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RE: [beemonitoring] Re: Trap nests for Ceratina and other orphans (UNCLASSIFIED)

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  • Messinger, Wes NWP
    Classification: UNCLASSIFIED Caveats: NONE Please pass refs for these 2 methods below? Thx --W -- Wes Messinger Botanist, USACE Willamette Valley Projects
    Message 1 of 21 , Jul 12, 2011
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      Classification: UNCLASSIFIED
      Caveats: NONE

      Please pass refs for these 2 methods below? Thx --W

      --
      Wes Messinger
      Botanist, USACE Willamette Valley Projects
      541-688-8147

      -----Original Message-----
      From: beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com [mailto:beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com] On
      Behalf Of Jack Neff
      Sent: Monday, July 11, 2011 7:25 AM
      To: L B; beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: Re: [beemonitoring] Re: Trap nests for Ceratina and other orphans



      Most Anthidium seem to nest in prexisting cavities in the soil so most
      species won't show up in standard trap nest arrays. Some people have had
      success by partially burying trap nests or creating artificial soil banks
      with cavities in them.


      best


      Jack

      John L. Neff
      Central Texas Melittological Institute
      7307 Running Rope
      Austin,TX 78731 USA
      512-345-7219




      Classification: UNCLASSIFIED
      Caveats: NONE
    • Messinger, Wes NWP
      Classification: UNCLASSIFIED Caveats: NONE Woohoo this is fun. Idle notes from W OR: _Ceratina_ are at least investigating or bivouacking in _Perowskia_,
      Message 2 of 21 , Jul 12, 2011
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        Classification: UNCLASSIFIED
        Caveats: NONE

        Woohoo this is fun. Idle notes from W OR:

        _Ceratina_ are at least investigating or bivouacking in _Perowskia_,
        _Sidalcea cusickii_, and _Epilobium (=Chamerion) angustifolium_ stems that
        remain standing from previous seasons in my yard. I've noted only _Ceratina_
        so far this season in my horizontal teasel trap nests (2-18mm).

        Widely various (3-7mm?) holes in firewood all filled last year, late June
        _Osmia_ are now re-using some of them, but many still have pebble covers in
        place, for which I assume _Hoplitis_. Neither these trap nests or pilot
        blocks this year at work really started picking anything up until June, so
        all the fruit trees were done and I assume no early _Osmia_ have got the hint
        so far.

        Whee. --Wes

        --
        Wes Messinger
        Botanist, USACE Willamette Valley Projects
        541-688-8147

        -----Original Message-----
        From: beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com [mailto:beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com] On
        Behalf Of Laurence Packer
        Sent: Thursday, July 07, 2011 7:43 PM
        To: Jack Neff; Sam Droege
        Cc: beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com; Doug Yanega
        Subject: Re: [beemonitoring] Trap nests for Ceratina and other orphans



        raspberries, raspberries, raspberries!
        Old stems perfect for many bees (at least three genera in my garden), the
        flowers are perfect for many more bees and the fruits go well with almost any
        meal. I encourage responsible non-disposal of all old stems in all my talks
        to the general public.
        cheers

        laurence




        Classification: UNCLASSIFIED
        Caveats: NONE
      • Matthew McKinney
        Hey thanks for the tip. Next year I will try to bury my observation nests in the ground. -Matt
        Message 3 of 21 , Jul 12, 2011
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          Hey thanks for the tip. Next year I will try to bury my observation nests in the ground.
           
          -Matt
        • Jack Neff
          The only actual reference I m aware of for using partially buried trap nests for Anthidium is Jaycox, 1966 (Pan-Pacific Entomologist 42:18-26)  for a study of
          Message 4 of 21 , Jul 12, 2011
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            The only actual reference I'm aware of for using partially buried trap nests for Anthidium is Jaycox, 1966 (Pan-Pacific Entomologist 42:18-26)  for a study of Dioxys parasitizing nest of Anthidium utahense.  I don't have the ref handy but I don't think it is  particularly clear about methods.  He apparently partially buried wooden blocks with straws.  Krombein found Anthidium maculosum in trap nest stations placed on the desert floor in Arizona so maybe just low placement is sufficient for some taxa.  Most of the Anthidium nests I've encountered have been in banks so those might have a different search pattern and need a vertical soil surface.  Batra (1994) used adobe blocks as nest sites for Anthophora pilipes (Proceedings of the Entomological Society of Washington 96: 98-119).  Those bees excavate their own nests but one can create cavities in adobe by inserting dowels when pouring the stuff.  I've made "adobe" blocks for the benefit of bank nesting bees (like Lasioglossum zephyrum) by filling wooden forms with mud and letting them harden, then covering the top (to minimize erosion from rain) and exposing one of the sides to give the bees access.  Never did get Anthophora but the Lasioglossum liked them.  Did not try for Anthidium but they are not common locally.

