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bee kleptoparasites

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  • m_lettow
    Hi all, I m working on a project comparing bee species richness and bee abundance in response to an oak savanna ecosystem restoration. I ve been tipped off by
    Message 1 of 5 , Dec 13, 2011
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      Hi all,

      I'm working on a project comparing bee species richness and bee abundance in response to an oak savanna ecosystem restoration. I've been tipped off by an acquaintance of mine doing similar work, that interestingly kleptoparasites of bees respond very quickly to changes in the bee community following restoration of oak savannas in her work. I'm interested to see if our response is similar, but I'm not entirely familiar with all of the kleptoparasites of bees. I know some of the more well known kleptoparasite taxa like Chrysididae, Nomadinae, Sphecodes, etc., but does anyone know of any exhaustive lists of bee kleptoparasite taxa? I wouldn't want to overlook any potentially important groups, and I can't seem to find any lists of these taxa given that they're not a monophyletic group. Thoughts?

      Thanks,

      Mitch Lettow
    • Griswold, Terry
      Hi Mitch, Michener 2007 The bees of the world has a table with all of the groups of cleptoparasitic bees listed. terry Terry Griswold USDA ARS Bee Biology &
      Message 2 of 5 , Dec 13, 2011
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        Hi Mitch,

         

        Michener 2007 “ The bees of the world” has a table with all of the groups of cleptoparasitic bees listed.

         

        terry

         

        Terry Griswold

        USDA ARS Bee Biology & Systematics Laboratory
        Utah State University
        Logan, UT 84322-5310
        USA

        435.797.2526

        435.797.0461 Fax

         

        From: beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com [mailto:beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of m_lettow
        Sent: Tuesday, December 13, 2011 9:36 AM
        To: beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [beemonitoring] bee kleptoparasites

         

         

        Hi all,

        I'm working on a project comparing bee species richness and bee abundance in response to an oak savanna ecosystem restoration. I've been tipped off by an acquaintance of mine doing similar work, that interestingly kleptoparasites of bees respond very quickly to changes in the bee community following restoration of oak savannas in her work. I'm interested to see if our response is similar, but I'm not entirely familiar with all of the kleptoparasites of bees. I know some of the more well known kleptoparasite taxa like Chrysididae, Nomadinae, Sphecodes, etc., but does anyone know of any exhaustive lists of bee kleptoparasite taxa? I wouldn't want to overlook any potentially important groups, and I can't seem to find any lists of these taxa given that they're not a monophyletic group. Thoughts?

        Thanks,

        Mitch Lettow

      • Skinner, John A
        Good memory Terry, I knew I had seen that table but... John A. Skinner Professor and Apiculture Specialist University of Tennessee 2431 Joe Johnson Drive 205
        Message 3 of 5 , Dec 13, 2011
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          Good memory Terry, I knew I had seen that table but…

           

          John A. Skinner

          Professor and Apiculture Specialist

          University of Tennessee                         

          2431 Joe Johnson Drive

          205 Ellington Plant Sciences

          Knoxville, TN  37996-4560

          (865) 974-0209, jskinner@...

          cid:image001.png@01CA69DB.B89A1360

           

          From: beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com [mailto:beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Griswold, Terry
          Sent: Tuesday, December 13, 2011 11:47 AM
          To: m_lettow; beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: RE: [beemonitoring] bee kleptoparasites

           

           

          Hi Mitch,

           

          Michener 2007 “ The bees of the world” has a table with all of the groups of cleptoparasitic bees listed.

           

          terry

           

          Terry Griswold

          USDA ARS Bee Biology & Systematics Laboratory
          Utah State University
          Logan, UT 84322-5310
          USA

          435.797.2526

          435.797.0461 Fax

           

          From: beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com [mailto:beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of m_lettow
          Sent: Tuesday, December 13, 2011 9:36 AM
          To: beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: [beemonitoring] bee kleptoparasites

           

           

          Hi all,

          I'm working on a project comparing bee species richness and bee abundance in response to an oak savanna ecosystem restoration. I've been tipped off by an acquaintance of mine doing similar work, that interestingly kleptoparasites of bees respond very quickly to changes in the bee community following restoration of oak savannas in her work. I'm interested to see if our response is similar, but I'm not entirely familiar with all of the kleptoparasites of bees. I know some of the more well known kleptoparasite taxa like Chrysididae, Nomadinae, Sphecodes, etc., but does anyone know of any exhaustive lists of bee kleptoparasite taxa? I wouldn't want to overlook any potentially important groups, and I can't seem to find any lists of these taxa given that they're not a monophyletic group. Thoughts?

