buy a wide variety of
            > cardboard tube
            > diameters?
            >
            > The places I've seen on the internet either require
            > bulk (very bulk)
            > purchasing or only have the size for the Blue
            > Orchard Bees. I may
            > drill sticks and blocks or try and find some more
            > reeds if I can't get
            > a variety of tubes. Are there other options?
            >
            > Also, anyone know when putting out nests in my area,
            > (East Tennessee)
            > will be too late to get some species? I'm thinking
            > as long as I have
            > everything out by the end of February I'll be OK.
            >
            > Thanks,
            > Michael Wilson
            >
            >

            John L. Neff
            Central Texas Melittological Institute
            7307 Running Rope
            Austin,TX 78731 USA
            512-345-7219

            __________________________________________________________
            Be a better friend, newshound, and
            know-it-all with Yahoo! Mobile. Try it now.
            http://mobile.yahoo.com/;_ylt=Ahu06i62sR8HDtDypao8Wcj9tAcJ


          • Malinda Slagle
            All- I am trying to assign functional group categories to several bee species and am having trouble figuring out a good source for determining which bees are
            Message 5 of 9 , Mar 16, 2008
              Message
              All-
              I am trying to assign functional group categories to several bee species and am having trouble figuring out a good source for determining which bees are primitively eusocial, which are solitary, which are cavity nesters and which are ground nesters. I would appreciate some good, current references for these. If you don't know references but know midwestern bee species well and would be willing to look at my list and assign categories, please let me know and I will send you the list (it's only 49 species).
              Thanks-
              Malinda

              Malinda W. Slagle
              Restoration Ecologist
              Litzsinger Road Ecology Center
              Missouri Botanical Garden
              9711 Litzsinger Rd
              St Louis MO 63124
              314-961-4410
              malinda.slagle@...

              To discover and share knowledge about plants and their environment, in order to preserve and enrich life.
              -mission of the Missouri Botanical Garden

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