            best

            Jack
             
            John L. Neff
            Central Texas Melittological Institute
            7307 Running Rope
            Austin,TX 78731 USA
            512-345-7219

            From: "Messinger, Wes NWP" <Wes.Messinger@...>
            To: beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Tuesday, July 12, 2011 12:06 PM
            Subject: RE: [beemonitoring] Re: Trap nests for Ceratina and other orphans (UNCLASSIFIED)

             
            Classification: UNCLASSIFIED
            Caveats: NONE

            Please pass refs for these 2 methods below? Thx --W

            --
            Wes Messinger
            Botanist, USACE Willamette Valley Projects
            541-688-8147

            -----Original Message-----
            From: beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com [mailto:beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com] On
            Behalf Of Jack Neff
            Sent: Monday, July 11, 2011 7:25 AM
            To: L B; beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: Re: [beemonitoring] Re: Trap nests for Ceratina and other orphans



            Most Anthidium seem to nest in prexisting cavities in the soil so most
            species won't show up in standard trap nest arrays. Some people have had
            success by partially burying trap nests or creating artificial soil banks
            with cavities in them.


            best


            Jack

            John L. Neff
            Central Texas Melittological Institute
            7307 Running Rope
            Austin,TX 78731 USA
            512-345-7219




            Classification: UNCLASSIFIED
            Caveats: NONE



          • Peter Kwapong
            Dear all, I ve been trying to find our the foraging behavior of my stingless bees.  Efforts to attract them to a feeder of sugar solution with vanilla essence
            Message 5 of 21 , Jun 7, 2012
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              Dear all,
              I've been trying to find our the foraging behavior of my stingless bees.  Efforts to attract them to a feeder of sugar solution with vanilla essence has not been successful. Not even their own honey will attract them.  Is anybody familiar with the set up and can please help? What should I do?
              Best wishes.
              Peter
               
              Dr. Peter K. Kwapong, Department of Entomology & Wildlife - International Stingless Bee Centre (ISBC), School of Biological Sciences, University of Cape Coast, Cape Coast. GHANA. Office Tel. +233 3321 31191 Home Tel. +233 3321 30102 Cell. +233 20 9764697, Fax +233 3321 35323. www.ucc.edu.gh


              From: Kimberly N. Russell <krussell@...>
              To: beemonitoring@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Thursday, 7 July 2011, 17:26
              Subject: [beemonitoring] soil measures & bee nesting

               
              Dear All,

              I am wondering if any of you have some suggestions for low-tech (low-cost!) ways to approximate soil compaction and soil composition (%sand/clay/silt/organic)? Has anyone tried suspending soil samples in water and measuring the separation (e.g., http://www.tulsamastergardeners.org/blackbox/soil_clas_calc.htm)? My goal is to characterize samples from various sites such that they can be compared with regards to compaction and composition.

              Also, I am interesting in counting stems in sample plots that could *potentially* be used by cavity nesting bees. How large must a stem be to be used by the smallest bee? I was thinking of a 3mm diameter minimum, but not sure if that makes sense.

              Thanks!
              Kim
              ********************************************************
              Dr. Kimberly N. Russell

              Research Scientist
              Department of Biology
              New Jersey Institute of Technology

              and

              Division of Invertebrate Zoology
              American Museum of Natural History

              phone: 1-973-642-7976
              E-mail: krussell@...
              Web: http://web.njit.edu/~krussell & http://research.amnh.org/invertzoo/spida
              ********************************************************



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