          Thanks,

          Mitch Lettow

        • Doug Yanega
          ... Once you get outside of bees, the list of parasites (klepto or otherwise) is not terribly long; a very few chrysidids (most attack sphecoids or vespoids),
          Message 4 of 5 , Dec 13, 2011
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            >I know some of the more well known kleptoparasite taxa like
            >Chrysididae, Nomadinae, Sphecodes, etc., but does anyone know of any
            >exhaustive lists of bee kleptoparasite taxa?

            Once you get outside of bees, the list of parasites (klepto or
            otherwise) is not terribly long; a very few chrysidids (most attack
            sphecoids or vespoids), a number of bombyliids, some sapygids, some
            mutillids, a few meloids, and then a smattering of endoparasites like
            phorids, ripiphorids, and conopids, along with a tiny number of
            chalcidoids (e.g., leucospids, Melittobia) and gasteruptiids. Not an
            awful lot beyond that. If it weren't for the things that attack
            Megachilids, the list would be a lot shorter. ;-)

            Peace,
            --

            Doug Yanega Dept. of Entomology Entomology Research Museum
            Univ. of California, Riverside, CA 92521-0314 skype: dyanega
            phone: (951) 827-4315 (standard disclaimer: opinions are mine, not UCR's)
            http://cache.ucr.edu/~heraty/yanega.html
            "There are some enterprises in which a careful disorderliness
            is the true method" - Herman Melville, Moby Dick, Chap. 82
          • Jack Neff
            One has to be a bit careful with the term kleptoparasite .  Bombyliids, mutillids, conopids and the chalcidoids (among others) don t really qualify since
            Message 5 of 5 , Dec 13, 2011
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              One has to be a bit careful with the term "kleptoparasite".  Bombyliids, mutillids, conopids and the chalcidoids (among others) don't really qualify since they only consume the host (usually as a mature larva), not the provisions.  I prefer the term cuckoo bee for "parasitic" bees since they don't literally steal provisions.  Of course, that ignores things like chrysids who are non-bees behaving essentially as cuckoo bees.

              Jack
               
              John L. Neff
              Central Texas Melittological Institute
              7307 Running Rope
              Austin,TX 78731 USA
              512-345-7219

              From: Doug Yanega <dyanega@...>
              To: beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Tuesday, December 13, 2011 11:27 AM
              Subject: Re: [beemonitoring] bee kleptoparasites

               
              >I know some of the more well known kleptoparasite taxa like
              >Chrysididae, Nomadinae, Sphecodes, etc., but does anyone know of any
              >exhaustive lists of bee kleptoparasite taxa?

              Once you get outside of bees, the list of parasites (klepto or
              otherwise) is not terribly long; a very few chrysidids (most attack
              sphecoids or vespoids), a number of bombyliids, some sapygids, some
              mutillids, a few meloids, and then a smattering of endoparasites like
              phorids, ripiphorids, and conopids, along with a tiny number of
              chalcidoids (e.g., leucospids, Melittobia) and gasteruptiids. Not an
              awful lot beyond that. If it weren't for the things that attack
              Megachilids, the list would be a lot shorter. ;-)

              Peace,
              --

              Doug Yanega Dept. of Entomology Entomology Research Museum
              Univ. of California, Riverside, CA 92521-0314 skype: dyanega
              phone: (951) 827-4315 (standard disclaimer: opinions are mine, not UCR's)
              http://cache.ucr.edu/~heraty/yanega.html
              "There are some enterprises in which a careful disorderliness
              is the true method" - Herman Melville, Moby Dick, Chap. 82


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