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new bee dryer design

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  • David_r_smith@fws.gov
    Hi All, Upright Blow Dryer Bee Dryer I developed this technique after watching Sam Droege’s videos on washing and drying bees. The advantage to this system
    Message 1 of 2 , Nov 9, 2011
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      Hi All,

      Upright Blow Dryer Bee Dryer

      I developed this technique after watching Sam Droege’s videos on washing and drying bees.  The advantage to this system is it is fairly compact and easy to transport to BioBlitzs and pollinator-oriented activities.

      I built this dryer out of a piece of 1X4 lumber and a few small pieces of PVC from my nearest hardware store.  The blower sets upright and blows air through the tube placed on top of the dryer and dries the bees.  The specific design of the wooden frame depends upon the size and shape of the particular blow drier that is used.   I literally built the frame around the dryer, making certain I could slide it in and out of the frame for when I am travelling.  Make sure you get a blow dryer that has a “cool” temperature setting.  “Warm” or “hot” will bake the bees and make them brittle (even though it speeds things up to hit Bombus and other large hairy bees with a few minutes of “warm” air”).  I strongly recommend taping the heat setting button in the “cool” position to prevent accidently “baking” your bees.

      I use a clear plastic tube, but any PVC that fits into the larger piece glued on top of the dryer would work.  The clear tube lets you watch your bees bounce around like air-popped popcorn (it is also entertaining when you are doing this at a public event).  Glue or use electrical tape to attach fine netting at the bottom of the tube; close the top with another piece of netting and a rubber band.

      After washing and partially drying your bees (following the explicate directions in Sam’s slide shows); drop the wet bees in the plastic tube, set it in the large PVC tube holder on top of the dryer and turn it on.  By the time you have washed the next batch of bees and prepped them, the bees should be dry (if you follow the one minute or more washing protocol).

      One more recommendation, if you use shampoo instead of dish detergent to wash your bees it takes a lot less water and time to rinse them clean.  Bombus look real nice if you use your wife’s good shampoo (just don’t get caught)

    • Rob Snyder
      This is a method of drying bees I have been using, it works very well and takes less time for larger insects. You can use the dryer to fluff bees if needed.
      Message 2 of 2 , Nov 9, 2011
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        This is a method of drying bees I have been using, it works very well and takes less time for larger insects.  You can use the dryer to fluff bees if needed. But this method works for us folks trying to dry in the field. If the bees still look matted, rewash them and repeat the process.
         
        http://beeinformed.org/2011/11/collecting-with-bowl-traps/
         
        Rob Snyder

         

        To: beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com
        From: David_r_smith@...
        Date: Wed, 9 Nov 2011 08:12:59 -0700
        Subject: [beemonitoring] new bee dryer design

         

        Hi All,

        Upright Blow Dryer Bee Dryer

        I developed this technique after watching Sam Droege’s videos on washing and drying bees.  The advantage to this system is it is fairly compact and easy to transport to BioBlitzs and pollinator-oriented activities.

        I built this dryer out of a piece of 1X4 lumber and a few small pieces of PVC from my nearest hardware store.  The blower sets upright and blows air through the tube placed on top of the dryer and dries the bees.  The specific design of the wooden frame depends upon the size and shape of the particular blow drier that is used.   I literally built the frame around the dryer, making certain I could slide it in and out of the frame for when I am travelling.  Make sure you get a blow dryer that has a “cool” temperature setting.  “Warm” or “hot” will bake the bees and make them brittle (even though it speeds things up to hit Bombus and other large hairy bees with a few minutes of “warm” air”).  I strongly recommend taping the heat setting button in the “cool” position to prevent accidently “baking” your bees.

        I use a clear plastic tube, but any PVC that fits into the larger piece glued on top of the dryer would work.  The clear tube lets you watch your bees bounce around like air-popped popcorn (it is also entertaining when you are doing this at a public event).  Glue or use electrical tape to attach fine netting at the bottom of the tube; close the top with another piece of netting and a rubber band.

        After washing and partially drying your bees (following the explicate directions in Sam’s slide shows); drop the wet bees in the plastic tube, set it in the large PVC tube holder on top of the dryer and turn it on.  By the time you have washed the next batch of bees and prepped them, the bees should be dry (if you follow the one minute or more washing protocol).

        One more recommendation, if you use shampoo instead of dish detergent to wash your bees it takes a lot less water and time to rinse them clean.  Bombus look real nice if you use your wife’s good shampoo (just don’t get caught)


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